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DennyG

Tour For New Lincoln Highway Book

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The new Lincoln Highway book by Michael Williamson & Michael Wallis has just been released and a coast to coast promotional tour will be starting next week. The schedule is here. Wallis, of course, is familiar to roadies for his Route 66 connections and Williamson's earned two Pulitzers for his photography.

 

Pennsylvanians (and maybe at least one Ohioan) will enjoy an extra bonus since Brian Butko will be appearing with the two Michaels on at least two west Pennsylvania stops - Ligonier & Pittsburgh. Brian released his own "Greetings from the Lincoln Highway" just about two years ago and his latest, "Roadside Attractions", could start appearing any minute now. There are rumors that it may be available at the Ligonier & Pittsburgh stops. Yeah, being an author and a Lincoln Highway authority is pretty cool but, on top of that, Brian's also a forum member.

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The new W & W book is formatted much like "Route 66: The Mother Road", full of many fine images across the route. Most of us road dogs know a good deal about the L.H., but I think this and Brian's "Greetings from the Lincoln Highway" are really going to make Route 66 look over its shoulder (no pun intended), because the L.H. will soon be making up ground in the battle for attention. I would say it's already starting to take off, as it's being talked about by many 66ers. Granted, it's because of the author, but it's getting talked about like never before. I know a former editor of this magazine and staunch 66er is heading on a L.H. journey into Nebraska and into Nevada later this month, so the interest is there, though I wouldn't say it's soley because of the book. I think a lot of folks in the 66 community who've been in the movement for nearly 20 years have seen just about everything there is to see on it and are wanting a new, fresh adventure, and the L.H. offers that....plus you get several hundred more miles out of it than 66 offers. I think in the next five years you're going to see even more L.H. books, videos, maps of abandoned alignments, keychains, hats, decals....you name it. And believe me, this ain't a bad thing! :twocents:

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The new W & W book is formatted much like "Route 66: The Mother Road", full of many fine images across the route. Most of us road dogs know a good deal about the L.H., but I think this and Brian's "Greetings from the Lincoln Highway" are really going to make Route 66 look over its shoulder (no pun intended), because the L.H. will soon be making up ground in the battle for attention. I would say it's already starting to take off, as it's being talked about by many 66ers. Granted, it's because of the author, but it's getting talked about like never before. I know a former editor of this magazine and staunch 66er is heading on a L.H. journey into Nebraska and into Nevada later this month, so the interest is there, though I wouldn't say it's soley because of the book. I think a lot of folks in the 66 community who've been in the movement for nearly 20 years have seen just about everything there is to see on it and are wanting a new, fresh adventure, and the L.H. offers that....plus you get several hundred more miles out of it than 66 offers. I think in the next five years you're going to see even more L.H. books, videos, maps of abandoned alignments, keychains, hats, decals....you name it. And believe me, this ain't a bad thing! :twocents:

 

It's OK to be a fan of both, right? As a newbie to road dogging I find them both (as well as the other older roads) fascinating and intruiging. The more I read the more I want to explore and discover what was once there, what remains, and the changes that have taken place in between.

 

One thing you neglected to mention is that centennial of the founding of the L.H. is just around the corner. I believe that as we get closer to that date more communities will realize what they have running through their front yards which will generate more interest.

That's my :twocents: on the subject

 

roadhound

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It's OK to be a fan of both, right? As a newbie to road dogging I find them both (as well as the other older roads) fascinating and intruiging. The more I read the more I want to explore and discover what was once there, what remains, and the changes that have taken place in between.

roadhound

 

 

There are many folks who only like Route 66 (or at least, strongly prefer it), and that's OK. Same goes with Lincoln Highway, National Road, etc. and all US Routes, county roads, auto trails, state highways, etc., etc. That's what AMERICAN ROAD is all about, celebrating them all! But I'd also guess that most 66'ers (myself and my husband among them) generally would prefer two-lane roads to the interstate, and the US is a pretty big place with so many sights to see. So, when they do go someplace else, they'd probably prefer two lane roads.

 

Enjoying travel on old roads is definitely a state of mind to which many people aren't accustomed. Most people I have spoken with say they'd go crazy being in the car so long, or they are baffled that Pat and I would drive 1400 miles in a weekend, without actually spending time in one place. To drive 700 miles to a point, spend a few hours and come back, was mind boggling for them. Their mindset for a trip is that you choose a destination to spend time in, and spend as little time getting there and back as possible.

 

I explained that in our case, the point where we stopped was not the destination, it was just the farthest point we went before we had to veer back home. The entire journey *was* the destination, whether it was a town 1/2 hour from home or 7 hours...every point in between the beginning and the end was what we wanted to see. What we want to see varies between old pavement and alignments (road geek stuff) but also restaurants, diners, neon signs, parks, soda fountains, nature...whatever!

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Amen, preach it, sister.

 

I don't have a favorite road, though there are a few I always like to drive. Actually, once I get to know a road, I'm ready to find a different one, because I want to see what's around that next curve.

 

jim

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Interesting conversation (and a great example of the rule of unintended consequences:-). Note that one of the Michael & Michael book tour stops, Joliet, Illinois, is actually on an alignment of Sixty-Six near where it crossed the Lincoln Highway. It's also pretty close to the one time longest US highway, US-6, and probably some other cool roads I don't know about. It's kind of early, 9:00 AM, but, now that you Illinois folks won't be up late the night before at a movie premier like you hoped, that shouldn't be a problem.

 

In checking US-6's rank in the length standings (it's currently second to US-20), I discovered this quote from George Stewart who considered using Six, then the longest, as a photo subject before settling on US-40: "Route 6 runs uncertainly from nowhere to nowhere, scarcely to be followed from one end to the other, except by some devoted eccentric." Wonder what his point was;-)

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Note that one of the Michael & Michael book tour stops, Joliet, Illinois, is actually on an alignment of Sixty-Six near where it crossed the Lincoln Highway. It's also pretty close to the one time longest US highway, US-6, and probably some other cool roads I don't know about. It's kind of early, 9:00 AM, but, now that you Illinois folks won't be up late the night before at a movie premier like you hoped, that shouldn't be a problem.

 

Greetings!

 

I just wanted to say if you lived east of Joliet, and/or didn't feel like waking up early on Saturday morning, you could always consider stopping in at our event with Michael Wallis at the Flossmoor Public Library. He will be here from 5 to 6:30 PM on Friday evening the night before his Joliet appearance. The Flossmoor Library is very close to where the Lincoln Highway intersects with the historic Dixie Highway in Chicago Heights, IL.

 

Our library is located at 1000 Sterling Avenue in downtown Flossmoor, across the street from the Metra railroad station. (Map)

 

We're hoping to get a really large turnout. Refreshments will be served. Also, I should mention that author Brian Butko will be appearing with Michael Wallis as well.

 

David Martin

Flossmoor Public Library

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...author Brian Butko will be appearing with Michael Wallis as well.

 

David Martin

Flossmoor Public Library

I knew that Brian would be at the Ligonier & Pittsburgh stops but not beyond. I half expected him to post something here himself but I'm sure he's just a little too busy right now.

 

Although I guess I've never seen anything to justify it, I kind of assumed that photographer Michael Williamson would be part of the tour but I'm starting to get the feeling that he's not. Any insight on that, David?

 

And welcome to the forum. Always good to have somebody who knows their way around a library.

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Well, guess what. Brian Butko is doing quite a bit more than the pair of Pennsylvania events that I knew about. After the PA appearances, he will rejoin Wallis in Schererville, IN, and will be with him for the three Illinois stops. Here is a list, from Brian, of his appearances including links to newspaper articles on the Pennsylvania events.

 

Saturday, July 21

Ligonier, PA

Ligonier Beach, 1920s swimming pool

car cruise and signing, 6-8 pm

http://www.post-gazette.com/pg/07200/802656-59.stm

 

 

Sunday, July 22

Pittsburgh, PA

Heinz History Center – my workplace!

Summertime Fun and car cruise 11–3 pm; program at 12 pm

http://www.post-gazette.com/pg/07196/801263-37.stm

 

 

Thursday, July 26

Schererville, Indiana

Teibel's Family Restaurant

Dinner by reservation, 5:30 pm, I'll talk, don’t think they’ll have books available

 

 

Friday, July 27

Flossmoor, Illinois

Flossmoor Public Library, 5 pm, I'll do PowerPoint, not sure if they’ll have books

 

 

Saturday, July 28

Joliet, Illinois

Joliet Area Historical Museum, 9 am, I'll do PowerPoint, signing

 

Franklin Grove

Franklin GrovePublic Library, 1 pm, I'll do PowerPoint, signing

Quite a few opportunities for some excellent Lincoln Highway exposure.

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I knew that Brian would be at the Ligonier & Pittsburgh stops but not beyond. I half expected him to post something here himself but I'm sure he's just a little too busy right now.

 

Although I guess I've never seen anything to justify it, I kind of assumed that photographer Michael Williamson would be part of the tour but I'm starting to get the feeling that he's not. Any insight on that, David?

 

And welcome to the forum. Always good to have somebody who knows their way around a library.

 

 

Michael Williamson IS going to be there, however its my understanding that he will not be making any kind of speech or presentation, preferring (I must suppose) to let the authors do the public speaking. :)

 

I'm hoping we will take part in the booksigning portion of the evening, however. He may just be "along for the ride" :)

 

All of this info is based upon e-mail correspondence with Michael's agent, and the details seem to change every day! But I'm extremely pleased to all three esteemed gentlemen as guests of our library. :)

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Here is a great chance to get to meet two of the great road authors at the same time.

 

I'm planning to be at the Franklin Grove, Illinois stop. Perhaps will follow them out to Clinton, one of our favorite towns along the old LH.

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Here is a great chance to get to meet two of the great road authors at the same time.

And a pretty good photographer, too.

 

I connected with the tour in Pittsburgh and Michael Williamson was right there with the writers. I believe he will be at all the other stops, too. The museum where the event was held happens to currently have a display of Pulitzer Prize winning photos including one of Michael's.

 

I picked up (and had autographed) copies of the Butkos' "Roadside Attractions" and the Michaels' "The Lincoln Highway: Coast to Coast from Times Square to the Golden Gate" but have only peeked inside. Both are calling to me.

 

FlossmoorLibrarian: Williamson did make a short impromptu speech in Pittsburgh but I don't know that will be the case everywhere. I am sure, however, that he will take part in any book signings.

 

For the curious, some photos from the Pittsburgh event are at http://www.dennygibson.com/pitpa072007/day...ex.htm#section5

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FlossmoorLibrarian: Williamson did make a short impromptu speech in Pittsburgh but I don't know that will be the case everywhere. I am sure, however, that he will take part in any book signings.

 

 

Thanks for that info Denny. It looks like people who attend this event get a lot of bang for their buck, so to speak! I'm very excited to have them stopping in our library.

 

Incidentally, you can follow along on the tour via their blog at www.lincolnhighwaybook.com

 

it appears they are updating it daily.

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Incidentally, you can follow along on the tour via their blog at www.lincolnhighwaybook.com

 

it appears they are updating it daily.

Yes and there is an RSS feed, too, although someone's forgotten the headlines on the last three entries. But the meat's still there.

 

And you're right about the "bang for buck". Especially at the stops (including yours) where Brian's along. I wonder if Sarah will be with him in Illinois. You could get three authors and a photographer in one package.

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FlossmoorLibrarian & RoadDog: Any reports on the stops in Flossmorr or Franklin Grove?

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FlossmoorLibrarian & RoadDog: Any reports on the stops in Flossmorr or Franklin Grove?

 

 

The Flossmoor stop was a wonderful experience for all who attended. Anyone who misses this tour should be kicking themselves. Michael Wallis gave an impassioned speech about the Lincoln and its legacy, and encouraging people to keep driving the old roads. The crowd here loved him--I am still getting people walking up to me at work and praising him. He also discussed at length the fact that Flossmoor is located in this triangle of historic roads--the Lincoln, The Dixie, and Route 66 all pass through or nearby. Unbeknownst to me, Michael apparently spent some time as a child in our small town, as he had an aunt and uncle that lived in Flossmoor.

 

Brian Butko served admirably as a "warm-up" act to Wallis' speech (no offense intended, Brian) by presenting an informative and entertaining powerpoint presentation on photography from the Lincoln Highway, as well as Route 66 and other roadside attractions. Unfortunately, due to time constraints, Michael Williamson did not address the crowd formally, but he was there for the book signing. I bought a copy for myself and spent the rest of the weekend reading...

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I haven't even started it and I got Brian's new book, too, plus a new Route 66 book from Dave Clark. Guess I'll be reading all winter.

 

I know we haven't heard whether RoadDog made it to Franklin Grove or not but if he did I hope he got there early enough to get a good seat in the front row.

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Liz and I made it out to Franklin Grove. There were about 25 people there in the brand new library and that structure is really a credit to the community, even though we initially went to the old one, but, not seeing anybody around, we went to the LH Tourisn Center and found out it the book tour was at the "new" library.

 

This building wasn't even officially open and the library director was happy that the tour was running a bit behind as she had to change from her sweaty clothing as she and a local Boy Scout had been doing some landscaping. The scout was working on his Eagle ranking. I thought that was appropriate since it was the scouts who put up all those markers so many years ago.

 

I was right in front of the podium and filmed the whole thing. Michael Wallis spoke first, then Michael Williamson. They were pressed for time so signed books and were out of there for the next stop in Clinton, Iowa.

 

I was impressed that Michael Williamson had his young daughters along with him and he says they are definitely roadies, even at that young age.

 

I had both sign the new book and Wallis signed a copy of his "Mother Road" book.

 

Also enjoyed Brian Butko's talk. He was unable to get the power point presentation to work, so he talked about the name of his book, "Greetings from the Lincoln Highway." He is into postcards and especially likes the ones with writing on the back. He read the many postcard messages he included in his book.

 

I had him sign his "Greetings" book and I also bought his new one about roadside attractions.

 

It's not often you get to meet that many authors and photographers in one place.

 

Keep on Down that Two Lane Highway. --RoadDog

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Sounds like you had a good visit. Like you say, having those three together is extra cool. I don't believe Williamson's daughters were with him in Pittsburgh but I've seen them in photos from other stops.

 

I was being a little devious with my comment about a seat in the front row since I thought it was you in this picture: http://www.lincolnhighwaybook.com/photos/t...s/p7280055.html

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FYI, I'm pleased to announce that anyone who didn't make the tour may pick up Brian's books through American Road's on-line store.

 

:) becky

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Just picked up the book at the local library. I appreciate the size of the book ... it was hard to miss in the "New Non-Fiction" section because it hangs out off the end of the shelf. It more or less just jumped into my hands.

 

So far, my only experience with the Lincoln is a short stretch from its junction with U.S. 41 west into Illinois, then north into Chicago. Bypass the south side that way.

 

From reading this thread, my guess is the book will make me want to start planning the next road trip ...

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