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Riding & Tying

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Recently while reading a book "The Story of the American Roads" I discovered something interesting.

It seems that on the "Boston Post Road" that an arrangement was made for travelers to share Horses.

It was called Ride and Tying. Most people walked so they evolved a way most people could share a horse. One couple could ride a horse a certain distance, tie it to a tree, and then go by foot. The people behind would reach the horse, climb on, ride along the trail, pass their friends on foot, then tie the horse to a tree, go on by foot. The friends would reach the horse, climb on and etc., etc., etc. Everybody got a chance to ride.

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I've read that this was used quite a bit by the men heading north on the Natchez Trace after delivering their cargo to Natchez or New Orleans. Boats carried the goods downstream then were generally pulled apart for the lumber. The crews would head north for another load and most would be on foot. It was a lucky man who could share a horse with a buddy by "Riding & Tying". Each man only had to walk half the way and even the horse got a break while waiting for the trailing partner to catch up.

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I've read that this was used quite a bit by the men heading north on the Natchez Trace after delivering their cargo to Natchez or New Orleans. Boats carried the goods downstream then were generally pulled apart for the lumber. The crews would head north for another load and most would be on foot. It was a lucky man who could share a horse with a buddy by "Riding & Tying". Each man only had to walk half the way and even the horse got a break while waiting for the trailing partner to catch up.

 

I remember reading about this practice on the trails in Oregon going from the Willamette Valley to the Coast. As you get thoroughly seeped in the two lane roads, it is hard not to pick up some of the old pre automobile travel characteristics and stories.

 

Another story that always brings a chuckle is what you did when two wagons met in a place where neither could go around or back up, as on a narrow road on a hill. One party had to disassemble their wagon and either stack it on the side or carry the parts around the other. No wonder the horses had bells to warn of their approach!

 

Let’s Keep the Show on the Road!

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Didn't they try something similar, but with bicycles, in Seattle a few years ago? Bikes were left around the downtown area, and if you saw one you could ride it to your destination and leave it for the next person who needed it. jim

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Didn't they try something similar, but with bicycles, in Seattle a few years ago? Bikes were left around the downtown area, and if you saw one you could ride it to your destination and leave it for the next person who needed it. jim

 

What were the results in Seattle? Just curious. . .

 

:D

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It's been a long time since I read the article. If I recall correctly there was mixed success, with some bikes being stolen. I tried to search for info about it on the Net, but a couple minutes of searching didn't turn up anything. Wish I remembered more. jim

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It's been a long time since I read the article. If I recall correctly there was mixed success, with some bikes being stolen. I tried to search for info about it on the Net, but a couple minutes of searching didn't turn up anything. Wish I remembered more. jim

 

 

Thanks for checking. You captured my interest. We lived in the Seattle area for a number of years - so I was curious.

 

:) Becky

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