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Keep the Show on the Road!

1967 Harrah's Auto Collection Color Slides

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I was going through some of my old photos this morning looking for some 1948 shots along the Columbia River Highway, and came upon two boxes of color slides (30 or 40) I took in 1967 of cars in the once famous Harrah’s Auto Collection in Reno. If they would be of interest to anyone, let me know and I will scan them and post them in the gallery or on Flickr.

 

I’m sure the collection was very well documented, so I doubt that these are unique...but maybe there is a sleeper in there.

 

Most of the shots are of one or another car. I didn’t attempt to identify them.

 

UPDATE: Some photos are now posted at the end of this thread..

 

Keep the Show on the Road

 

Dave

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I'd love to see the images.

 

There is intrinsic value in showing your entire collection from the show. However I have more scanning work on-deck, than I care to think about. So I will understand if it takes some time for you to complete the project.

 

Oh you said slides? Does your scanner also do negatives?

Can anyone recommend a good negative scanner?

 

Always looking to make more work for myself.

... Chris

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I'd love to see the images.

 

There is intrinsic value in showing your entire collection from the show. However I have more scanning work on-deck, than I care to think about. So I will understand if it takes some time for you to complete the project.

 

Oh you said slides? Does your scanner also do negatives?

Can anyone recommend a good negative scanner?

 

Always looking to make more work for myself.

... Chris

 

Chris,

 

I’ll scan them for you and Alex. Be advised that the lens was a coca cola bottle glass 11!

 

 

Here is my two bits worth on scanners..

 

My old Epson 2400 Photo scans everything, and does it well for “advanced amateur” use.....slides, color and BW negatives, prints, etc. It has a light in the lid that shines through 35mm sized film. It is easy to produce 8 X 10’s that have the Wow! factor for me, family and friends. (It probably wouldn’t get a Wow from a Roadhound quality image maker...so ask him his advice.)

 

There are many other good scanners, but I think Epson is the standard of scanners, and has a big enough product line to satisfy most budgets, even mine! You want a USB 2.0 interface, and at least 2400 native (not interpolated) resolution. Beyond that you are paying for speed, software, or semi pro features.

 

Yah, tell me about the making work thing....I am going to have to hire help to keep up with my hobbies!!

 

Keep the Show on the Road!

 

Dave

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I'd love to see the images.

 

There is intrinsic value in showing your entire collection from the show. However I have more scanning work on-deck, than I care to think about. So I will understand if it takes some time for you to complete the project.

 

Oh you said slides? Does your scanner also do negatives?

Can anyone recommend a good negative scanner?

 

Always looking to make more work for myself.

... Chris

 

Chris,

 

Like Keep I have an Epson 2400 scanner. Its a good device that can do good quality scans of prints, slides, and negatives. I used it for quite a while but quickly tired of editing dust spots that were picked up by the scanner.

 

If you can afford it I highly recommmend the Minolta DimageScan 5400. This device is about 3x the price of the Epson and will only do 35mm slides and negatives. What makes the DimageScan worth the extra cost is the ICE technology that it uses. ICE is a process within the scanner that eliminates any dust spots on the image while it scans. I have scanned slides that were fairly dirty and it eliminated all the dust spots. What you pay for in $$$ you get back in time saved editing later on. Oh yeah, it does a good job in sharpness and capturing color too.

 

Roadhound

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OK.... by “popular demand” (that means Alex and Chris) here are some vintage autos photographed in June 1967 at Harrah’s Collection, before it was disassembled.

 

Think of this...the girl in the stripped shirt who is about 10 years old in the photo is probably making retirement plans today!!

 

Demand more and you will get a few more. These were scanned on the Epson 2400 Photo from color slides that had turned purple, and were originally taken with a 110 brownie.

 

Keep the Show on the Road

 

Dave

 

ARSign.jpg

 

ARUnknown2.jpg

 

ARUnknown1.jpg

 

AREssex.jpg

 

ARMaybeOlds.jpg

 

ARMaybeOldsBack.jpg

 

ARStanley.jpg

 

ARFranklin.jpg

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Chris,

 

Like Keep I have an Epson 2400 scanner. Its a good device that can do good quality scans of prints, slides, and negatives. I used it for quite a while but quickly tired of editing dust spots that were picked up by the scanner.

 

(snip)

 

Roadhound

 

 

 

Thanks for the advice.

My old Epson 1200U does a nice job. But I'd like to dig out some slides and reproduce those.

Slipping further off-topic. Try a Google search for "Scanner Photography" to find links like these.

 

http://www.katinkamatson.com/

http://www.kurtnovak.com/

 

I've made a box out of black poster board and experimented with this craft myself. Things clipped from my garden mostly. But found objects photograph well, for printing and use as decopodge' trompe l'oeil.

 

 

 

Cheers!

... Chris

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OK.... by "popular demand" (that means Alex and Chris) here are some vintage autos photographed in June 1967 at Harrah's Collection, before it was disassembled.

 

Think of this...the girl in the stripped shirt who is about 10 years old in the photo is probably making retirement plans today!!

 

Demand more and you will get a few more. These were scanned on the Epson 2400 Photo from color slides that had turned purple, and were originally taken with a 110 brownie.

 

Keep the Show on the Road

 

Dave

 

 

 

Thanks Dave,

My guess, that first car is a doosie of a "Duesi". And I'm betting Alex will reply to the Essex, with more info than we care to know, lol. That Stanley Steamer is the predecessor to today's Hydrogen Prototypes, nyuk! nyuk! nyuk! nyuk! . . . .

 

Drive on ...

... Chris

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I also saw a couple of Franklins in your slide exhibit.

 

I really like my Minolta Dimage Scan Dual III model AF-2840. Too bad Minolta was bought out and now the best available is much more expensive Nikon model. I found my Dimage through Amazon as a reconditioned unit. It works great, and I use my air brush from my spray booth to clean the slides and negatives before scanning. Saves a lot of time on the back end.

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Yeah, the first one looks like a Dusenberg; the Essex is an Essex 4 1919-1923 era, possibly a 1922 Coach; the green shovel nose job at the end is probably around a 1914 Franklin. The Stanley is obvious - in their day those cars were very fast - one of the Stanley brothers ran one at Ormand Beach at somewhere around 100, 105 back in the late teens or 20's.

Not sure what the RHD under the Essex is.

 

Hudsonly,

Alex Burr

Memphis, TN

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Not sure what the RHD under the Essex is.
I've almost convinced myself that I can make out "Olds..." on the grill and the car even looks a bit like the 1911 model pictured near the bottom of this page. My guess is a merry Oldsmobile.

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My goodness, those pics were taken two months before I was born! They are great to see at any rate.

 

I saw a collection here in Indy once that includes a Stanley Steemer. I remember it being whole lot bigger than the one in your photo, but no less funny-looking.

 

Weren't Franklins air-cooled?

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I've almost convinced myself that I can make out "Olds..." on the grill and the car even looks a bit like the 1911 model pictured near the bottom of this page. My guess is a merry Oldsmobile.

 

Denny,

 

I would even go a little further and say they are probably one and the same cars. They look identical, and how many of those can be around?

 

Keep the Show on the Road!

 

Dave

 

My goodness, those pics were taken two months before I was born! They are great to see at any rate.

 

I saw a collection here in Indy once that includes a Stanley Steemer. I remember it being whole lot bigger than the one in your photo, but no less funny-looking.

 

Weren't Franklins air-cooled?

 

Mobilene,

 

Yah, I took those photos so when you grew up, you'd be able to see the collection!! :lol:

 

And how old were you when you saw the Stanley Steamer? If you were still a little squirt, things looked bigger. :rolleyes:

 

As for the Franklin, ask Alex....... he was probably around when they built them! :blink:

 

Keep the Show on the Road!

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My goodness, those pics were taken two months before I was born! They are great to see at any rate.

 

I saw a collection here in Indy once that includes a Stanley Steemer. I remember it being whole lot bigger than the one in your photo, but no less funny-looking.

 

Weren't Franklins air-cooled?

 

 

Franklins (1902-1934) were not only air-cooled, but one of the most successful of the air-cooled makes. Also, in a 1917 economy run 179 Franklins averaged 40.3 mpg. Highly impressive for the day.

 

Hudsonly,

Alex Burr

Memphis, TN

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Yah, I took those photos so when you grew up, you'd be able to see the collection!! :lol:

 

Nice to know you've always got my back!

 

And how old were you when you saw the Stanley Steamer? If you were still a little squirt, things looked bigger. :rolleyes:

 

I was 34, but I *have* grown up a lot since then.

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Keep,

 

Thanks for the pictures! I am sorry to have missed your post asking if we wanted to see them or not.

 

That Olds makes me glad my ignition is inside the car. I'm lazy enough as it is without having to get near the ground on cold or hot days. That colour is enough to make up for the crank, though.

 

It looks like the Stanley's owner had a liking of John Deere.

 

If I were younger and next to a Franklin, I'd probably slide down the hood as one would do a bannister.

 

Thanks again for the visit to 1967. It is amazing how far cars have advanced just in the past 100 years; even by 1967, they were very different machines from the ones at Harrah's.

 

Tracy

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"It looks like the Stanley's owner had a liking of John Deere."

 

Actually, that green was a factory color for Stanley cars. And being a Harrah's car it is accurate - Harrah's had a research library that an old car nut would die for.

 

Hudsonly,

Alex Burr

Memphis, TN

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