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Keep the Show on the Road!

Advise On What To See On Route 66 In Arizona

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Got too cold and wet at home, so here I am, outside Las Vegas.. Think I’ll try National Old Trails / Mother Road out of Kingman to Peach Springs and on to Williams or Flagstaff tomorrow. Then on toward Santa Fe. Sun is shining, and I welcome any advice. Would like some nice neon signs and roadside artifacts. I’ll check the forum the next couple of days to see if anyone has a swell suggestion orf two.

 

I’ll stop in Kingman mid day tomorrow and pick up a few books. I’m an auto trails guy, but let’s see if I can get my kicks on route 66 as well.

 

Spent a night years ago at Grand Canyon Caverns. Is the motel still there? I had my first hard whiskey at their bar. Wild Turkey. They said it would ward off the rattle snakes and I guess it did as I didn’t see any the next day,

 

I’ll check the forum before I hit the sack and in the AM. Gotta Keep the Show on the Road!

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I think the National Old Trails Road and US-66 were pretty much the same between Kingman and Santa Fe so you can continue being an auto trails guy and just pretend you're on the NOTR rather than Sixty-Six :D I'm guessing that by now you have or are about to pick up those books in Kingman (The Powerhouse is probably a good source.) so aren't looking for the normal suggestions (e.g., Seligman, Hackberry, etc.) and that's about all I could provide.

 

Since I'm so useless when it comes to appropriate "swell suggestions", I tried to make up for it by checking out the Grand Canyon Caverns website. Looks like the motel is still there but on winter hours with calling ahead recommended. (928) 422-3223.

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I think the National Old Trails Road and US-66 were pretty much the same between Kingman and Santa Fe so you can continue being an auto trails guy and just pretend you're on the NOTR rather than Sixty-Six :D I'm guessing that by now you have or are about to pick up those books in Kingman (The Powerhouse is probably a good source.) so aren't looking for the normal suggestions (e.g., Seligman, Hackberry, etc.) and that's about all I could provide.

 

Since I'm so useless when it comes to appropriate "swell suggestions", I tried to make up for it by checking out the Grand Canyon Caverns website. Looks like the motel is still there but on winter hours with calling ahead recommended. (928) 422-3223.

 

You mean I can remain an auto trails virgin and still get a kick on Route 66? Sounds great (swell) to me. Thanks for the suggestion on a good bookstore in Kingman. I’ll stop there.

 

I did pack my 1921 Arizona, etc Automobile Blue Book so I have the National Old Trails directions and I’ll do my usual Then and Now photos if there is an opportunity.

 

I went to the web site you suggested and looked at the motel. I think it is the same color it was in 1962! I remember a bigger dinosaur than is in the pictures, but maybe I’m wrong.

 

Back in ’62 it was a first class stop, and a little spendy for a young couple. I haven’t been on that section of road since then.

 

Thanks for the reply, I really appreciate it, and for helping to Keep the Show on the Road!

 

Dave

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Hi.

 

I'm SOOO jealous. I love that stretch of road.

 

Ok - tell everyone at the Powerhouse hello from American Road.

 

Take a look at the book Route 66: The Romance of the West (I think they carry it there in Kingman so you can flip through it there)-- you'll find some really cool information about Grand Canyon Caverns in there - it was once going to be Dinosaur City. We stayed at the motel there a few years ago - everything was still up and running at that time. And, I haven't heard anything to the contrary.

 

Be SURE to stop at Cool Springs - check out their link on our home page (the full banner at the top) it is a restored service station - and also now a museum - out on the stretch toward Oatman. The owner is a great guy and he won a preservation award for his work on the station.

 

There's a great diner across from the Powerhouse in Kingman - you'll know it when you see it. Really good breakfasts.

 

Have a wonderful time!

 

:D

 

 

 

You mean I can remain an auto trails virgin and still get a kick on Route 66? Sounds great (swell) to me. Thanks for the suggestion on a good bookstore in Kingman. I’ll stop there.

 

I did pack my 1921 Arizona, etc Automobile Blue Book so I have the National Old Trails directions and I’ll do my usual Then and Now photos if there is an opportunity.

 

I went to the web site you suggested and looked at the motel. I think it is the same color it was in 1962! I remember a bigger dinosaur than is in the pictures, but maybe I’m wrong.

 

Back in ’62 it was a first class stop, and a little spendy for a young couple. I haven’t been on that section of road since then.

 

Thanks for the reply, I really appreciate it, and for helping to Keep the Show on the Road!

 

Dave

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Hi.

 

I'm SOOO jealous. I love that stretch of road.

 

Ok - tell everyone at the Powerhouse hello from American Road.

 

Take a look at the book Route 66: The Romance of the West (I think they carry it there in Kingman so you can flip through it there)-- you'll find some really cool information about Grand Canyon Caverns in there - it was once going to be Dinosaur City. We stayed at the motel there a few years ago - everything was still up and running at that time. And, I haven't heard anything to the contrary.

 

Be SURE to stop at Cool Springs - check out their link on our home page (the full banner at the top) it is a restored service station - and also now a museum - out on the stretch toward Oatman. The owner is a great guy and he won a preservation award for his work on the station.

 

There's a great diner across from the Powerhouse in Kingman - you'll know it when you see it. Really good breakfasts.

 

Have a wonderful time!

 

:D

 

Boy, I'm flattered to get advise from you! Thanks!

 

I got your post too late to stop at the diner across from the Powerhouse. Shucks! But we did stop at the Powerhouse.

 

We made it as far as Williams today. One of many highlights in the community is the Fray Marcos Harvey House and AT&SF Depot pictured below built in 1908. Both have been restored and are in use by the Grand Canyon Railroad.

 

WilliamsDepot.jpg

 

You may enjoy seeing the Fray Marcos as rail passengers did in 1915 or 1945, when they stepped off the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe coaches. Click on the link below to see a 360 degree panorama of the Harvey House Hotel , Depot and the tracks that run just north of Route 66.

 

http://www.pair.com/davepaul/americanroad/WilliamsPano.swf

 

We spent time in Kingman and got a few photos of the Brunswick Hotel and the Beale Hotel, great Route 66 and National Old Trails landmarks, noted in my 1921 Automobile Blue Book. In fact there is an ad in the Blue Book for the Beale with a nice interior photo. The Bruswick has been nicely renovated and is worth a stop for a meal.

 

ARKingmanBrunswick500.jpg

 

 

The road between Kingman and Seligman is described in 1921 as …graded to Hackberry, good road through Truxton Canyon to a point 6 miles east of Peach Springs, ten miles of poor rough road through canyon near western end of Yavapai county followed by fair to poor going to Seligman… .. Today it is a beautiful, smooth ribbon of asphalt through lovely desert vistas.

 

At Hackberry we stopped at the General Store run by John Pritchard and his wife. I don’t see why anyone would take the freeway when there are places like this to stop and visit on the American Road! I don’t recall the general store when I came this way in 1962, but it was here. I think John said it was still operating as a general store as late as 1972. John has a nice bookstand of great Route 66 material and tons of memorabilia so I picked up a few items

 

Places like the Hackberry general store are the equivalent of the roadside attractions that lined our two lane roads in days bygone. A must stop. He has a beautiful Corvette parked out front, and several old gas station pumps outside, plus lots of signs. Reminded me of my days as a gas jockey for Associated (Flying A) in the late 50’s. Out front he has lots of Route 66 items and even an Automobile Club of Southern California National Old Trails sign. Does it get better than this?

 

HackberryStore13.jpg

 

We stopped at Valentine. It was the site of the Truxton Canyon Indian School in 1921. The National Old Trails road ran along beside the Aitcheson Topeka and Santa Fe line right in front of the old Indian school. As we were there a Santa Fe freight train screamed by.

 

We stopped at the Caverns Motel at Grand Canyon Caverns, but the dinosaur was gone. It broke my heart. There was a plywood dinosaur at the entrance, but big boo was no more. We spent the night here in 1962, and the place is as I remembered it, paint job and all, minus the dinosaur. Sadly the motel was closed for the winter, or we would have stayed. Great site!

 

We may spend another day in Williams. Lots of Route 66 stuff to see and enjoy. If anyone has a suggestion of what to see, let me know. We will head east toward Santa Fe soon, as we have to Keep the Show on the Road!

Edited by Keep the Show on the Road!

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Hackberry is great. Good people running the store there. I remember when Bob Waldmire ran the Hackberry Store . . . seems a long time ago now!

 

For a blast from the past, be sure to stop in at Twisters in Williams. Tell them hello from us.

 

If you are going to stay another night in Arizona between Williams and Santa Fe, I HIGHLY recommend staying at the La Posada in Winslow. The food at the restaurant is top notch - one of the best meals of my life. It's a blast from the past - they were operating in traditional Fred Harvey fashion during our stay there a few years ago. And, don't forget to stop in at Roadworks - near the famous "Standin' on a Corner." Diane is a sweetheart - and be sure to send our best (you can visit her site right now via the link on our homepage in the bottom left hand corner or via the link on the page for our on-line reader request card ). The Museum in Winslow is a great stop, too. If you've never been to Petrified Forest, it is very worthwhile - 66 used to run right through the park. Too bad some of the old roadside attractions once in that section were demolished. . . I could go on and on about places to see in Arizona and on your way to Santa Fe. But, I don't want to ruin all the fun. But, I will say that another great stop over is the El Rancho in Gallup - a definite must.

 

Enjoy and be sure to keep us posted and send some pics from your trip!

 

:D

 

 

Boy, I'm flattered to get advise from you! Thanks!

 

I got your post too late to stop at the diner across from the Powerhouse. Shucks! But we did stop at the Powerhouse.

 

We made it as far as Williams today. We spent time in Kingman and got a few photos of the Beale and the Beckman Hotels, great Route 66 and National Old Trails landmarks, noted in my 1921 Automobile Blue Book. In fact there is an ad in the Blue Book for the Beale with a nice interior photo.

 

The road between Kingman and Seligman is described in 1921 as …graded to Hackberry, good road through Truxton Canyon to a point 6 miles east of Peach springs, ten miles of poor rough road through canyon near western end of Yavapai county followed by fair to poor going to Seligman… .. Today it is a beautiful, smooth ribbon of asphalt through lovely desert vistas.

 

At Hackberry we stopped at the General Store run by John Pritchard and his wife. I don’t see why anyone would take the freeway when there are places like this to stop and visit on the American Road! I don’t recall the general store when I came this way in 1962, but it was here. I think John said it was still operating as a general store as late as 1972. John has a nice bookstand of great Route 66 material and tons of memorabilia so I picked up a few items

 

Places like the Hackberry general store are the equivalent of the roadside attractions that lined our two lane roads in days bygone. A must stop. He has a beautiful Corvette parked out front, and several old gas station pumps outside, plus lots of signs. Reminded me of my days as a gas jockey for Associated (Flying A) in the late 50’s. Out front he has lots of Route 66 items and even an Automobile Club of Southern California National Old Trails sign. Does it get better than this?

 

We stopped at Vanilla. It was the site of the Truxton Canyon Indian School in 1921. The National Old Trails road ran along beside the Aitcheson Topeka an

 

 

d Santa Fe line right in front of the old Indian school. As we were there a Santa Fe freight train screamed by.

 

We stopped at the Caverns Motel at Grand Canyon Caverns, but the dinosaur was gone. It broke my heart. There was a plywood dinosaur at the entrance, but big boo was no more. We spent the night here in 1962, and the place is as I remembered it, paint job and all, minus the dinosaur. Sadly the motel was closed for the winter, or we would have stayed. Great site!

 

We may spend another day in Williams. Lots of Route 66 stuff to see and enjoy. If anyone has a suggestion of what to see, let me know. We will head east toward Santa Fe soon, as we have to Keep the Show on the Road!

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Ditto! Ditto! Ditto on La Posada. Even if the schedule doesn't allow an overnight there, stop in for a look. It's extremely nice and might be even a hint at what the future holds for El Garces at Needles. El Garces is another former Harvey House and Allan Affeldt, who restored La Posada, has reportedly signed on to help salvage it, too.

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You know the phrase “You should have been here yesterday!” Well that’s how its working with some of our postings. I would have really enjoyed talking with some of the people you folks have mentioned. But we seem to be a day ahead of your good advice

 

But what a blast! I match your great advice, after the fact , with whether we spotted the recommended stop or not.

 

We are in Holbrook this evening. We flashed past Flagstaff. In 1962 it was a good sized village. Today it is a fair sized smaller city. If a place can support both a McDonalds and a Burger King, it is probably too big for me. I know it has lots to offer, but it will have to wait for another trip.

 

We cruised around Winslow and walked the grounds of the La Posada. I got some photos, but we didn’t spend the night. Sheila, (Rose of the Road) and I are traveling on this trip with Bo, the Malamute Wonder Dog. Bo is big (130 pounds) and old (11 years), and not everyone is eager to have him as a guest!

 

LaPosadaExterior14.jpg

 

As you know the La Posada is a great example of the luxury of travel 50 or 75 years ago. The dining room is huge and each table is set with white linen. You could hold a car show in the lobby. It has an Arizona flagstone floor, and exudes the elegance of a time when only the wealthy traveled. (And the rates are very reasonable today.)

 

LaPosadaLobby15.jpg

 

I can imagine the Harvey Girls in their white uniforms waiting on the guests. The girls were often from Midwest farms, and on their own in the untamed west. Of course they were carefully supervised, but it must have been an experience to remember, for the Harvey Girls as well as their guests. It was a different time.

 

The adjacent Winslow depot has the huge beams and interior Moorish arches of traditional Southwest architecture. A wonderful stop, and no doubt a wonderful stay…. without Bo.

 

WinslowDepotLaPosada24.jpg

 

We stopped at the ruins of Two Guns and photographed the Mountain Lion cages. Route 66 crossed the canyon on a nice arched bridge to a large ruined building.

 

TwoGunsMountainLionsFront23.jpg

 

The link below will take you to a 360 degree interactive panorama of Two Guns. You will see the cages for the Mountain Lions (the back side of the picture above). You also will see the Route 66 bridge over the famed Canyon Diablo. You will need broadband.

 

http://www.pair.com/davepaul/americanroad/...nLionMedium.swf

 

We thought we would visit the Meteor Crater, but at $15 per person I figured we would see it on Google Earth instead. But we did visit the Meteor Crater Observatory ruins. The Mother Road is a bit rough along here, but still passable in our sedan. Built in the 1930’s by Harry and Hope Locke, the Observatory was a financial failure. It was leased by Dr. Harvey Nininger in the mid 1940’s. According to Russell Olsen in his book Route 66, Then and Now, Nininger was known for his study of space debris. There is, and was, a tower that visitors climbed up to look through the telescope at the crater. There has to be a great story here!

 

Meteor%20Crater%20Observatory18.jpg

 

Not far east of the Meteor Crater we spotted the Meteor City shop, a classic roadside stop. They have the worlds longest map of Route 66 painted on a wall, and great ambiance! A great stop and free coffee!

 

Meteor%20CityBuilding17.jpg

 

We will peruse Holbrook in the morning, then take a look at the Petrified Forest. We will head toward Gallup, but may not make it there tomorrow, then on to Santa Fe.

 

I really appreciate the advice! In some ways, following Route 66 has been an awakening. I love the auto trails, and always will, but Route 66 preserves some of the glitz and mood of my early traveling days in the 1940’s and 50’s. Just down the road from where we are tonight are teepees to sleep in. If I want an old fashioned burger, with fresh crisp lettuce, a slice of real cheese, onion, tomato and pickles, with mustard to drip down my chin, I’ll find it here. I’ll also find a great low trans fat meal if I choose, but the burger gets my vote, at least for now. This is great travel!

 

I'll try posting some photos shortly. We are doing our best to Keep the Show in the Road!

Edited by Keep the Show on the Road!

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This probably continues the "day late" streak but that may be just as well. East of Holbrook, there is a choice of NOTR routes. I can't put my finger on the details just now but I believe that the Gallup route was sometimes almost impassible (mud?) so a route through Springerville was used. Arizona's Madonna of the Trail is actually in Springerville (although I recall that the choice may have had more to do with people than places). I'm curious as to what that 1921 Blue Book holds regarding the NOTR around there.

 

The reason I said that it might be just as well that this arrives late is that you are hopefully on your way to check out El Rancho and not even thinking about a detour to see one statue (not that there's anything wrong with that:-).

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We stopped at the ruins of Two Guns and photographed the Mountain Lion cages. I did a 360 degree panorama which I’ll post somewhere when I get time.

 

Don't forget you can post images right here on the forum. Just click here for instructions: http://americanroadmagazine.com/forum/index.php?showtopic=28

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Don't forget you can post images right here on the forum. Just click here for instructions: http://americanroadmagazine.com/forum/index.php?showtopic=28

 

 

Thanks! I've done that now but how does anyone know?

 

I appreciate the help and suggestions! That way we can help Keep the Show on the Road!

 

This probably continues the "day late" streak but that may be just as well. East of Holbrook, there is a choice of NOTR routes. I can't put my finger on the details just now but I believe that the Gallup route was sometimes almost impassible (mud?) so a route through Springerville was used. Arizona's Madonna of the Trail is actually in Springerville (although I recall that the choice may have had more to do with people than places). I'm curious as to what that 1921 Blue Book holds regarding the NOTR around there.

 

The reason I said that it might be just as well that this arrives late is that you are hopefully on your way to check out El Rancho and not even thinking about a detour to see one statue (not that there's anything wrong with that:-).

 

The El Rancho! It is fixed in my mind, and not a day late!

 

We are about to get kicked out of the motel in Holbrook as I have lingered to post photos, but I will look at the Auto Blue Book to see what it says regarding your question this evening.

 

Keeping the Show on the Road in Holbrook and eastward

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You are correct - there is quite a story about Meteor Crater, Meteor Crater Observatory, Nininger, Rimmy Jim, and Harry Locke. I love Locke's cartoons of Rimmy Jim . . . there are some reprinted with permission in Romance.

 

I'm enjoying reading about your trip. . . Keep those posts coming.

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You are correct - there is quite a story about Meteor Crater, Meteor Crater Observatory, Nininger, Rimmy Jim, and Harry Locke. I love Locke's cartoons of Rimmy Jim . . . there are some reprinted with permission in Romance.

 

I'm enjoying reading about your trip. . . Keep those posts coming.

 

The adventure continues! We enjoyed a magnificent sunset this evening that displayed the blues and pinks so often seen in photographs of the Southwest.

 

We got your and Denny's advice in time to stop at the El Rancho in Gallup. I told the desk clerk we were there because the folks at American Road Magazine had recommended it as a must see. I got a big smile and a double thumbs up! It was too early to stop for the evening, but we may on our return if we go through Gallup.

 

ElRanchoExterior08.jpg

 

The lobby with its huge stone fireplace is really evocative of the lodges of old, with the elk heads, overstuffed furniture and classic lighting. We agree, it is a must see. I took a few photos of the interior, exterior, and sign, which I will add to the album I have posted here under the name Winter on Route 66.

 

El%20Rancho%20Interior04.jpg

 

Before we reached Gallup we took a couple of hours to visit the Painted Desert and the Petrified Forest. Route 66 went right through what is now the National Park, and is marked by an old car body where it crosses the main park road.

 

I try to bring along the WPA Writer’s Project Guide for the states we travel through. Published in the very late 1930’s or pre war 1940’s they remain wonderful guides even today. The mile by mile descriptions of the scenery along Route 66 in the Arizona book provide wonderful looks into the past.

 

The Guide says of the road here “From the highway are many glimpses of Navaho men riding their scrubby ponies, of Navaho women weaving beside their igloo-shaped hogans, and of their children guarding the sheep.” Not so today, but the scenery is unchanged.

 

We stopped at the Painted Desert Inn, which is part of the National Park, and is well preserved and maintained. The 1940 description of “a pueblo-type structure with varying floor levels” fits today.

 

PaintedDesertInn21.jpg

 

We made a stop at the famed Laguna Pueblo. Route 66 went within a couple of blocks of the historic San Jose De Laguna Church, built in 1699! A local Native American and a friend were chatting outside the mission, and consented to give us a tour of the interior of the venerated building. Paintings on elk hide adorned the alter, and all around the side walls are designs in various colors.

 

Mission219.jpg

 

We are in Santa Fe this evening, on the pre 1937 section of Old Route 66, expecting snow tonight, and trying to Keep the Show on the Road!

Edited by Keep the Show on the Road!

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This probably continues the "day late" streak but that may be just as well. East of Holbrook, there is a choice of NOTR routes. I can't put my finger on the details just now but I believe that the Gallup route was sometimes almost impassible (mud?) so a route through Springerville was used. Arizona's Madonna of the Trail is actually in Springerville (although I recall that the choice may have had more to do with people than places). I'm curious as to what that 1921 Blue Book holds regarding the NOTR around there.

 

The reason I said that it might be just as well that this arrives late is that you are hopefully on your way to check out El Rancho and not even thinking about a detour to see one statue (not that there's anything wrong with that:-).

 

The 1921 Automobile Blue Book doesn’t show a route between Holbrook and Albuquerque, except by way of Hunt, Concho, St Johns, Springerville, and Socorro. Nothing is shown between Holbrook and Gallup.

 

My 1920 Bluebook is at home, but my reproduction 1913 Arizona Road Maps and Tour Book which I took along is also silent regarding a road east from Holbrook toward Gallup. Tibbs may have done some maps of the area which I can check when I get home, and I think I have ACSC strip maps from around 1917 covering the route through Arizona and probably New Mexico.

 

It looks like the main (National Old Trails) route went down through St Johns and Springerville. The Blue Book has a long description of Springerville, the typical Blue Book description of the condition of the road, and of course the turns and landmarks matched to mileage. If you or anyone else request it, I could post the pages involved when I return home..

 

If you have a specific question I might answer, let me know.

 

And thanks again for the great advice, it helps Keep the Show on the Road!

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You've answered my basic question which was "Does the Blue Book show the NOTR through Gallup, Springerville, or both?" A 1925 ACSC map shows just the Springerville route. A map in a 1924 book by Judge J. M. Lowe, or at least carrying his name, shows both routes. Text in the book describes the Gallup route. Again, I know I've read a story or two about this but can't find a thing now. I believe that Gallup was the "proposed" route but that Springerville became the "practical" route because of frequent mud problems on the other one. I'll probably stumble on the Gallup-Springerville story when I'm looking for something on Boston or something else totally unrelated.

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The last leg of the Route 66 adventure is behind us now. It was between Needles and Barstow, as we returned home. Needles was an interesting overnight stop. The El Graces, an abandoned Harvey House was an interesting site.

 

ElGracesSide07.jpg

 

 

Leaving Needles westbound we stopped at Goffs.

 

Goffs.jpg

 

The old schoolhouse at Goffs has been restored and the surrounding grounds made into an outdoor museum. Inside the schoolhouse we met John who serves as a volunteer. John is an enthusiastic and well informed source of old road information. The community, such as it is, is lucky to have him share his time with them.

 

John is 25% of Goffs population! He is a road traveler who has settled in Goffs for an indefinate period to help keep the exceptional museum facility open and prospering.

 

Goffs would be worth a stop if only to see the fine collection of Route 66 and older National Old Trails Signs on the wall.

 

Goffsigns.jpg

 

Goffs began to lose its importance after 1931 when Route 66 was rerouted. The schoolhouse closed and the children were bussed to Essex, several miles away.

 

Every time I have picked up a map of Route 66 I have wondered about the section that swings down through Essex, Danby, Amboy, Bagdad, and Ludlow. I wonder no more. On February 3 we had that section of the Mother Road practically to ourselves.

 

Westbound between Essex and Amboy the road is as smooth as a baby’s bottom, but after the traffic bound for 29 Palms turns south at Amboy, road maintenance takes a dive. None the less it is still a good road and incredibly better than the National Old Trails Road of the teens and early 1920’s.

 

We explored a section of the National Old Trails roadbed southeast of Ludlow where it crossed newer Route 66. The 1921 Automobile Blue Book suggested taking this road at night during the summer months to avoid the heat. It must have been quite an adventure, following a narrow winding trail through sand and volcanic rock in the dark. The road was marked only by the volcanic stones thrown off the roadbed along each side of the one lane track.

 

We took photos of Route 66 landmarks along the way. Some are posted under the topic Route 66 in 3D. Roy’s at Amboy lived up to its advanced billing. The restaurant and motel were closed, but remain an impressive roadside artifact. I understand that Albert Okura, owner of the Juan Pollo restaurant chain is attempting to revitalize Amboy, and Roy’s. The current sign and motel only date back to 1959, but the original owner operated a thriving buisness here during the depression years.

 

RoysAmboy.jpg

 

 

At Newberry Springs, the Bagdad Café where the movie of that name was filmed, turned out to be a bit of a disappointment. It was closed, and as I took a photo a fellow wheeled a dirt bike out the front door. Not exactly what I was expecting!

 

We met the freeway at Ludlow, and headed to Barstow and on north, ending our Route 66 adventure.

Edited by Keep the Show on the Road!

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You've answered my basic question which was "Does the Blue Book show the NOTR through Gallup, Springerville, or both?" A 1925 ACSC map shows just the Springerville route. A map in a 1924 book by Judge J. M. Lowe, or at least carrying his name, shows both routes. Text in the book describes the Gallup route. Again, I know I've read a story or two about this but can't find a thing now. I believe that Gallup was the "proposed" route but that Springerville became the "practical" route because of frequent mud problems on the other one. I'll probably stumble on the Gallup-Springerville story when I'm looking for something on Boston or something else totally unrelated.

 

 

 

I think you are right!

 

I don’t know if this is helpful, but when I got home I looked in my Automobile Blue Books (ABB’s) published before and after the 1921 regional issue (the one I had with me in on the road).

 

The 1918 Volume 7 does show a road between Holbrook AZ and Gallup, NM, and then another on to Albuquerque, even though the early 1920 books don’t. The Gallup route is identified as the National Old Trails route (and is also so identified in my 1926 ABB).

 

 

1918 Map ABB1918V7Map.jpg

 

 

When you read the description (below) of the section between Gallup and Albuquerque in 1918, it is clear why the ABB recommended taking the Springerville route instead! I have never read such a negative description in a time when mud, sand, washes, rough spots, rocks, and the like were routine.

 

1918 Gallup to Albuquerque ABB1918V7Route714.jpg

 

1918 Holbrook to Gallup ABB1918V7Route915.jpg

 

Perhaps (and this is pure speculation) they got scalded in 1918 by the Automobile Club of Southern California who I recall was a supporter of the National Old Trail and rather than alienate the National Old Trail folks and the clubs, they ignored the route until later when it was improved.

 

Incidentally, the 1921 Volume T (Transcontinental) identifies the Holbrook to Springerville and Springerville to Magdalena segments as part of the Santa Fe Trail and doesn’t show the Holbrook Gallup Albuquerque route at all.

 

Thanks for all your help and advice.

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