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  • Foster Braun

    American Road Trip Talk: Heather Hausmann: Sinful Sidney Sesquicentennial

    By Foster Braun

    Click here to listen…
    Click here to download…

    In the rough and tumble days of the late 1800’s, the little town of Sidney, Nebraska was an important military and commercial outpost on the railroad lines that were becoming the arteries of American expansion. It was indeed the Wild West, populated by such colorful characters as Buffalo Bill and Calamity Jane and earned the moniker, Toughest Town on the Tracks.
    In 2017 what was once called Sinful Sidney is celebrating its Sesquicentennial ( that’s 150 candles) between Aug. 18-20 with a double extravaganza. One is man-made and the other is Mother Nature made and utterly unique. Our guest Heather Haussmann, Cheyenne County Visitor and Convention Bureau, which is based in Sidney, has all the details for both events.


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    Sinful Sidney’s Sesquicentennial
    This summer the “toughest town on the tracks” is rolling out the red carpet for lovers of the Wild West and good old fashioned family fun. Whether you are a classic car enthusiast, history buff or just making plans for a family vacation, you’ll want to save August 18-21 for a visit to Sidney, NE.

    If any place knows how to throw a great party, it’s Sidney. Over the last 150 years the town, known as the “Wickedest Town in the West”, has seen the likes of Buffalo Bill, Wild Bill Hickok, and Calamity Jane. Good food, non-stop entertainment, a classic car show and loads of activities for kids will be topped off by two extraordinary light shows. The first one will be a spectacular firework display on Sunday night at the Cheyenne County Fair Grounds. The second one will be a once in a lifetime experience put on Mother Nature.

    On Monday, August 21, Western Nebraska will be one of the best places in the country to watch a total eclipse of the sun—make Sidney your hub. This will be the first total solar eclipse visible in continental United States for the 38 years and you will have one of the best seats in the house. Nebraska is one of a few places in the country that will be under the complete blackout as the moon blanks out the sun and day turns to night for nearly 3 minutes. It will be an historic event for young and old alike.

    This summer Sinful Sidney 150 will be an awesome opportunity to enjoy a good old fashioned community celebration and get a good night’s rest before witnessing the rare historic event of a total solar eclipse. It’s an experience your family will treasure for the rest of their lives.

    Don’t forget to mark the dates, August 18-21, 2017 in Sydney, NE. It’s going to be an unforgettable event that you won’t want to miss. For more information visit cheyennecountytourism.com and follow the celebration on Facebook at “Sinful Sidney 150 Sesquicentennial Celebration.”
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  • Foster Braun

    National Road Garage Sale 2018

    By Foster Braun

    Click here to listen...
     Click here to download.   In  our 2018 Spring Viva Las Vegas issue , under the Friends in the Fast Lane column, the lead story was about an 824 mile long garage sale!  In this American Road Trip Talk podcast,  you are going to meet Pat McDaniel, the lady who dreamed up this great gathering.  The Historic National Road Garage sale took place from May 31 to June 4 Along US 40 from Baltimore to St. Louis.  For ore information visit their Historic National Road Meanderings page on Facebook or www. oldstorefrontantiques.com      
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  • etchr66

    Geneva And Geneva On The Lake Ohio

    By etchr66

    It's summer time and its hot. What better way to cool down then to spend some time at the lake. With that in mind, our Namesake town for this entry is Geneva, Ohio and the nearby summer resort town of Geneva on the Lake. Both are located in Ashtabula County, which has a wealth of museums and sites of historic interest. In addition there are some eighteen covered bridges in the county, including both the longest and shortest covered bridges in the United States. Add the ten or so wineries in the county and what's not to like?   At 613 feet the Smolen-Gulf Bridge, loacted on Ashtabula County Road 25 just south of the city of Ashtabula, is the longest covered bridge in the country and the fourth longest in the world. The map coordinates are (41.855458,-80.762204). At just 18 feet the shortest covered bridge is the West Liberty Street Bridge in the town of Geneva. The map coordinates for it are (41.799183,-80.948532). [1]   Please comment if you like these entries or have any feedback to offer.   From the book "For Namesake, a Travel Book" [2]:   Geneva, Ohio is a town of 6,215 located in Ashtabula County along US Route 20. It lies 25 miles from the Pennsylvania border and 45 miles northeast of Cleveland. Geneva on the Lake is a town of 1,288, which lies 5 miles north of Geneva on Ohio Route 534. The county seat of Ashtabula County is Jefferson, located 10 miles southeast of Geneva. The closet college is Lake Erie College in the city of Painesville.   Ashtabula County was established in 1807 and was the first county created in the Connecticut Western Reserve. The area around Geneva was originally part of Harpersfield Township. In 1816 a small group of settlers decided to withdraw from Harpersfield and create their own community. They named it Geneva for the scenic town of Geneva, New York. With the completion of the Eric Canal in 1825, its location close to the lakefront added to its attraction. In 1829 the first post office was established. By 1840 the population was over 1,200. The Lake Shore railway came from Cleveland through Geneva to Ashtabula in 1852. The community of Geneva was incorporated as an official Ohio Village in 1866. By 1896 the village had a population of three thousand persons. In the early 1900’s Geneva gained its first automobile industry company with the manufacture of the Geneva Steamer in 1901. The company that manufactured this car closed just 3 years later. A few other attempts were made to manufacture automobiles in Geneva; however they too only lasted a few years. The grape industry has played an important part in the economy of Geneva and still does so today. In 1958 having obtained a population over 5000, Geneva was incorporated as an official Ohio “City”. [3]   Geneva on the Lake was Ohio’s first summer resort. It began in 1869 with the opening of the first public picnic ground on a bluff above Lake Erie known as Sturgeon Point. By the early 1900’s it had evolved into a camping and fishing playground for America’s elite. Incorporated as an Ohio Village in 1927; today it is a premier lakeshore vacationland. [4]   Ashtabula County has sixteen museums and sites of historic interest; the following is a sampling of those you may want to visit. The city of Ashtabula has Great Lakes Marine & Coast Guard Memorial Museum, Hubbard House (a northern terminus of the Underground Railroad) and Olin’s Museum of Covered Bridges. Conneaut has the Conneaut Historical Railroad Museum. Shandy Hall, 2 miles south of Geneva, is the 1815 home of Robert Harper and said to be the oldest frame house in the Western Reserve to be preserved in its original form. Hartsgrove has the Presidential Museum. In Jefferson you will find a nice railroad depot and the Victorian Perambulation Museum. In Windsor there is the Servants of Mary Center for Peace featuring a fifty-foot statue of Our Lady of Guadalupe. There are eighteen covered bridges in Ashtabula County including the longest one in the United States, spanning a distance of 613 feet. [1] The warm breezes off of Lake Erie make this region a prime location for growing grapes and there are some ten wineries in the county. [5] Geneva hosts an annual Grape festival in September. Geneva on the Lake is a very popular summer resort with a strip of tourist oriented businesses and parks. To learn about all of the attractions in the area stop by the Geneva on the Lake Visitor Information center at 5536 Lake Road.   Enjoy the Lake Erie shoreline with boating, camping, hiking, fishing or just relaxing at Geneva State Park, just one mile from Geneva on the Lake. Additional recreation areas include Pymatuning State Park and Reservoir, Mosquito Lake State Park and Reservoir, Headlands Beach State Park, and Punderson State Park.   Notable residents of Geneva include Brian Anderson, major league baseball pitcher; Edward S. Ellis, dime novel author; and Ransom E. Olds, automobile industry pioneer.       Notes:   1. http://www.experience-ohio-amish-country.com/covered-bridges.html   2. http://www.amazon.co.../dp/B00CBM6JFK/   http://www.barnesand...n=2940016722009   3. http://www.genevaohio.com/history.html   4. http://www.visitgenevaonthelake.com/history.htm   5. http://www.accvb.org/wineries.html   Picture is Harpersfield Covered Bridge, at 228 feet in length this was the longest covered bridge in Ohio until the construction of the Smolen-Gulf Bridge in 2008. Picture Credit: (Wikimedia Commons – User: Homefryes CC-BY-SA)
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  • Alex Burr - hester_nec

    Introduction

    By Alex Burr - hester_nec

    Hello. Tho I am new to this media, blogging, I am not new to American Road. I've been around since the beginning. I do have a road trip web site, but decided to give this blog a try to post my rather infrequent road trips in the Memphis, TN, area.   Being nearly 73 years old I'm old enough to remember the good old days of 2-lane road travel. Indeed, I went with my folks in the late 40's and early 50's on several trips from southern Maine to the Dayton, Ohio, area to visit friends and relatives. I look back and think, good old days?? Hot summer days on the road in a 10 year old Chrysler with no AC?? Motels that were more cabin than motel and usually not air conditioned?? Greasy spoon diners - tho most were pretty good. But, it was still exiting for a 10 year old to see what was around the corner. Kids miss so much today on vacation trips on the interstate. And there's not much new around the corner - or down the road, either. Got a Mickey D's in your home town - you'll find many along the road - along with BurgerKing, Wendy's, shopping malls with the same stores. No, kids today miss a lot.   Back in 1953 I was crazy enough to go to the west coast, from Maine, with a buddy of mine, on 20 to the mid-west where we picked up 66 to California. Then 101, more or less north to Oregon and Washington, then home to Maine, mostly on 20, but some on 30, 6 and 2. We were celebrating the big transition from child-hood to adult-hood - getting our drivers licenses. At the time, in Maine, you could get a license at 15 - Maine was largely rural and farm land so 15 year olds were expected to drive the family farm equipment, trucks, etc. Can you imagine two 15 year olds driving across country today?? Probably wouldn't get out of the state, to start with.   So, I'll probably be posting more on my new blog as time goes by. Won't be every day, won't be ever week. We'll try to find something to add at least inside a six month window.   Happy, and safe, travels everybody.
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Vienna, Missouri

Spring begins today (March 20). What better way to celebrate it than to get out and take a drive on the famous roads and highways of our great country. One such highway of course is Route 66. One namesake town very close to Route 66 is Vienna, Missouri, so it is the subject of this installment of the For Namesake" Blog [1]   Vienna, Missouri (32.18692, -91.94904) http://mapjam.com/vienna-missouri   Vienna, Missouri is a village of 610 located in Maries County at the Intersection of US Route 63 and Missouri State Route 42. It is the county seat of Maries County and lies 20 miles northwest of Rolla. The nearest university is Missouri University of Science and Technology, formally the University of Missouri-Rolla in Rolla. Famous Route 66 passes by south of Vienna, through the communities of Rolla and St. James.   Maries County was organized in March of 1855 and named for the Big and Little Maries Rivers. Vienna was selected as the county seat. It is said that Dr. V.G. Lethem, who was the presiding county judge, had a young women in his family named Vie Anna who had passed away. He desired that the village be given that name to honor her. Commissioner McCord, thinking this unwise, chose instead to name the community after the Austrian Capital, Vienna, a name so similar that even the good Dr. would approve. The post office here dates from 1867 forward, so we can take that as the date of the founding of the village, although it most likely had its beginning earlier. [2]   In Vienna you may visit the Maries County Courthouse and the Maries County Historical Society Museum. Dixon has the Blue Jay Farm, Boling Springs Canoe Rentals and the Rocky Edge Bluff Farm. The Capital city of Jefferson City has many attractions including The Art Bazaar, Carnahan Memorial Gardens, Cole County Historical Society Museum, Jefferson Landing State Historical Site, La Maison Conference Center, Lewis & Clark Trailhead Monument, Missouri Governors Mansion, Missouri Highway Patrol Safety Education Center & Museum, Missouri State Capitol, Missouri State Museum, Missouri Veterinary Medical Foundation Museum, Museum of Missouri Military History Rudge Nature Center and Summit Lake Winery. Rolla has a Visitors Center at 1311 Kings Highway. There you may learn about The Centre, Leach Theater, Ozark Actors Theater, Splash Zone, University of Science & Technology Experimental Mine, University of Science & Technology Mineral Museum and other Rolla area attractions. In St. James you may visit the St. James Winery.   The Mark Twain National Forest is just southwest of Rolla. Vienna is located close to several conservation areas including Canaan Conservation Area, Painted Rock Conservation Area, Spring Creek Conservation Area, and Woods Memorial Conservation Area. Nearby Lakes include Lake Ozark and Peaceful Valley Lake. State Parks in the region include Ha Ha Tonka State Park, Katy Trail State Park, Lake of the Ozarks State Park and Onondaga Cave State Park.   Notes:   1. http://www.amzn.com/B00CBM6JFK   2. http://thelibrary.org/lochist/moser/mariesco.html   Picture Credit: Maries County Courthouse at Vienna, Missouri (Americasroof at en.wikipedia CC-BY-SA)  

etchr66

etchr66

 

American Road Trip Talk (Podcast): Dave Schaub: Iron Pants Marathon Part 2

Click here to listen... Click here to download...   In 2011 a California grocer named Dave Schaub drove his Brizio-built Custom ’32 Ford roadster through all 49 continental United States in an amazing 7 days, 14 hours and 21 minutes. We featured a picture of Dave at the finish line in Alaska in one of our recent Friends in the Fast lane Column.   In part two of our interview Dave describes how he made the incredible journey on 5 hours of sleep a day without being accompanied by a chase crew. It was literally man and machine against the clock for nearly 9,000-miles to raise money for the Ronald McDonald House at Stanford University Hospital. But the most challenging part of the race against the clock and the most inspiring moment came as Dave entered Canada on his way to the finish line in Alaska.   ###### Today’s interview is brought to you by the Illinois Route 66 Scenic Byway--Where the Mother Road Begins. From famous road-side restaurants to hidden gems, Route 66 in Illinois offers a journey back in time. ##### Saturday, March 29, 2014 7:00 a.m. to 4:45 p.m. • Shreve ElementarySchool 598 North Market Street (State Route226), Shreve, Ohio 44676 This peak spring bird migration event includes self-guided tours throughout the Killbuck Wildlife Area, Ohio’s largest inland wetlands complex. Experts will be available at designated spotter stations to help you find and identify birds. At the school, enjoy a full day of “sensational” family-friendly activities in addition to six workshops offered by well-known experts in their fields.   ###### ######   Pick up a copy of American Road magazine and don't miss another edition!   Find a Store: http://dld.bz/AMRoadRetailOutletsPreview the current issue: http://americanroadm...previewmag.html American Road Magazine: http://www.americanroadmagazine.com/  

Foster Braun

Foster Braun

 

American Road Trip Talk (Podcast): Dave Schaub: Iron Pants Marathon Part 1

Click here to listen,,, Click here to download…   In 2011 the jovial California grocer drove named Dave Schaub drove his Brizio-built ’32 Ford roadster through all 49 continental United States in an amazing 7 days, 14 hours and 21 minutes. We featured a picture of Dave at the finish line in Alaska in one of our recent Friends in the Fastlane Columns. It was all part of an effort to raise funds for the Ronald McDonald House at Stanford University Hospital. In this first part of the interview, Dave talks about getting himself and his custom car ready for the grueling journey. In part 2 Dave Schaub will reveal a surprising benefit that he gained from the journey. ###### Today’s interview is brought to you by the Illinois Route 66 Scenic Byway--Where the Mother Road Begins. From famous road-side restaurants to hidden gems, Route 66 in Illinois offers a journey back in time. ##### Saturday, March 29, 2014 7:00 a.m. to 4:45 p.m. • Shreve ElementarySchool 598 North Market Street (State Route226), Shreve, Ohio 44676 This peak spring bird migration event includes self-guided tours throughout the Killbuck Wildlife Area, Ohio’s largest inland wetlands complex. Experts will be available at designated spotter stations to help you find and identify birds. At the school, enjoy a full day of “sensational” family-friendly activities in addition to six workshops offered by well-known experts in their fields. ###### ######   Pick up a copy of American Road magazine and don't miss another edition!   Find a Store: http://dld.bz/AMRoadRetailOutletsPreview the current issue: http://americanroadm...previewmag.html American Road Magazine: http://www.americanroadmagazine.com/   Pick up a copy of American Road magazine and don't miss another edition!   Find a Store: http://dld.bz/AMRoadRetailOutletsPreview the current issue: http://americanroadm...previewmag.html American Road Magazine: http://www.americanroadmagazine.com/

Foster Braun

Foster Braun

 

American Road Trip Talk (Podcast): Emmett Brown: Freshwater Fishing Museum Part 2

Click here to listen... Click here to download …   Like any good fish story, the tale of the National Freshwater Fishing Museum located in the wooded lakeland of northwest Wisconsin is about a big one…that didn’t get away. In this second of two parts, Emmett Brown, the museum director, gives some of the vision and mission behind the Hall of fame. It is very much about protecting our valuable fish stocks and educating the public about ways to keep our freshwater resources healthy. Emmett even has a story about the big one that got away…deliberately.   For a full article about the museum and a collection of photos, check out our Winter 2013 issue of American Road Magazine.             ###### Today’s interview is brought to you by the Illinois Route 66 Scenic Byway--Where the Mother Road Begins. From famous road-side restaurants to hidden gems, Route 66 in Illinois offers a journey back in time. ###### ######   Pick up a copy of American Road magazine and don't miss another edition!   Find a Store: http://dld.bz/AMRoadRetailOutletsPreview the current issue: http://americanroadm...previewmag.html American Road Magazine: http://www.americanroadmagazine.com/   Pick up a copy of American Road magazine and don't miss another edition!   Find a Store: http://dld.bz/AMRoadRetailOutletsPreview the current issue: http://americanroadm...previewmag.html American Road Magazine: http://www.americanroadmagazine.com/

Foster Braun

Foster Braun

 

American Road Trip Talk (Podcast) Emmett Brown:freshwater Fishing Hall Museum Part 1

Click here to listen... Click here to download…   Like any good fish story, the tale of the National Freshwater Fishing Museum located in the wooded Lakeland of northwest Wisconsin is about a big one…that didn't get away. Emmett Brown, the current director of the Museum, takes us on a two part tour of this remarkable and growing collection of freshwater fishing memorabilia, hall of fame for the greatest fishermen and women and even home to over 100,000 lures, rods and reels. For a full article about the museum and a collection of photos, check out our Winter 2013 issue of American Road Magazine. In this first of two parts, Emmett tells us how a famous distillery was behind the opening of the museum and he’ll describe a part of the display that might even make old Noah step off the ark for a look!     ###### Today’s interview is brought to you by the Illinois Route 66 Scenic Byway--Where the Mother Road Begins. From famous road-side restaurants to hidden gems, Route 66 in Illinois offers a journey back in time. ###### ######   Pick up a copy of American Road magazine and don't miss another edition!   Find a Store: http://dld.bz/AMRoadRetailOutletsPreview the current issue: http://americanroadm...previewmag.html American Road Magazine: http://www.americanroadmagazine.com/   Pick up a copy of American Road magazine and don't miss another edition!   Find a Store: http://dld.bz/AMRoadRetailOutletsPreview the current issue: http://americanroadm...previewmag.html American Road Magazine: http://www.americanroadmagazine.com/

Foster Braun

Foster Braun

 

Cairo, Georgia

This entry in the For Namesake [1] blog is Cairo, Georgia. (30.88101, -84.19922) http://mapjam.com/cairo-georgia   Cairo, Georgia is a town of 9,607 located along US Route 84 in the southwest corner of Georgia. The town is the county seat of Grady County and lies 15 miles west of Thomasville, Georgia and 40 miles north of Tallahassee, Florida. The town has a campus of Southwest Georgia Technical College. The main campus is in Thomasville, which also has Thomas University. Bainbridge College, a 2-year junior college, is in the town of Bainbridge, 20 miles west of Cairo. The first settlement in the Cairo area was known as Miller’s Station and was a stagecoach stop between Thomasville and Bainbridge. Cairo was charted first as a town in 1870 and then as a city in 1906. It was named for the city in Egypt but is pronounced, “kay-row”. [2]   Cairo is nicknamed “Georgia’s Hospitality City” and “Syrup City”. There is no relationship with the Karo brand of corn syrup even though the pronunciation is the same. The town earned its nickname because it was a large producer of cane syrup from the early 1900’s up until the late 1990’s. The best-known producer in the area was the W. B. Roddenbery Company. Dean Foods purchased the company in 1993 and the Cairo plant was shut down about 10 years later. The Cairo high school football team is known as the “Syrupmakers” and the schools female athletic teams are called the “Syrup Maids”.   Attractions in Cairo include the Roddenbery Memorial Library with an excellent Children’s library and a genealogy collection; The Birdsong Nature Center at 2106 Meridian Road, offering nature trails and bird watching and the Cairo Antique Car Museum on US 84 in town. The Pope museum, 8 miles to the northeast of town, offers more than 200 statues all done my Mrs. Pope Forester. The statues honor heroes from both world wars and others. Even though the museum is now closed, and up for sale, you can still view the statues on your own. Cairo holds several annual festivals including the Rattlesnake Roundup in January, the Great Southwest Antique Auto Show and Rally in May, Pow-Wow in July, Mule Day in November and a Christmas parade each December. In Thomasville there is the Jack Hadley Black History Museum (214 Alexander Street); Pebble Hill Plantation (1251 US 319 South); Thomasville Cultural Center (600 East Washington) and the Lapham Patterson House Historic Site at 626 North Dawson.   Water sports are available along the Ochlocknee River, which flows south of Cairo and at several nearby lakes. These include Lake Lamonia, Lake Miccosukee and Lake Jackson in northern Florida and Lake Seminole 40 miles west of Cairo on the Georgia/Florida border. Seminole State Park is located on the northern side of the lake. Grady County and the area around Cairo are also well known for its excellent hunting resources.   Notable persons from Cairo include Teresa Edwards, former professional basketball player and Olympic Gold Medalist; Jackie Robinson, Baseball Hall of Fame member and first African American to play professional baseball; Daryle Singletary, county music singer; Mickey Thomas, lead singer of Jefferson Starship; and Arthur L. Williams, Jr., founder of Primerica Financial Services.   Berlin, Georgia is another nearby For Namesake town.   Notes:   1. http://www.amzn.com/B00CBM6JFK   2. http://www.georgiaencyclopedia.org/nge/Article.jsp?id=h-2944   Picture Credit: Grady County Courthouse in Cairo, Georgia (Wikimedia Commons – Tim Ross Public Domain)

etchr66

etchr66

 

American Road Trip Talk (Podcast): Paige Hunt: Tasty Home Of The Blues

Click here to listen... Click here to download …       The movie The Help took viewers behind the scenes of a post WWII southern society in the midst of change. It was filled with wit, insight and mouth-watering southern fried dishes. When Hollywood location scouts for the movie found Greenwood, MS, they knew that had struck gold. The architecture, cotton fields, fabulous food, and residents who welcome everyone with open arms were enough to convince producers that Greenwood was the perfect place.   Paige Hunt who directs the town’s convention and visitor’s bureau will give you a guided tour of Greenwood in this interview. She'll tell you all about the rich blues and southern cuisine that make a trip to the Delta Country well worth your while.     Greenwood, MS was featured in our Summer 2012 issue under Route 61 Blues Features.       ###### Today’s interview is brought to you by the Illinois Route 66 Scenic Byway--Where the Mother Road Begins. From famous road-side restaurants to hidden gems, Route 66 in Illinois offers a journey back in time. ######   Pick up a copy of American Road magazine and don't miss another edition!   Find a Store: http://dld.bz/AMRoadRetailOutletsPreview the current issue: http://americanroadm...previewmag.html American Road Magazine: http://www.americanroadmagazine.com/   Pick up a copy of American Road magazine and don't miss another edition!   Find a Store: http://dld.bz/AMRoadRetailOutletsPreview the current issue: http://americanroadm...previewmag.html American Road Magazine: http://www.americanroadmagazine.com/

Foster Braun

Foster Braun

 

Dublin, Indiana By Request

This entry in our For Namesake blog is by request and is about Dublin, Indiana. You will find this village and many many others in my book, "For Namesake"[1] If anyone has any other For Namesake places that they would alike to see in this blog, either from my book or not, please let me know.   Dublin, Indiana (39.812294,-85.206442)   Dublin, Indiana is a village of 790 located in Wayne County along Historic US Route 40. It lies 16 miles west of the larger city and county seat of Richmond. The closest college or university is Earlham College in Richmond. US Route 40 is known as “Our National Road” and was one of our nation’s first transcontinental highways, stretching 3157 miles from Atlantic City, New Jersey to San Francisco California. Commissioned in 1926 its path lays along that of several previous highways and transportation routes including the National Road, the Victory Highway and parts of the Lincoln Highway. You can learn about the highway, past and present, at the National Road Welcome Center at 5701 National Road East in Richmond or at the US Route 40 web site [2]   Display at US 40 Our National Road Welcome Center  The village of Dublin was first plated in 1830. A Female Seminary was established there in 1835. The attitude of temperance was strong in the area and there were no drinking saloons in the early days of Dublin. By 1870 Dublin had a population of 1,076 persons. [3] An historical marker located by the volunteer fire department in town indicates that Dublin was the site in 1851 of the first woman’s rights convention in Indiana. Interestingly the name Dublin has nothing to do with Irish heritage, but rather from a hill along the National Road that required doublin’ up of horses to climb in muddy conditions. [4]   The Wayne county area around Dublin has numerous attractions. In Cambridge City you can see the 1830’s Overbeck House, McMaze Corn Maze and visit the Museum of Overbeck Art Pottery. Centerville has the 1840 Mansion House Inn, a Model T Ford Museum, Centerville Historic District and Salisbury Courthouse. In Connersville you can enjoy a ride along the Whitewater Valley Railroad. Fountain City has the Levi Coffin Home, which was a stop along the Underground Railroad. Near Hagerstown you can see the Birthplace of air pioneer, Wilber Wright. The 1871 Isaac Kinsey House known as Beechwood is near Milton. Mount Auburn offers the Huddleston House Tavern, an 1838 Inn along the National Road. In New Castle you can visit the Indiana Basketball Hall of Fame. The City of Richmond offers the Garr House and Farm Museum, the Indiana Football Hall of Fame, Joseph Moore Art Museum, Richmond Art Museum, Wayne County Courthouse and the Wayne County Historical Museum. There are also four historic districts in Richmond and the Madonna of the Trail Statue. Located at 2260 East Main in Richmond this is one of twelve such statues in the country, placed by the Daughters of the American Revolution to honor pioneer women. In the northern part of Wayne County is an Amish settlement in Williamsburg.   Madonna of the Trail in Richmond, Indiana  Outdoor recreation in the area is available at Summit Lake State Park, north of Dublin and at three recreation areas along Brookville Reservoir, south of Dublin. These include Whitewater Memorial State Park, Quakertown State Recreation Area and Mounds State Recreation Area.   Notable persons from Wayne County include Jim Jones, cult founder/leader; Rich Mullins, Christian contemporary artist; and Ned Rorem, composer.   New Paris, Ohio, located 20 miles east of Dublin is another "For Namesake" town.   Notes:   1. http://www.amzn.com/B00CBM6JFK   2. http://www.route40.net   3. http://www.archive.org/details/historyofwayneco00inyoun pg. 262-266   4. http://www.visitrichmond.org/history.cfm   Picture Credits : (courtesy of the author)  

etchr66

etchr66

 

American Road Trip Talk (Podcast) Karen Raymore: Comfort Food Cruise 2014

Click here to listen... Click here to download…   For many of us this has been a hard winter that has kept us cooped up. Good news, there is an event taking place during the first two weeks of February that is guaranteed to get you out of the house if you live anywhere near Ohio. The scenic Hocking Hills area of Ohio just 40 Miles southeast of Columbus is hosting a Comfort Food Cruise Feb. 1-2 and 8-9, 2014. Karen Raymore, the Executive Director of the Hocking Hills Tourism Association has all the details about this wonderful opportunity to visit a winter wonderland and to sample local comfort food for just $15 per person. It’s a feast for the eyes and the tummy. You can find full details and get your tickets online at www.explorehockinghills.com. ###### Today’s interview is brought to you by the Illinois Route 66 Scenic Byway--Where the Mother Road Begins. From famous road-side restaurants to hidden gems, Route 66 in Illinois offers a journey back in time. ######   Pick up a copy of American Road magazine and don't miss another edition!   Find a Store: http://dld.bz/AMRoadRetailOutletsPreview the current issue: http://americanroadm...previewmag.html American Road Magazine: http://www.americanroadmagazine.com/   Pick up a copy of American Road magazine and don't miss another edition!   Find a Store: http://dld.bz/AMRoadRetailOutletsPreview the current issue: http://americanroadm...previewmag.html American Road Magazine: http://www.americanroadmagazine.com/

Foster Braun

Foster Braun

 

American Road Trip Talk (Podcast) Mike Wendland: Roadtreking

Click here to listen... Click here to download   Frequent listener to this podcast know Foster Braun as the host of American Road Trip Talk but most of the time I wear an entirely different hat. For 40 years I have been a radio broadcaster in Metropolitan Detroit and for the last 16 of those years, I have co-hosted a weekly program called the Internet Advisor. We help people with their computer problems and introduce them to experts in the field.   On the first show of 2014, I interviewed Mike Wendland, a nationally noted tech reporter on radio and CBS TV. Mike recently retired and, like some of you, decided to take his considerable talents on the American Road in a small RV. Mike has turned this new chapter in his life into a whole new career called Roadtreking. You can find stories and pictures of his adventures at http://www.roadtreking.com. Mike now handles all sorts of topics from repairing your generator to flying a drone and knowing when it’s too cold to RV!   ##### Today’s interview is brought to you by the Illinois Route 66 Scenic Byway--Where the Mother Road Begins. From famous road-side restaurants to hidden gems, Route 66 in Illinois offers a journey back in time. ###### Today’s interview is brought to you by the Illinois Route 66 Scenic Byway--Where the Mother Road Begins. From famous road-side restaurants to hidden gems, Route 66 in Illinois offers a journey back in time. ######   Pick up a copy of American Road magazine and don't miss another edition!   Find a Store: http://dld.bz/AMRoadRetailOutletsPreview the current issue: http://americanroadm...previewmag.html American Road Magazine: http://www.americanroadmagazine.com/   Pick up a copy of American Road magazine and don't miss another edition!   Find a Store: http://dld.bz/AMRoadRetailOutletsPreview the current issue: http://americanroadm...previewmag.html American Road Magazine: http://www.americanroadmagazine.com/    

Foster Braun

Foster Braun

 

American Road Trip Talk (Podcast) Erika Nelson: America's Favorite Roadside Attractions

Click here to listen... Click here to download …   For many years now Erika Nelson has been a big game hunter stalking her elusive prey all over the continental United States. The major difference is not the size of her quarry but that they stand still so patiently waiting to be captured. I am referring, of course, to the World’s Largest Collection of the World’s Smallest Copies of the World Largest Things. Erika is a peripatetic artist who has scoured the American Road for the Largest Coin, Biggest Ball of String, Biggest Bank Vault Door and most recently the World’s Largest Baseball. During this interview we will catch up with our busy copyist as she was home for a short break before heading out to capture another one of the American Road’s Largest Roadside Attractions.     ###### Today’s interview is brought to you by the Illinois Route 66 Scenic Byway--Where the Mother Road Begins. From famous road-side restaurants to hidden gems, Route 66 in Illinois offers a journey back in time.   ######     Pick up a copy of American Road magazine and don't miss another edition!   Find a Store: http://dld.bz/AMRoadRetailOutletsPreview the current issue: http://americanroadm...previewmag.html American Road Magazine: http://www.americanroadmagazine.com/   Pick up a copy of American Road magazine and don't miss another edition!   Find a Store: http://dld.bz/AMRoadRetailOutletsPreview the current issue: http://americanroadm...previewmag.html American Road Magazine: http://www.americanroadmagazine.com/  

Foster Braun

Foster Braun

 

Pick A Namesake Community For This Blog

This blog is based on Namesake communities from my book "For Namesake, a Travel Book - Places in America inspired by Famous World Cities".http://www.amzn.com/B00CBM6JFK The book contains articles on 17 famous world cities and 185 cities, towns and vilages in the USA that have the same name. I believe it's a fun and enjoyable read.   I have been doing this blog now for awhile where I have been picking the Namesake communities to present. Now it's your turn to comment and let me know if there is a particular community from my book that you would like me to blog about. So here is the list from the book. Please comment and let me know:   Alabama: Athens, Florence, Geneva, Madrid   Arizona: Florence   Arkansas: Georgetown, Havana, London, Paris   California: Dublin, Georgetown   Colorado: Florence, Georgetown   Connecticut: Georgetown, New London   Delaware: Georgetown   Florida: Geneva, Havana, Lisbon   Georgia: Athens, Berlin, Cairo, Dublin, East Dublin, Geneva, Georgetown, Milan, Rome, Vienna   Idaho: Georgetown, Moscow, Paris   Illinois: Athens, New Athens, Berlin, New Berlin, Cairo, Florence, Geneva, Georgetown, Havana, Lima, Lisbon, London Mills, Milan, Paris, Rome, Vienna, Warsaw   Indiana: Dublin, Geneva, Georgetown, Milan, New Paris, Rome city, Warsaw   Iowa: Geneva, Lisbon, Madrid, New London, Rome, New Vienna,   Kansas: Florence, Havana, Milan, Moscow   Kentucky: Florence, Georgetown, London, Paris, Warsaw   Louisiana: Athens, Georgetown, Lisbon, Vienna   Maine: Lisbon, Paris, West Paris   Maryland: Berlin, Londontowne, Vienna   Michigan: Athens, Milan   Minnesota: Florence, Geneva, Georgetown, Milan, New London   Mississippi: Florence, Georgetown   Missouri: Cairo, New Florence, New London, New Madrid, Milan, Moscow Mills, Paris, Vienna, Warsaw   Montana: Florence, Lima   Nebraska: Cairo, Geneva, Madrid   New Hampshire: Berlin, Lisbon, Londonderry   New Jersey: Berlin   New Mexico: Madrid, Milan   New York: Athens, New Berlin, Cairo, Geneva, Lima, Rome, Warsaw   North Carolina: Dublin, New London, Warsaw   North Dakota: Berlin, Havana, Lisbon   Ohio: Athens, New Athens, Berlin Heights, Cairo, Dublin, Geneva, Geneva on the Lake, Georgetown, Lima, Lisbon, London, New London, Milan, Moscow, New Paris, Saint Paris, New Vienna, South Vienna, Warsaw   Oklahoma: Lima   Oregon: Florence   Pennsylvania: Athens, Berlin, East Berlin, New Berlin, Dublin, New Florence, Geneva, Georgetown, Lima, Moscow, New Paris, Rome   South Carolina: Florence, Georgetown   South Dakota: Florence, Vienna   Tennessee: Athens, Milan, Moscow, Paris   Texas: Athens, New Berlin, Dublin, Florence, Georgetown, Havana, New London, Paris, Roma   Virginia: Dublin, Vienna, and Warsaw   Washington: Geneva   West Virginia: Athens, Cairo, Vienna   Wisconsin: Athens, Berlin, New Berlin, New Lisbon, New London, Rome   Thanks.  

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etchr66

 

Christmas In Madrid, New Mexico

This entry in the "For Namesake"[1] blog is about Madrid, New Mexico. Madrid, once a company coal mining town, was famous from the 1920's to the 1940's when miners would light up the winter sky with some 150,000 Christmas lights powered from the company's coal fed generators. Today this tradition has been revived with the town being lit again by its artisans and shop owners. Explore the Christmas events and all there is to see and do in Madrid at http://www.visitmadridnm.com   Madrid, New Mexico (35.406705, -106.152523) http://aMAP.to/madrid-newmexico   Madrid, New Mexico is a village of 204 located in Santa Fe County along New Mexico Route 14. This highway is known as the Turquoise Trail and connects Albuquerque to Santa Fe. Madrid lies 20 mile southwest of Santa Fe, the county seat of Santa Fe County and the capital of New Mexico. The closest colleges are in Santa Fe and include the College of Santa Fe, Institute of American Indian Arts, St. Johns College and Southwestern College. Santa Fe also has Santa Fe Community College.   Madrid is in the mineral rich Ortiz Mountains. It is the oldest coal mining region in New Mexico, with evidence of mining activity as early as the mid 1850’s. By 1892 the yield was such that a 6.5-mile standard gauge railroad spur was constructed from the valley there, then called “Coal Gulch”, to the main line of the Santa Fe Railroad. By 1899 all coal production in the area was consolidated there and Coal Gulch had become Madrid. It is believed to have been named for a family of settlers. It became a boomtown of about 2,500 persons. To provide homes for the miners and their families, cabins were dismantled in Kansas, shipped by rail and reassembled. In 1919 Oscar Joseph Huber was hired as fulltime superintendent of the mines. He was instrumental in turning Madrid into a model company town, with a company store, fully equipped hospital and good schools. He formed an Employee’s Club that required every miner to donate from .50 to $1.00 per month for community causes. They were also required to participate in town events such as the Fourth of July celebration and the now famous Christmas Light Displays. This lasted from the 1920’s to the 1950’s when the mines closed. In the 1970’s Oscar’s son, Joe Huber, began renting the miner’s cabins to artisans. This trend converted Madrid into what it is today, a small village with a quiet residential area, and a busy main street filled with merchants and art galleries. A recent source for income for the village has been in supplying granite slabs for countertops. Like most of the communities in Santa Fe County, Madrid is a Census Designated Place (CDP). [2] [3]   In Madrid itself you may visit the Old Coal Mine Museum and the famous Mineshaft Tavern. The ending of the 2007 film “Wild Hogs” was set and filmed in Madrid. Nearby Cerrillos, has the Turquoise Mining Museum & Petting Zoo. Twenty-four miles south, along the Sandia Crest National Scenic Byway, you do not want to miss seeing the quirky Tinkertown Museum. [4] The capital city of Santa Fe is also a must stop, and offers much to see and do. Sites of architectural or historic interest include the Barrio De Analco Historic District, Cathedral Basilica of Saint Francis of Assisi, Loretto Chapel, Palace of the Governors and San Miguel Mission. Santa Fe is considered to be the second largest art center in the United States after New York City. The highest concentration of galleries is along Canyon Road, east of the downtown Plaza. There are also many Sculptures located throughout the city. For the performing arts there is the Lensic Theater where dance, music and opera productions are held on a regular basis. Museums include the Georgia O’Keeffe Museum, Institute of American Indian Arts, Museum of Indian Arts & Culture, Museum of International Folk Art, New Mexico History Museum, New Mexico Museum or Art and the Wheelwright Museum of the American Indian. Check the Santa Fe Convention and Visitors Bureau web site for complete information on all of the city’s attractions. [5]   There are two state parks in the Madrid area; Cerrillos Hills State Park and Hyde Memorial State Park. Rafting is available on the nearby Rio Grande River. You may take a tramway to the top of Sandia Peak, in the Cibola National Forest, for spectacular views of the city of Albuquerque, far below.   Mary Wayne “Mae” Marsh, American film actress, was born in Madrid.   Notes:   1. http://www.amzn.com/B00CBM6JFK   2. http://www.mad-rid.com   3. http://www.epodunk.com/cgi-bin/genInfo.php?locIndex=17897   4. Meier, Johnnie, “Tinkertown: The Wonderful Whimsical World of Ross Ward”, Route 66 Magazine, Volume 17, No. 3; (summer, 2010) 8   5. http://www.santafe.org   Picture: Shops in old miners cabins in Madrid, New Mexico (Wikimedia Commons – Cathy Calkin CC-BY-SA)  

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American Road Trip Talk (Podcast)– Mike Gassman: Santa's Christmas Catsup Climb

Click here to listen... Click here to download … Collinsville is a little town in southwest Illinois with a big roadside attraction that’s hard to miss and that will be even harder to miss this Christmas season. Towering over a hundred feet above the town’s main road stands the world’s largest catsup bottle, a symbol of both the town’s proud past and valiant efforts to save the landmark during the 1990’s. In this podcast Mike Gassman, President, CEO and Big Tomato of the non-profit World’s Largest Catsup Bottle, Inc. tells how they got Jolly Old St. Nicholas to climb 70 feet up that tower. Visit their website for more details.   ######   Pick up a copy of American Road magazine and don't miss another edition!   Find a Store: http://dld.bz/AMRoadRetailOutletsPreview the current issue: http://americanroadm...previewmag.html American Road Magazine: http://www.americanroadmagazine.com/   Pick up a copy of American Road magazine and don't miss another edition!   Find a Store: http://dld.bz/AMRoadRetailOutletsPreview the current issue: http://americanroadm...previewmag.html American Road Magazine: http://www.americanroadmagazine.com/  

Foster Braun

Foster Braun

 

New Madrid, Missouri

This entry in the "For Namesake"[1] Blog is about the town of New Madrid, Missouri. Incorporated in 1808 It is believed to be the oldest town west of the Mississippi River, albeit it is not too far west. It has an interesting history. A series of strong earthquakes that nearly destroyed the entire region began 202 years ago this December.   New Madrid, Missouri (36.586449, -89.527855) http://aMAP.to/newmadrid-missouri   New Madrid, Missouri is a town of 3,116 located in New Madrid County along US Route 61/62 in the southeastern corner of the state. It lies on the Mississippi River, about 40 miles southwest of Cairo, Illinois. It is the county seat of New Madrid County. Interstate 55 passes to the north and west of New Madrid. The closest universities are Southeast Missouri State University in Cape Girardeau and a campus of the University of Tennessee at Martin, Tennessee.   Francois and Joseph LeSieur, Canadian trappers, who came to the area to hunt and trade with the Indians living in the region, made the first settlement at the site of what would become New Madrid in 1783. They named their village L’Anse a la Graise which means “cove of grease”, most likely referring the abundance of game in the area. The Spanish gave Colonel George Morgan a grant of land that included this region. He promised to populate the region and dreamed of founding a great city that would be the capital of a principality. He traveled to this spot in 1789, and had the land surveyed for a grand village that he named New Madrid, after the Spanish capital city. His detailed plan called for wide streets with specific areas set aside for parks, churches and schools. To entice settlers to move there he promised to give the first 600 settlers’ half-acre city lots and five acre outlying lots for the sum of $1, if they would build a home and reside there for one year. His plan worked and the town of New Madrid was born. [2] It was formally incorporated in 1808 and is believed to be the oldest city west of the Mississippi. In December of 1811 the first of a series of great earthquakes, three of which reached a magnitude of eight on the Richter scale, struck the region. The quakes were so numerous and severe, it was said that by the end of the winter of 1812, only a few houses within 250 miles of the Mississippi River and the town of New Madrid remained undamaged. [3]   In New Madrid you may visit the Hart-Stepp House Art Gallery, Higgerson School Historic Site, A. B. Hunter, Sr. Mansion (1910), Hunter-Dawson Home State Historic Site, Kochtitsky Home (1880), Mississippian Indian Temple Mound, New Madrid County Courthouse, and the New Madrid Historical Museum. Nearby Caruthersville has the Armory & Art Center, Aztar Riverboat Casino, Caruthersville Recreation Center, Historic “Lighthouse” Water Tower, and the Lady Luck Casino. Near East Prairie is the Towosahgy State Historic Site, a prehistoric Indian village and trade center. Sikeston offers the Begg’s Pumpkin Patch, Columns Monument, Cotton Country Murals, Flyway Hunting Club, Southeast Missouri Agriculture Museum, Sikeston Depot and the Sikeston Race Park.   There are several wildlife areas in Missouri near New Madrid, including the Donaldson Point Conservation Area, Mingo National Wildlife Refuge, Seven Island Conservation Area and Ten Mile Pond Conservation Area. There are also two Missouri State Parks in the area; Big Oak Tree State Park and Lake Wappapello State Park. Across the River in Tennessee are Lake Isom National Wildlife Refuge, Reelfoot Lake, Reelfoot National Wildlife Refuge, and Reelfoot State Park. Just north in Kentucky is Columbus-Belmont State Park.   Notable residents from New Madrid County include Eric Hurley, Major League Baseball pitcher; Peter C. Myers, former United States Deputy Secretary of Agriculture; Alfred C. Sikes, former chairman of the United States Federal Communications Commission; Robert Vaughn, author; and Thomas Wilson, former Chief Executive Officer of the Boeing Company. All are from the larger city of Sikeston.   Cairo, Illinois, another Namesake town, is located 40 miles to the northeast of New Madrid, along the Mississippi River.   Notes:   1. http://www.amzn.com/B00CBM6JFK   2. Douglass, Robert Sidney History of Southeast Missouri (Chicago, IL: The Lewis Publishing Company, 1912) p.81-87   3. http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~monewmad/nm-history/history-2.htm   Picture: Bog Oak Tree State Park near New Madrid, Missouri Picture Credit: (Knowledgeum at en.wikipedia CC-BY-SA)  

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Berlin, New Jersey

This entry in our blog about namesake cities [1] is about Berlin, New Jersey. Berlin, New Jersey is one of some 15 Berlin's that are incorporated communities in the United States.   Berlin, New Jersey (39.791226, -74.929054) http://aMAP.to/berlin-newjersey   Berlin, New Jersey is a town of 7,588 located in Camden County along US Highway 30. It lies just 16 miles southeast of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Berlin is a designated Borough of New Jersey. There is also a Berlin Township and unincorporated populated places known as East Berlin and West Berlin all located in the same general area in Camden County. My understanding is that in New Jersey boroughs and townships differ in the way the local government is set up. It is difficult to distinguish between these places with the same name in the same area, so this article pertains to all of them.   This area was once known as “Long-a-coming” and saw its first settlers in 1714. The name was adapted from a Native American path connecting the New Jersey shore with the Delaware River called Lonaconing Trail. Iron Forges and Glassworks were among the first industries in the 1800’s. In 1867 the area was named Berlin, although no one really knows why this name was chosen. It became a town in 1910. In 1927, Berlin was formally incorporated as a Borough taking some area away from Berlin Township. [2]   There are no colleges or universities located in Berlin itself, however there are four located nearby in Camden County. These include Camden County College, College of South Jersey, Rowen University and Rutgers University. Of course there are many others across the Delaware River in Philadelphia including Drexel University, La Salle University, Peirce College, Temple University, and The University of Pennsylvania.   Attractions in the Berlin area include Adventure Aquarium, Children’s Garden, the soup Tureen Museum and the Battleship New Jersey in Camden; Historic Barclay Farmstead Museum in Cherry Hill; South Jersey Museum of American History and the Heritage Glass Museum in Glassboro; and the Indian King Tavern Museum in Haddonfield. The Indian King Tavern was build in 1750 and in 1777 was the site where New Jersey declared its independence from English rule. Just 16 miles away the sites of Philadelphia beckon. How could you resist visiting the Philadelphia Mint, The Edgar Allan Poe National Historic Site or seeing the Liberty Bell at Independence National Historic Park? The kids would love seeing the creepy bugs and crawling things at the Insectarium Museum (8046 Frankford Avenue in northeast Philadelphia). Check it all out at the “Visit Philly” Web site. [3] If you are in Philadelphia, I would be very remiss if I didn’t remind you to check out the famous Philly Cheesesteak sandwiches. I’ll leave it up to you to decide between Pat’s, Geno’s or many of the other rivals vying for the finest Cheesesteak in Philly. [4] Have one for me.   For outdoor recreation you can go to Berlin Park right in the town of Berlin or visit any of four New Jersey State Parks located close by. These include Neshaminy State Park on the Delaware River, Mount Laurel State Park in Mount Laurel, Parvin State Park in Elmer, and Rancocas State Park in Hainesport. Berlin is also close to The Wharton State Forest.   Nearby US 130, from Trenton to Camden, was included in the original Proclamation route of the Lincoln Highway when it was laid out in 1913. In just a few years, however, the Lincoln was rerouted to US 1 on the Pennsylvania side of the river. [5] Much of the more than 3000 mile Lincoln Highway running from New York to San Francisco can still be driven today, it’s an enjoyable ride.   Notable residents and natives of Berlin include Ron Dayne, running back for the Houston Texans; Kelly Ripa, co-host of the “Live With Kelly and Michael” morning television show; and Dan Pomponio, top alcohol funny car driver.   Notes:   1. http://www.amzn.com/B00CBM6JFK or http://www.barnesandnoble.com/s/2940016722009   2. http://www.nextination.com/longacoming/berlin.html   3. http://www.visitphilly.com   4. Genovese, Peter, “Philly’s Phinest”, American Road Magazine, Volume VI, No.4; (Winter, 2008), 34   5. Butko, Brian, Greetings from the Lincoln Highway (Mechanicsburg, PA: Stackpole Books, 2005) p. 34.   Picture: Indian King Tavern Museum near Berlin, New Jersey. Picture Credit: (Wikimedia Commons - User: Smallbones Public Domain)  

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American Road Trip Talk (Podcast): Robert Huttinger: Covered Bridges-There's An App For That!

Click here to listen... Click here to download Believe it or not, covered bridges are as American as apple pie. According to Robert Huttinger, web designer and covered bridge aficionado, what we might consider quaint rural river crossings are very particular to North America. Robert is not only knowledgeable about these architectural wonders but he also wants to make sure that the rest of us can find them. That is why he developed a covered bridges app or program for the iPhone or iPad, a portable tablet in the hands of millions of users. We reviewed the application in detail in the fall 2012 issue of American Road Magazine. Robert will share his enthusiasm for covered bridges and tell how you can use his application to find one near you or even plan a vacation route to see a bunch of these beauties.   You can find out more about this application for your iPhone, iPad or other iOS device by visiting the Covered Bridges - North America homepage. You can also find the app by visiting the iTunes app store and downloading it to your device. **********   This Podcast is Brought to you by:     ########   Pick up a copy of American Road magazine and don't miss another edition!   Find a Store: http://dld.bz/AMRoadRetailOutletsPreview the current issue: http://americanroadm...previewmag.html American Road Magazine: http://www.americanroadmagazine.com/   Pick up a copy of American Road magazine and don't miss another edition!   Find a Store: http://dld.bz/AMRoadRetailOutletsPreview the current issue: http://americanroadm...previewmag.html American Road Magazine: http://www.americanroadmagazine.com/  

Foster Braun

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American Road Trip Talk (Podcast)– Jay Allen: Painting The Lincoln Highway

American Road Trip Talk (podcast)– Jay Allen: Painting the Town Click here to listen... Click here to download…       The picture above is one of 43 murals created by Jay Allen our guest on this week's American Road Trip Talk. Jay's sign painting company, Shaw Craft Signs collaborated with renowned muralist Bill Hueg to produce these historic gems in Illinois cities under a grant obtained by the Illinois Lincoln Highway Coalition. During our interview Jay will give you the full history of the mural pictured above in Dixon, IL and its connection with a very important American president. Visit the full gallery of these historic murals to see more of these beauties. Jay is affiliated with the Wall Dogs, a national organization of artists who gather to paint murals at cities all over the US.   View the full story of this project in the Tunnel Vision column of the Autumn issue of our American Road magazine available at major bookstores, newsstands and at Americanroadmagazine.com. When you visit our homepage be sure to check all the features we offer from trip planners to special bargains and product reviews. #########   This Podcast is Brought to you by:     ########   Pick up a copy of American Road magazine and don't miss another edition!   Find a Store: http://dld.bz/AMRoadRetailOutletsPreview the current issue: http://americanroadm...previewmag.html American Road Magazine: http://www.americanroadmagazine.com/   Pick up a copy of American Road magazine and don't miss another edition!   Find a Store: http://dld.bz/AMRoadRetailOutletsPreview the current issue: http://americanroadm...previewmag.html American Road Magazine: http://www.americanroadmagazine.com/

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American Road Trip Talk (Podcast):mary Ellen Hennesy Nottage: Csi Indiana Part 2

Click here to listen... Click here to download   This is Part 2 of our interview at the Indiana Medical History Museum in Indianapolis.   Sometimes the best visits you make during a vacation are those unique, hidden attractions that aren't on the big maps. It's a special little cafe, a unique overlook or a remarkable museum that is full of extraordinary displays. Such was my experience when I visited the Indiana Medical History Museum off US 40, the National Highway, just outside downtown Indianapolis. There I met Mary Ellen Hennessey Nottage, the passionate curator of medical history in Indiana. We conducted the interview as we strolled through what had been the pathology lab for the state's main mental health hospital for more than a century. In Part 2 of our interview you will find out how death provided both a valuable resource in medical study and a compassionate benefit to the deceased's family. This interview was not only remarkable because of the historical artifacts and history of the institution but also because it traced the early efforts to hunt down a cruel disabler and often killer, mental illness.     #########   This Podcast is Brought to you by:     ########   Pick up a copy of American Road magazine and don't miss another edition!   Find a Store: http://dld.bz/AMRoadRetailOutletsPreview the current issue: http://americanroadm...previewmag.html American Road Magazine: http://www.americanroadmagazine.com/   Pick up a copy of American Road magazine and don't miss another edition!   Find a Store: http://dld.bz/AMRoadRetailOutletsPreview the current issue: http://americanroadm...previewmag.html American Road Magazine: http://www.americanroadmagazine.com/

Foster Braun

Foster Braun

 

American Road Trip Talk (Podcast)– Mary Ellen Hennesy Nottage: Csi Indiana Part 1

Click here to listen...   Click here to download …   Sometimes the best visits you make during a vacation are those unique, hidden attractions that aren't on the big maps. It's a special little cafe, a unique overlook or a remarkable museum that is full of extraordinary displays. Such was my experience when I visited the Indiana Medical History Museum off US 40, the National Highway just outside downtown Indianapolis. There I met Mary Ellen Hennessey Nottage, the passionate curator of medical history in Indiana. We conducted the interview as we strolled through what had been the pathology lab for the state's main mental health hospital for more than a century. This interview was not only a remarkable because of the historical artifacts and history of the institution but also because it traced the early efforts to hunt down a cruel disabler and often killer, mental illness. In Part 2 of our interview you will find out how death provided both a valuable resource in medical study and a compassionate benefit to the deceased's family.   By the way, we didn't even go into the paranormal studies that have been done throughout the years on the grounds of this once massive complex. It is said that the ghosts of some of the mentally ill who died here roam the grounds. Explore that at your own risk. I will be hiding behind the couch; tell me what you find. ;-D   For more information about the Indiana Medical History Museum visit this site. You'll find the hours of operation and how to arrange tours for schools and other interested groups.       #########   This Podcast is Brought to you by:     ########   Pick up a copy of American Road magazine and don't miss another edition!   Find a Store: http://dld.bz/AMRoadRetailOutletsPreview the current issue: http://americanroadm...previewmag.html American Road Magazine: http://www.americanroadmagazine.com/   Pick up a copy of American Road magazine and don't miss another edition!   Find a Store: http://dld.bz/AMRoadRetailOutletsPreview the current issue: http://americanroadm...previewmag.html American Road Magazine: http://www.americanroadmagazine.com/

Foster Braun

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Georgetown, Delaware And "punkin Chunkin"

This entry in the "For Namesake" blog is about Georgetown, Delaware. [1] A mere 8 miles away at the Wheatley farm near Bridgeville is the home of the "Punkin Chunkin" contest held every year in early November. This year's contest will be held on Friday November 1 through Sunday November 3. It may be your opportunity to see a world record "Chunk" from a variety of pumpkin throwing contraptions from trebruchet's to air cannons and every thing in between. For more info see the contest website at http://www.punkinchunkin.com If you miss the event you can watch a recap of it on the Science channel on Thanksgiving evening, November 28.   Georgetown, Delaware ( 38.690113, -75.385473) http://aMAP.to/georgetowndelaware     Georgetown, Delaware is a town of 6,422 located in Sussex County along US Route 9 near the intersection with US Route 113. It is the county seat of Sussex county and lies 35 miles south of Dover, the capital of Delaware. Four colleges have a satellite campus in Georgetown including Delaware State University, University of Delaware, Wilmington University and Delaware Technical Community College.   The first settlement in Delaware was the Dutch community of Lewes established in 1631. When the boundaries of Sussex County were established in 1775 it was natural to select Lewes as the county seat. However, this was a difficult location for residents in the western part of the county to travel to in those days, so they petitioned the Delaware General Assembly for a more central location. Since the central part of the county was largely unsettled at that time, a commission was setup to purchase land and to build a courthouse and jail. They did so and laid out a town in a circle one mile across. The county seat was moved to the new town on October 26, 1791 and it was named Georgetown in honor of George Mitchell who was active on the commission. The town thrived until it was divided by the Civil War with sons fighting on both sides and families torn apart by divided loyalties. A war memorial stands on the south side of the current courthouse to honor all those from Georgetown who have served in military service throughout the town’s history. [2]   Georgetown has several historic structures many of which are listed on the National Register of Historic Places. You may view many of them via a walking tour of downtown Georgetown starting at the 1791 Old Sussex County Courthouse. Exhibits of interest in Georgetown include the Delaware World War II Aviation Museum, Nutter D. Marvel Carriage Museum, Treasure of the Sea Exhibit at Delaware Technical Community College and the Elsie Williams Doll Collection. Georgetown has a 19th century renovated train station. The Possum Point Players are a voluntary community theater group in town. Near the community of Bridgeville, just 8 miles east of Georgetown, is the location of the annual World Championship “Punkin Chunkin” contest held each November. In Lewes you may visit the Burton-Ingram House with a small maritime museum, Cannonball House, Delaware Breakwater East End Lighthouse, De Vries Monument, Fisher Martin House, Harbor of Refuge Lighthouse, Maull House, Nassau Valley Winery, St. Peters Church from 1681 and Zwaanendael Museum. You can also take a ferry from Lewes to Cape May, New Jersey. Milford has Mispillion Lighthouse, Parson Thorne Museum and the Riverfront Theater. Milton has the Lydia Black Cannon Museum. Seaford offers the Burton Brothers Hardware Store, Days Gone By Museum, the Governor Ross Mansion and Plantation, Seaford Museum and the Seaford Fire Museum. In Woodland south of Seaford you can cross the Nanticoke River on a cable drawn ferry.   Georgetown is located less than 20 miles from many beaches along the Atlantic coastline. There are several nature and wildlife preserves in the region including Barnes Woods Nature Preserve south of Seaford, Abbots Mill Nature Center and the Dupont Nature Center in Milford, Edward H. McCabe Nature Preserve in Milton and Prime Hook National Wildlife Refuge on the coast, north of Lewes. If deep sea fishing is a favorite pastime, charter boats are available at Fisherman’s Wharf in Lewes. There are four state parks in the area including Cape Heniopen, Delaware Seashore, Holts Landing and Trap Pond State Parks.   Notable residents of Georgetown include Matt Barlow, vocalist for the band Iced Earth; and Luke Pettigout, NFL football player.   Notes:   1. www.amzn.com/B00CBM6JFK or www.barnesandnoble.com/s/2940016722009   2. http://www.georgetownde.com/gorghist.html   Picture Credit: (Wikimedia Commons user GB Fan CC-BY-SA)  

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American Road Trip Talk (Podcast) Dave Silva: Road Warriors Favorite Beast

Click here to listen… Click here to download…   We all have a trusted steed that carries across the American Road whether it’s a vintage VW Campervan or the latest Hybrid. But there is group of travelers with a peculiarly deep passion for an historic American Road vehicle: The GMC Motorhome. From 1974-1978 GMC made the only RV produced by a major automaker. Of the 12,000 made, 8000 are believed to still be on the road.   The GMC motorhome was not a home stuck on top of a truck frame; it was intentionally built as a motorhome from the ground up. In addition the community of devoted fans who keep these spectacular RV’s going are unique among car groups. According to our guest, Dave Silva, an avid RV fan and chronicler of the GMC Motorhome, “There is a cottage industry of specialized vendors, all on a first name basis. They drive these 40 year old coaches all over the country under the protection of the 'Blacklist'."” This is a story not only of a remarkable house on wheels but also of the passionate people who have kept them running on the American Road.   Check out Dave Silva's homepage.     #########   This Podcast is Brought to you by: For more than forty years, Vandalia has been celebrating their history with the Grande Levee’ on the grounds of the Vandalia Statehouse, which is the Oldest State Capitol Building in Illinois. This year, 2013, the event will be held September 27 & 28. To coincide with the Grande Levee’, the Vandalia Tourism Commission will be hosting their Annual Harvest Festival downtown Saturday, September 28th with fun for every member of the family. For more information, contact Vandalia Tourism Center at 618-283-2728 or email tourism@vandaliaillinois.com.   This podcast is also brought to you by the Illinois Lincoln Highway Coalition. This fall plan a visit to the amazing corn maze tribute to the Lincoln Highway Centennial at Jonamac Orchard in Malta, Il. The first Seedling Mile of this historic highway was laid in Malt. Test your orienteering skills and try not to get lost in the 10 acre corn maze with 3 miles of pathways and two bridges. The maze opens Saturday, August 31 and runs through late October. Find out more about this colossal corn curiosity by visiting jonamacorchard.com/ ########   Pick up a copy of American Road magazine and don't miss another edition!   Find a Store: http://dld.bz/AMRoadRetailOutletsPreview the current issue: http://americanroadm...previewmag.html American Road Magazine: http://www.americanroadmagazine.com/   Pick up a copy of American Road magazine and don't miss another edition!   Find a Store: http://dld.bz/AMRoadRetailOutletsPreview the current issue: http://americanroadm...previewmag.html American Road Magazine: http://www.americanroadmagazine.com/

Foster Braun

Foster Braun

 

Dublin, Ohio Plus "our National Road" Across Ohio

Recently I had an opportunity to spend two days driving across the Buckeye State of Ohio on US 40, "Our National Road". So in this entry I am going to blog about Dublin, Ohio as our "Namesake" city and share some highlights and photos of some of the things to see along Our National Road.   Dublin, Ohio from the book "For Namesake, A Travel Book - Places in America Inspired by Famous World Cities [1]   Dublin, Ohio (40.099229, -83.114077) http://aMAP.to/dublin-ohio     Dublin, Ohio is a city of 41,751 located in Franklin County along Ohio Route 745. The city is a suburb of and lies 15 miles northwest of the Capital city of Columbus. Parts of Dublin lie in Delaware and Union counties. Interstate 270, “The Jack Nicklaus Freeway”, and US Highway 33 pass through Dublin, as does the Scioto River.   The first settlers arrived in the Dublin area as early as 1802 and it was plated as a village in 1810. It was named after Dublin, Ireland, the birthplace of one of its developers. Dublin remained small until recent times and had a population of only 681 in 1970. Since then it has blossomed due to the construction of I 270, corporations who moved there headquarters there such as Wendy’s International and the growth of Muirfield Village golf club. [2] Muirfield Village was founded by Jack Nicklaus and has hosted the annual Memorial Golf Tournament since 1976. It was named after the famous Muirfield golf course located in Gullane, Scotland on the Firth of Forth. Dublin officially became a city in Ohio in 1987 when it reached a population of 5,000.   There are no less than six four-year colleges and universities in the Columbus area. These include Ohio State University, Franklin University, Ohio Dominican University, Pontifico College Josephinum, and Capitol University in Columbus; and Otterbein College in Westerville. Ohio State University with 59,000 students is the largest University in Ohio. Founded in 1870, it has a large campus (1755 Acres) four miles north of downtown Columbus and 6 satellite campus located throughout out the state. Ohio Wesleyan University lies north of Dublin in the city of Delaware, Ohio.   There are lots of attractions to see in the Dublin and Columbus area. In Dublin itself you can tour the Fletcher Coffman Homestead, an 1860’s era home and see the rather quirky Chief Leather Lips Monument, a smaller sculpture similar to South Dakota’s Crazy Horse (see pictures below). Every August, Dublin holds an annual Irish Festival. Theatrical productions are offered at Abbey Theater, a part of the full service Dublin Community Recreation Center. In Powell, just north of Dublin, you may visit the Columbus Zoo and Aquarium or cool off at the Zoombezi water park. Delaware, 15 miles north, has Perkins Observatory, the Nash House Museum, Olentangy Indian Caverns and the birthplace of President Rutherford B. Hayes. Columbus offers the Columbus Museum of Art, Jack Nicklaus Museum, Ohio Historical Museum, Columbus Topiary Garden, Columbus Center of Science and Industry, James Thurber House, the Statehouse, the Ohio Capitol Building and the Santa Maria. The later is a full size replica of one of the ships that Columbus sailed to America in 1492. Theatrical productions are available at Wexner Center for the Arts on the campus of Ohio State University. For information on these and other attractions in the area see the Discover Ohio web site [3]   For outdoor recreation Dublin has 46 developed parks and some 72 miles of bicycle trails. There are also numerous parks in Columbus. Boating is available at Alum Creek Lake, O’Shaughnessy Reservoir and Hoover Reservoir. There are two nearby Ohio State Parks; Alum Creek on Alum Creek Lake and Delaware, near the city of Delaware.   Notable residents from Dublin include Nick Goings, NFL football running back; Brady Quinn, NFL football quarterback; Chris Quinn, NBA basketball player; and Jay Richardson, NFL football defensive end. Jack Nicklaus and James Thurber were born in Columbus, grew up there and attended Ohio State University. Another famous person from Columbus was world war one flying ace Eddie Rickenbacker.   Images of the Chief Leather Lips Monument in Scioto Park in Dublin (yours truly at the top)   US 40, "Our National Road" Across Ohio   In driving US 40 we utilized the great Travel Guide "The Historic National Road in Ohio" available at the Ohio National Road Association http://www.ohionationalroad.org   There is much to see along Our National Road in Ohio and two days is not enough time to see it all. The following are photos that I took of just a few of the many things to see. My reason for posting these is to encourage you to travel and enjoy Our National Road. It truly is a fun and interesting drive.   Spanish Revival Service Station in Bridgeport     Restord Mile Marker and Brick Section at St. Clairsville   Old Road Section near Hendrysburg   Peters Creek 1828 S-Bridge     Fox Run S-Bridge Park     Eagles Nest Monument near Brownsville   Springfield, Ohio has one of the 12 Madonna of the Trail Monuments. It is in downtown Springfield right alongside US 40. For a list of all 12 locations you may go to the following web site: http://www.dar.org/natsociety/content.cfm?ID=324&FO=Y&hd=n     If you like airplanes you can see literally hundreds of them preserved at the United States Air Force Museum at Wright Patterson Air Force Base near Dayton, Ohio. They range all the way back to World War One up to the present. This is a must see museum. Here are just a few images. The last one is me crashing the Space Shuttle in the simulator they have there.     That's all for this entry. If you enjoy these posts or even if you don't please comment.   The starting picture is at the City Hall in Dublin.   Notes:   1. http://www.amzn.com/B00CBM6JFK or http://www.barnesandnoble.com/s/2940016722009   2. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dublin,_Ohio   3. http://consumer.discoverohio.com        

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