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Celebrating our two-lane highways of yesteryear…And the joys of driving them today!
Jennifer

Welcome - Please Introduce Yourself!

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I suppose after almost a year on the forum I should introduce myself.

 

My wonderful wife and I live in a tiny house on a small lake out in the country near Olympia, Washington. Our dog, Bo, is too old to chase the deer or the geese....and they know it. The deer come down to pick the apples off the lawn, and Bo just watches these days. Once in awhile he goes out on the dock to watch the ducks...but he no longer goes in the water to chase them. He is a happy old guy, and so am I.

 

I have a large collection of old maps and travel ephemera acquired over 30 years or more, and my love of the two lane roads goes back to the 1940’s. In those days I was the navigator on the family vacations, so I learned to interpret road maps, and to collect them in anticipation of our travels.

 

Later, in my early teens we lived a few blocks from the H.M Gousha headquarters in San Jose, California and I used to ride my bike there and crawl into their incinerator to get the discarded maps and artists’ velums. Can you imagine what those old original map cover velums would be worth today??!

 

I started my career with IBM in the days of the “big iron,” so I have a few years on some of the “youngins” here with computer expertise. Who among you can write programs in machine language on a 1620, or Autocoder on a 1401, not to mention COBOL, yadda yadda? Then I went into teaching at a local community college, and too soon into college administration. I have served as dean, president, chancellor, and state official, in different places and states at different times. I am proud of what I was able to contribute to help young (and often not so young) people achieve their dreams, but I am now as far away from the stress and responsibilities of those jobs as I can get.

 

My wife and I decided that time would be our wealth, so I retired in my mid 50’s when we figured we would have enough money to squeak through our old age...provided we died early!! We travel the two lane roads, take thousands of photos, and I eat too many burgers.

 

I doubt there is a two lane road on any state level map in the western states that I have not been on one time or another. Our hope is that after ‘ole Bo goes (he is 12, or 93 in human years) to do a cross country trip and visit a few of the great places the gang here has introduced me to.

 

I think American Road is a great magazine, and I was a charter subscriber. The forum is lots of fun, and has given me an excuse to take more two lane trips (Thanks AR!).

 

The folks who post here are the finest! I’m hoping that I can make my maps and guides more available as the gang here plans trips, so I am slowly posting a few at historicalroadmaps.com. Other than that, I plan many more trips...and only wish I had more time to keep up with posting them. But someone has to do the driving! It’s a tough job, but I’m up to it!

 

Keep the show on the Road!

 

Dave

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One of my favourite books was _Cheaper by the Dozen_, and there is a mention in that book of the _Automobile Blue Book_.

 

WOW! I read that book ... well, sometime during my public schooling in the 1980s, and I really liked it then. The whole thought of being an efficiency expert just resonated with me. But I thought I had never heard of the ABB before when Keep started talking about them after I joined here. Guess I was wrong!

 

jim

 

 

Who among you can write programs in machine language on a 1620<...>

 

I learned assembler (8-bit, no less) on the PDP 11/70, but that was one of those competing DEC machines!

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...I started my career with IBM in the days of the “big iron,” so I have a few years on some of the “youngins” here with computer expertise. Who among you can write programs in machine language on a 1620, or Autocoder on a 1401, not to mention COBOL, yadda yadda? Then I went into teaching at a local community college, and too soon into college administration...

 

Dave,

Thanks for reminding me about COBOL, although I did most of my programming back at Lehigh U in FORTRAN. I remember submitting packs of punched cards, and then coming back to the computer lab to see if my program, under my code name of Buick8 (I was driving a 52 Buick straight 8 around 1970), had compiled on the school's main frame.

 

This is another lovely memory you have gotten me into...

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Hi everyone! My name is Michele. Obviously new here. I was born and have lived in Indiana all of my life. I grew up loving road trips. I remember a particular trip to Maine where I sat in the front seat of the family station wagon between my parents and had a map of my own that I followed as we drove.

 

I've always preferred a road trip when possible but have never taken one that was focused specifically on a road. That changes this spring. We will be hitting the road and driving US 6. Because of a variety of reasons we are splitting the trip into two separate trips. We will head west from Indiana and drive all the way to Long Beach. Later this fall we will finish our journey by heading east to Cape Cod.

 

Having grown up just a mile off of US 6 in Indiana, I'm familiar with that part of it but would love any tips on things to see if you've been there, done that.

 

Michele

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I was born and have lived in Indiana all of my life.
Oh great. Another Hoosier. :o

 

Actually that is great because the several other Hoosiers on the forum add a lot to it. Welcome aboard.

 

The only bits of US-6 I've ever been on are a stretch in western Pennsylvania and some slivers in Ohio so I won't be much help for your upcoming trip. Hopefully some others will be and maybe I can recommend a spot or two when you head east.

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Hi everyone! My name is Michele. Obviously new here. I was born and have lived in Indiana all of my life. I grew up loving road trips. I remember a particular trip to Maine where I sat in the front seat of the family station wagon between my parents and had a map of my own that I followed as we drove.

 

I've always preferred a road trip when possible but have never taken one that was focused specifically on a road. That changes this spring. We will be hitting the road and driving US 6. Because of a variety of reasons we are splitting the trip into two separate trips. We will head west from Indiana and drive all the way to Long Beach. Later this fall we will finish our journey by heading east to Cape Cod.

 

Having grown up just a mile off of US 6 in Indiana, I'm familiar with that part of it but would love any tips on things to see if you've been there, done that.

 

Michele

 

Hi Michele,

 

Welcome aboard! And, welcome to all the rest of the new Forum members. I apologize for not posting for a while -- it's been really busy in the American Road offices.

 

US 6: A few tips - Be sure to contact the US Route 6 Tourist Association. There is a link to them on our Resources page: http://www.americanroadmagazine.com/resources/resources.html

 

Also, Joe Hurley, a contributing editor to American Road magazine, writes a regular column for us on US Route 6. Additionally, a few years ago, Joe and the photographer who accompanied him on his cross-country walk on US Route 6, did an overview article on US Route 6 (I believe it was in our Summer 2005 issue). You may find the articles useful in helping plan your trip. There is an electronic index of all of our back issues created by American Road subscriber and Forum Member Rick Etchells.

 

Personally, I've been on some great stretches of US 6 (and some bypassed alignments of US 6) in Utah and Nevada. I highly recommend them!

 

Take care and safe travels!

Becky

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Michele,

 

I second Becky’s comments and would be happy to pull from the ole memory banks recollections of the sections of US 6 I have traveled in western Colorado and westward.

 

You will fit into this group nicely (many of us served as family navigator as a kid), and if you have a willingness to share, we would love trip reports on your Route 6 adventures.

 

I will do a little thinking and post a few descriptions of the western part, but I must defer to the experts who really know 6 a lot better than I do.

 

BTW, my next post will be in the US6 forum here so others interested in 6 will see it.

 

Keep the Show on the Road

 

Dave

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Thank you all for the welcome. I hope I can be a worthy contributer to the forum. :)

 

Michele

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I am one of those who got a relatively late start in road-tripping. I grew up in southern Ohio, and by the time I graduated from college in 1965 I had been as far north as Marion, Ohio, as far east as Athens, Ohio, as far south as Lexington, Kentucky, and as far west as Cincinnati. Upon graduation, I extended my boundaries north and west as far as Battle Creek, Michigan when I found a job in that area.

 

Next, Uncle Sam gave me a job, and I finally ended up at Aberdeen, Maryland, where a group of my buddies and I would jump in a car, head out the gate, and if we did not have a destination in mind would flip a coin at various intersections to determine if we turned right or left. One of the sights we found with this method was the Great Falls of the Potomac, which none of us were aware of until that day.

 

When I was released by the army, I decided that I was going to see some of the country west of the Mississippi River before returning to my civilian job. I spent 3 weeks driving to Los Angeles through El Paso, Tucson, and Las Vegas, then to San Francisco by way of Yosemite, then up the coast to Portland, then back to Michigan through first Yellowstone, then the Wisconsin Dells.

 

A couple of years later I spent two weeks touring Colorado and Utah. Then, for about 10 years, I sort of settled into a routine of driving to Florida most years, although I did vary the route each year. For example, about 1975 I realized I had not been in any of the New England states yet; I remedied that by going to Florida by driving through Maine. Also, my only visit to New Orleans was while traveling from Florida back to Michigan.

 

I next married a woman who dislikes the travel; to her, it is something that has to be endured in order to get to the destination, so it should be done as quickly as possible. I do still get to travel the two-lane roads, but just not as often as I would like.

 

I have found this forum to be very interesting, and I hope to be able to make some worthwhile contributions to it.

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Rod,

 

First a big welcome, and I second Jim's comment.

 

I spent 3 weeks driving to Los Angeles through El Paso, Tucson, and Las Vegas, then to San Francisco by way of Yosemite, then up the coast to Portland, then back to Michigan through first Yellowstone, then the Wisconsin Dells.

 

Gees....you missed Washington.. :rolleyes: or maybe not...How did you get from Portland to Yellowstone?

 

I next married a woman who dislikes the travel; to her, it is something that has to be endured in order to get to the destination, so it should be done as quickly as possible. I do still get to travel the two-lane roads, but just not as often as I would like.

 

My wife is not a big road travel fan per se, but she does go along. I have identified over the years her interests, so we stop at antique stores, doll museums, art gallerys, street fairs, etc. She has discovered that the two lane roads lead to the places she likes to see...so she is happy to go. And I have to forgo a few photo ops of old bridges, etc. She is great company, so it is worth the "adjustments."

 

I have found this forum to be very interesting, and I hope to be able to make some worthwhile contributions to it.

 

Yah, we are one big bunch of "interesting" people. If you think you can make some worthwhile contributions, you can...in fact you already have! Like Jim said, hop in.

 

Keep the Show on the Road!

 

Dave

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I next married a woman who dislikes the travel; to her, it is something that has to be endured in order to get to the destination, so it should be done as quickly as possible. I do still get to travel the two-lane roads, but just not as often as I would like.

 

I solved that problem - I live in Memphis; she lives in Maine.

 

Hudsonly,

Alex Burr

Memphis, TN

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Hello all from another "Road Warrior." The given name is Jim and I would describe myself as a two lane highway nut case. My passion is restoring vintage automobiles from the 1950's into the mid 1960's. For fun and enjoyment I hit the old two lanes in one of my restored cars with the top 40 recordings from the '50s & early '60s blaring away through the speakers. Stuck in time? No, but I do get a kick out of finding those eateries and motels still in business from that era. There are many if one hits the right highways. A secondary hobby is collecting old maps, road atlases, and post cards. Living on an almost untainted stretch of U.S. 90 I'll soon be doing a photo essay of the stretch of that highway between Columbus, Texas Westward to Seguin, Texas. Many, many motels, restaurants, and service stations just as they were fifty and even more years ago.

 

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...I would describe myself as a two lane highway nut case.

"There is pleasure in madness that none but madmen know". You should fit in here nicely. Your attraction to old roads, eateries, & motels is shared by most folks here and your passion for old cars is shared by many. There are even a few (not I) with restoration experience. It sounds like you have a good photo project in the works and I, for one, would love to hear about those restored cars.

 

Welcome!

 

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Hello all from another "Road Warrior." The given name is Jim and I would describe myself as a two lane highway nut case. My passion is restoring vintage automobiles from the 1950's into the mid 1960's. For fun and enjoyment I hit the old two lanes in one of my restored cars with the top 40 recordings from the '50s & early '60s blaring away through the speakers. Stuck in time? No, but I do get a kick out of finding those eateries and motels still in business from that era. There are many if one hits the right highways. A secondary hobby is collecting old maps, road atlases, and post cards. Living on an almost untainted stretch of U.S. 90 I'll soon be doing a photo essay of the stretch of that highway between Columbus, Texas Westward to Seguin, Texas. Many, many motels, restaurants, and service stations just as they were fifty and even more years ago.

 

Starfire,

 

First, welcome!

 

You are a lucky fellow! I wish I had the restoration capability…I don’t. But there is nothing better than cruising a two lane with the music of choice giving you a road high. I am renting a convertible for a trip between Key West and Olympia, Washington next month, and I’ll have my favorite music on the radio….count on it.

 

As for US90…we are eager to see your photo essay….don’t hesitate to share it in progress. Any stretch with relatively unchanged roadside architecture is gold. They are getting harder to find.

 

I am an avid map, atlas, and road guide collector myself. I am pretty “thin” on the Texas of the 1940’s and 50’s so whatever you have to share or tell about here will be appreciated.

 

Welcome to the American Road!

 

Keep the Show on the Road!

 

Dave

 

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Thanks guys for the warm welcome!

 

Denny my two favorite vintage cars are a '58 Mercury Montclair and a '62 Oldsmobile Starfire (thus the handle). Restoration works in progress include another '62 Oldsmobile Starfire, a '56 Cadillac Eldorado Seville, and a '57 Cadillac Eldorado Seville. We also have a pair of heavy duty road cruisers in the form of a matching pair of '76 Lincoln Mark IVs (really great road cars). Of course those '50s and '60s cars are not exactly easy on fuel consumption, particularly those Cadillacs which were what I call "luxury factory hot rods" both having been produced with dual 4bbl carburetors and loving premium grade fuel at around 9 mpg tops, down hill with a tail wind.

 

 

Dave, I'll keep you and everyone else up to date on the partial U.S. 90 photo essay I'll be doing. This is really a neat stretch of road as the original alignment is clearly visible where the present alignment replaced portions of it. There are very old bridges with bronze plaques indicating the construction dates on some of the bridges, which are still in use today as county maintained roads. We have many two lane roads in Texas which either are or were formerly U.S. designated highways. Some are absolute treasures. Among those are U.S. 75 (now Texas 75) from Conroe, Texas on the South to just South of Corsicana, Texas to the North......but that is another future photo essay.

 

Dave if your Washington trip will take you through Texas let me know the general route and if you have the time to spend I can put you on some fantastic two lane trips to take as you pass through. Now the folks in Louisiana ain't going to like this but I would recommend you avoid I-10 through Louisiana, the Western parts of it have been in really bad shape in places for years (they have been working on it).

 

Jim

Edited by Starfire

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Denny my two favorite vintage cars are a '58 Mercury Montclair and a '62 Oldsmobile Starfire (thus the handle). Restoration works in progress include another '62 Oldsmobile Starfire, a '56 Cadillac Eldorado Seville, and a '57 Cadillac Eldorado Seville. We also have a pair of heavy duty road cruisers in the form of a matching pair of '76 Lincoln Mark IVs (really great road cars). Of course those '50s and '60s cars are not exactly easy on fuel consumption, particularly those Cadillacs which were what I call "luxury factory hot rods" both having been produced with dual 4bbl carburetors and loving premium grade fuel at around 9 mpg tops, down hill with a tail wind.

Jim

 

Jim,

Welcome to the forum. I have been lax at keeping up to date here as of late due to other hobbies getting in the way, but auto restoration always gets my attention. I don't do much more than some interior work and detailing most of the time on my 1962 car. And road trips have not happened recently, although we are hoping to hit Albuquerque again when our son starts his next phase of training at Kirtland AFB. Most of our recent road trips have revolved around his AF career, but after Kirtland he will be going to Kadena in Okinawa.

 

But keep us informed of your photo project, and your 62 Starfire you are working on now. Welcome.

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Jim,

Welcome to the forum. I have been lax at keeping up to date here as of late due to other hobbies getting in the way, but auto restoration always gets my attention. I don't do much more than some interior work and detailing most of the time on my 1962 car. And road trips have not happened recently, although we are hoping to hit Albuquerque again when our son starts his next phase of training at Kirtland AFB. Most of our recent road trips have revolved around his AF career, but after Kirtland he will be going to Kadena in Okinawa.

 

But keep us informed of your photo project, and your 62 Starfire you are working on now. Welcome.

 

StarFire,

 

I will miss Texas on this trip, but tips on two lane roads never go to waste here. If we can’t make the trip there, we enjoy them vicariously…or is it virtually...whichever! And I should add, this trip will not be on any interstate....from Key West to the Puget Sound...no interstates.

 

And Dave…good to see your mug here…it has been a bit. I hope the weather is getting to the point where you are taking the TR out at least occasionally. I have rented a convertible for a transcontinental trip in April. It can never match a vintage TR, but you gotta take what’s available!

 

StarFire, my high school girlfriend’s father bought a new 1957 or 58 Mercury. I wish I could recall the model. What I remember most was the pride he had in that vehicle. A new car in the neighborhood was a community event. Folks dropped by just to look at it, and on a summer evening it was a stop on everyone’s evening walk.

 

Keep the Show on the Road!

 

Dave

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I hope the weather is getting to the point where you are taking the TR out at least occasionally.

 

Keep the Show on the Road!

 

Dave

 

Dave,

The TR is still in the shop getting transmission work. Too long of a story, but too cold to do much of any driving, and the garage is now filled with baby stuff my daughter has collected for her coming first child. It means lots of clean up projects to be ready for the return of my toy in a few more weeks. :D

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Denny my two favorite vintage cars are a '58 Mercury Montclair and a '62 Oldsmobile Starfire (thus the handle). Restoration works in progress include another '62 Oldsmobile Starfire, a '56 Cadillac Eldorado Seville, and a '57 Cadillac Eldorado Seville. We also have a pair of heavy duty road cruisers in the form of a matching pair of '76 Lincoln Mark IVs (really great road cars). Of course those '50s and '60s cars are not exactly easy on fuel consumption, particularly those Cadillacs which were what I call "luxury factory hot rods" both having been produced with dual 4bbl carburetors and loving premium grade fuel at around 9 mpg tops, down hill with a tail wind.

Nice fleet, especially those Eldorados, although I don't envy you your fuel bill.

 

I've always been attracted to vintage autos but always as an observer and never a player. Lately, however, I've occasionally scanned for sale listings and looked over available 1963 models. I'm not quite yet in a buying mode but kind of expect to be in two or three years. The idea is to drive a fifty year old car along the Lincoln Highway during its 2013 centennial. Of course, doing it in a hundred year old car occured to me but I immediately realized that that was realistically out of reach and reason. But a car half as old as the road would actually be drivable and it seems some rather serviceable vehicles can currently be had for a reasonable price. I'm thinking a six cylinder convertible (Falcon, Corvair, Valiant, etc) would be ideal but I've got plenty of time to shop.

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Nice fleet, especially those Eldorados, although I don't envy you your fuel bill.

 

I've always been attracted to vintage autos but always as an observer and never a player. Lately, however, I've occasionally scanned for sale listings and looked over available 1963 models. I'm not quite yet in a buying mode but kind of expect to be in two or three years. The idea is to drive a fifty year old car along the Lincoln Highway during its 2013 centennial. Of course, doing it in a hundred year old car occured to me but I immediately realized that that was realistically out of reach and reason. But a car half as old as the road would actually be drivable and it seems some rather serviceable vehicles can currently be had for a reasonable price. I'm thinking a six cylinder convertible (Falcon, Corvair, Valiant, etc) would be ideal but I've got plenty of time to shop.

 

Denny the real gas hogs are really not driven that much these days. Usually their trips are limited to no more than 100 miles one way, typically less. Usually just to local car nut gatherings (aka Cruise-ins). If a long distance trip to a classic car event were to be on the schedule, they make the trip on a trailer.

 

You might as well jump into getting that vintage automobile as the water is fine. Just be careful and give whatever you decide upon a really close inspection or have a qualified vintage car appraiser give it a serious look (can be money well spent). Even a 30 year old car can be full of unwanted surprises though it might look fantastic or the seller is claiming some sort of restoration. In all the years I've been messing with vintage cars I have yet to see a single one that was represented as being restored that didn't have hidden issues. One even has to watch those supposedly professionally restored. There is no watchdog over that industry and there are many who hold themselves out as being professional restorers that I wouldn't let touch a lawn mower, much less a car. That's the main reason I do my own restorations. Not only is it much cheaper, but you know exactly what the status of the vehicle is when finished.

 

In the bygone years of two lane highways we traveled from coast to coast in cars which by today's engineering standards would be considered totally unsafe, and many were. However, most vehicles made after World War II have no problem with being driven anywhere anytime in relative safety and comfort once properly restored.

 

I'd stay away from the Corvair simply because they can be a bag of maintenance worms and parts can be hard to come by. Although many of them were basically "fugly" to look at styling wise, a Valiant with a Slant 6 engine is not a bad choice. That engine was/is one tough rascal. But then you can't make a bad mistake with a Falcon of the period. Parts are readily available and cheap. The Falcon could almost be considered a resurrection of the Model T concept. A simple, easy to repair, economical vehicle, which makes it a good choice even today. I would recommend one with a 221 c.i. or 260 c.i. V8 over the six. While a great engine the little 170 c.i. six really has no top end performance and is not really fuel efficient at speeds above 55-60 mph. The six cylinder engine was originally designed to power military tracked personnel carriers in Artic climates and optimum torque, not horsepower or top end fuel efficiency, was the goal.

 

Last, you might want to take a close look at 1963 Ford Fairlane 500 Sport Coupes. Basically the same car as a Falcon but with a more frills and a better ride.

 

Jim

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Heh, Jim, you're gonna wound the pride of one of the moderators here with your Corvair comments! And I must say, the first-year Valiant with its toilet seat ring on the trunklid was an acquired taste in styling, though I can't argue with your assessment of the venerable slant six! ;-)

 

I had a friend in college with a 1963 Comet (Falcon sibling) with a six, and that car was painfully slow. Cars behind him would honk as he crept away from a light. Just awful.

 

jim

Edited by mobilene

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Heh, Jim, you're gonna wound the pride of one of the moderators here with your Corvair comments! And I must say, the first-year Valiant with its toilet seat ring on the trunklid was an acquired taste in styling, though I can't argue with your assessment of the venerable slant six! ;-)

 

I had a friend in college with a 1963 Comet (Falcon sibling) with a six, and that car was painfully slow. Cars behind him would honk as he crept away from a light. Just awful.

 

jim

 

 

I hope I didn't wound anyone. The styling of the Corvair was pretty advanced for it's time as was the "pancake" opposed cylinders engine. Not a darn thing wrong with it as a collectible, but not something I'd personally recommend for a first time vintage car buyer. Even before Ralph Nader had bad things to say about it, the Corvair had maintenance issues. As cars to be picked upon went, the Corvair was far less dangerous from a fire standpoint than the Mustang which had one of the most stupid gas tank arrangements ever used in an automobile. I love the Mustang, even had the first 2+2 delivered in the State of Texas, so please no flames on that comment.

 

Yup, the Mercury Comet was the same car as the Falcon beneath the sheet metal.

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Although a Corvair started high on my list largely because I liked the two I owned, it has moved lower for exactly the reasons you mention. Compared to the straight (even if sometimes slanted) sixes of the period, parts and expertise aren't as common if for no other reason than the engine was used in just the one line. I didn't mention it in my short sample list but the Chevy Six (possibly in a Nova) is another top candidate for me. The guy who works on his Biscayne can work on a Nova, usually with the same parts, just like the Mustang mechanic can deal with Falcons and Comets.

 

I didn't know that about the Ford 6 cylinder's origin. Good info.

 

Forum moderator Pat Bremer has a beautiful '66 Corvair coupe that gets driven on many regional trips. He's heard most of the Corvair lines many time and I'm guessing he's not too easily "wounded". He knows he's not going to walk into a Wal-Mart and get a new fan belt for it.

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Forum moderate Pat Bremer has a beautiful '66 Corvair coupe that gets driven on many regional trips. He's heard most of the Corvair lines many time and I'm guessing he's not too easily "wounded". He knows he's not going to walk int a Wal-Mart and get a new fan belt for it.

 

That is one of the good things about my Triumph...using a Massey-Ferguson tractor motor, I can visit any farm supply :lol: to pick up pats. But with many parts interchanging among the British cars of the period, and through car clubs, etc. parts are readily available for many vintage cars. Now, you may have problems getting a part for your Dymaxion, but I understand there are even parts available for Hudsons, Essexes, and Terraplanes.

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