Jump to content
American Road Magazine
Celebrating our two-lane highways of yesteryear…And the joys of driving them today!
Jack B

Rv'ing On The American Road

Recommended Posts

Well, it's not really Kevin and Jack against the rest, but let me add a couple of items to Kevin's defense:

 

If you travel only at certain times you can turn your insurance on and off like motorcycle riders do.

When not in use for extended periods insure the RV like property. IF your agent allows.

You can finance for 15 yrs, usually, and, if you live in it at least two weeks a year (which we do easily) the interest can be subtracted on your Federal Income Tax as a second or summer home. Just like your primary home mortgage.

 

Most full time RV'ers, those that retire and hit the road as a life, choose a domicile state with little or no taxes. Some states, So. Dakota, Texas, and Oregon are a few, actually cater to out of state residents. I know that sounds like a contradiction. Mail forwarding services place themselves in these states to give you an address, then you register your vehicle there. Some states still do not have state income tax and Montana has no sales tax. So choosing a state base, if the homestead is sold and the RV is it, can be worth a great deal of money.

 

As others have pointed out it's up to what you're looking for, but I might add: it's how you plan to travel too.

If you are just pulling in for the night, because you have a destination in mind, just plug in power, that's it. You have your own water and toilet or can use the facilities at the RV park. A couple of years ago we went to New Brunswick by entering in Michigan and then crossing Canada to New Brunswick. We just stopped nightly and didn't plug anything in but power, till we entered NB and headed for the coast and the Bay of Fundy to see the tides. Then we stayed two or three days in each place totally hooked up. Emptying the tanks is merely a matter of pulling a gate valve, easy.

 

Oh, and for "Keep the Show....." If you bought an RV you'd never sell it, you'd be too busy planning your next trip. We bought our 30', Class C six years ago to take the kids to Disney World in Orlando because we don't fly. We thought if we resold it as soon as we got back we'd get back most of our money. We've been traveling ever since.

 

And one PS: if anyone considers trailers or 5th wheels, don't forget it is against the law in most states to ride in them. With an RV my wife asks, "do you want me to make coffee?" Sure! So while I drive she makes coffee and fixes lunch. It sure ain't camping!!

 

Jack Burke

DeKalb, Illinois

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I love reading this thread! Everybody is right...for their lifestyle. I can see each image, and could see myself doing it...some of the time.

 

And then there is the motel, which we now do a lot.

 

I agree that tenting is pretty rugged for the chorological high achievers. My wife and I tried it about five years ago by borrowing the kids’ gear. When some jerk pulled into the campground at 2AM, started a camp fire, and sat around talking and drinking, my fantasies about camping were over.

 

 

 

Either we get a house sitter and leave Bo home, or take him with us. We will not stay another night in a motel doggy room. They may add a $25 cleaning fee to your room bill, but it doesn’t go for cleaning.

 

So, lets assume that we RV it. I don’t want an RV for life. I would sell it when we get back. So lets assume I buy one with 25,000 miles on it and put another 12,000 on it in 3 months. Suppose I pay $35,000 for it. That means I will pay $3000 in tax and I will assume $5000 in depreciation and repairs. So I am out $8000 for the vehicle. At 5mpg, gas at $2.75 is going to cost $6600. Overnights at $20 each for 90 days is $1800. Aside from food, that is $12,800

 

Now lets use the family car and leave bo with the house sitter instead. Let’s put the motel with tax at $100 a night or $9000 and gasoline is $1100 at my 30mpg. Depreciation on my car will be $1000. So that is $11,100.

 

I think eating in or out is a wash. Obviously eating in the RV is less expensive, but then there is the cooking and clean up, etc. And if you really want cheap, use the fringe and microwave in the motel room. If you want to add $20 a day to the food budget for eating out over eating in, the comparison is still a wash.

 

And that surprised me, a lot. Because every other time I have done the numbers, it was cheaper by motel.

 

But I contend that the issue isn’t cost anyway, because you could cut either of my numbers almost in half by your assumptions. Buy a $10,000 RV or stay at Motel 6. Both will work, and change the computations dramatically.

 

So I contend that the bottom line is to match your method to your madness.

 

If I’m right, then what we could discuss is what we do that makes our preferred approch work for us. I would like to hear about a night or two from the big RV group. What is it like? For example, I have friends who have a big one like Kevins or Jacks, who pull a PT Cruiser, and like to stay at hot springs. That sounds sweet to me. We have other friends who pull a 5th wheeler. He puts on a magic show for the neighbors and he always draws a crowd. What a way to make friends!

 

Any replies?

 

Keep the Show on the Road!

 

 

Yes, there is 2 sides to this! I think most important, is Bo. A dog, I would think? Try dogfriendly.com. It shows friendly places to dine, dogfriendly places to motel overnight, dogfriendly RV parks & dog activities.

 

MY wife & I on our quick runs to Oregon do overnight at Quinta Inn. The dogs do get distracted witht he doors of the other rooms & other noises. We do a 'mindset' expect that type of thing will happen & still enjoy the trip.

 

La Quinta offers a continental breakfast & some will bring their dogs down at that time. This point where conversations can be made. But, most did not travel by car but flew & are in for business. Still small talk can lead to some great dialog.

 

I do not advocate buying a motorhome for one trip. There is a lot to learn & things do break. If not mechanically inclined, this will become a trip to nowhere fun. However, there are a number of RVers that are more than willing to provide good advice & help if they find out you are new to RVing.

 

There are 2 websites to check parks (http://www.rvparkreviews.com/) & service (http://rvservicereviews.com/Index.asp).

 

Be willing to think about keeping & using the RV. Please note,nothing will age an RV more than non use,inside & out.

 

Kevin

 

Read Jack Burke's post above for some good ideas.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh, to: "brownwho63"

 

I'm 64, so I guess I'm a senior, my wife is younger but has MS and so requires extra rest and more comforts than camping. Believe me, try Rv'ing, you'll be a youngster compared to the ages at most of the RV parks you stop at during your travels. I looked at your red 'vette pictured in your profile, it's cool.

You would trailer it with a cover, not tow it four-wheels-down. I also like your dog, hope mine looks like a traveler. Actually he likes to sleep right next to the LP gas "sniffer" and set off the alarm.

 

Jack Burke

DeKalb, Illinois

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You could describe me as an "RV-wannabe."

 

I've never been camping, never went on vacation in an RV. I have had an opportunity to travel in someone else's RV, but that was just a way to transport a group of people across the state in one vehicle. I do echo Jack's comment about making coffee while on the road. It was nice to be able to sit at the table and play cards, or get up and go to the bathroom without having to stop at a gas station or rest area, so that's definitely one of the benefits of a motorhome (and the exact reason why I would choose motorized over a fifth wheel or camping trailer).

 

Now, while some of you are cruisin' in corvettes or a restored '57 Chevy, I'm still driving the '93 Chevy Astro Mini-Van I've had for a dozen years. I swore, though, that when I got rid of it, I would be buying a camper van, something that could be driven around town, to and from work or to the grocery store, yet still be capable of serving as an RV. A couple of years ago, after much study and a trip to the annual RV show in Chicago, the girlfriend and I had set our sights on a Roadtrek. The plan was to buy a Roadtrek, keep it for a couple of years and, if we really liked the whole camping/RVing thing, we would then trade up to a Class C. My son was probably 6 at the time and could easily sleep in the captain's chairs that swiveled around to make another bed.

 

Unfortunately, our financial situation changed and we weren't able to buy one as soon as we'd hoped. And now that my son is older, I think a van is out of the question--it would be fine for Susan and I, but not for all three of us. So, when it happens, I'm sure we'll be buying a Class C.

 

One final comment, although this has been debated thoroughly already in this thread ... last year we visited Chattanooga, Tennessee and stayed at a hotel on U.S. 41 just about at the foot of Lookout Mountain. When we got to our room and looked out the window there was a brand-new Wal-Mart (a Grand Opening sign was still attached to the side of the building) behind the hotel. In the parking lot sat a large Class C motorhome. Three days later as we packed up our suitcases and headed out for another leg of our trip the Class C was still sitting in the Wal-Mart lot. As I got to the car with our bill in hand, I looked at Susan and said "We just paid more than $300 for three nights in this hotel (which was a decent hotel ... Baymont, I believe). Those people over in the Wal-Mart lot haven't paid a cent for the last three nights." My point here is, if you travel a lot, say a couple of week-long vacations a year and several long weekend or at least overnight trips, I would think those cost numbers would start to favor RV'ing rather than being a wash, especially if you cut costs some of the time like those folks in the RV at Chattanooga.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
One final comment, although this has been debated thoroughly already in this thread ... last year we visited Chattanooga, Tennessee and stayed at a hotel on U.S. 41 just about at the foot of Lookout Mountain. When we got to our room and looked out the window there was a brand-new Wal-Mart (a Grand Opening sign was still attached to the side of the building) behind the hotel. In the parking lot sat a large Class C motorhome. Three days later as we packed up our suitcases and headed out for another leg of our trip the Class C was still sitting in the Wal-Mart lot. As I got to the car with our bill in hand, I looked at Susan and said "We just paid more than $300 for three nights in this hotel (which was a decent hotel ... Baymont, I believe). Those people over in the Wal-Mart lot haven't paid a cent for the last three nights." My point here is, if you travel a lot, say a couple of week-long vacations a year and several long weekend or at least overnight trips, I would think those cost numbers would start to favor RV'ing rather than being a wash, especially if you cut costs some of the time like those folks in the RV at Chattanooga.

 

I've heard somewhere that most Wal*Marts have an RV-friendly policy of some sort of letting RVers park overnight in their parking lots. One site I read said about 9 out of 10 stores have this policy.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
You could describe me as an "RV-wannabe."

 

headed out for another leg of our trip the Class C was still sitting in the Wal-Mart lot. As I got to the car with our bill in hand, I looked at Susan and said "We just paid more than $300 for three nights in this hotel (which was a decent hotel ... Baymont, I believe). Those people over in the Wal-Mart lot haven't paid a cent for the last three nights.

 

Most Walmarts welcome overnight parking & not RVing. his has become a problem for some cities & Walmarts that usually ends up creating a no overnight parking ban.

 

Unless there is a mechanical issue, one night should be the limit. No BBQs or lawn chairs out or awnings pulled out.

 

Walmart is great for pulling in late in the afternoon & being gone before the buisness day rush & leaving the area where parked, better than I found it.

 

However, there is nothing to stop one from moving their RV to another business lot with their approval. In fact, we've stayed in a church parking lot mid week w/o an issue when campgrounds were not available.

 

One other note. The Route 66 Casino in New Mexico is good for parking. And, does allow a view of the Rio Puerco Bridge.

 

Kevin

Edited by Kevin

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just found this forum through the demise of a diner thanks to Roadmaven.

 

I have a Class B motorhome or B Van, or Camper Van, or touring coach or whatever you may want to call it. I love it. I can drive it anywhere and in fact I prefer the blue highways over the freeways. I can also park it almost anywhere since it will fit in most parking spots. It has a two-burner gas range, microwave, refrigerator, sink, built-in coffeemaker, bathroom with vanity, flat screen TV/DVD, electric sofa that turns down into a queen size bed, air-conditioning, gas furnace, hotwater tank, and generator all in the same footprint of a crew cab long bed pickup truck. The engine is a 5 cylinder Mercedes Benz diesel and gets a true 22 mpg and a high of around 24 mpg when traveling the blue highways at 55 mph. That is my preference. It seems plenty big for two of us and pure luxury compared to 40 years of tent camping.

 

This past season from April to October we put on over 14,000 miles out 50 nights. Only 24 of those nights were spent in campgrounds. We stayed with friends and relatives a lot around the country and even a few nights in motels. We enjoy the flexibility in that regard.

 

My quests take me to the north woods of Minnesota, Wisconsin and Michigan a lot. I also travel to my hometown for the Indy 500 and Brickyard 400 races every year in Speedway, IN. This coming year we will rally with over 50 other B vanners in the Hocking Hills area of Ohio and Niobrara State Park in Nebraska. We hope to strike out this late winter or early spring for New Mexico and Arizona. Maybe the following year we will head to Alaska. If not we are definitely heading to the Rockies and will be able to travel the Going to the Sun road in Glacier National Park.

 

What I do a lot of is pursue breaded pork tenderloin sandwiches. I've sampled over 80 in diners and restaurants in Indiana, Ohio, Illinois, Iowa, Wisconsin, Missouri, Virginia and Texas over the past two years.

 

It is a great way to hit the American road as far as I am concerned.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
What I do a lot of is pursue breaded pork tenderloin sandwiches. I've sampled over 80 in diners and restaurants in Indiana, Ohio, Illinois, Iowa, Wisconsin, Missouri, Virginia and Texas over the past two years.

 

It is a great way to hit the American road as far as I am concerned.

I guess I'm on somewhat of a similar track. I actually am on a quest to review Reuben sandwiches and do so on my Reuben Realm web site. I've got 110 Reuben reviews posted so far. Next week, WFYI is scheduled to tape me for a segment on their Across Indiana television program.

 

Chris

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I guess I'm on somewhat of a similar track. I actually am on a quest to review Reuben sandwiches and do so on my Reuben Realm web site. I've got 110 Reuben reviews posted so far. Next week, WFYI is scheduled to tape me for a segment on their Across Indiana television program.

 

Chris

Chris,

 

I've been to your site. I think it is great.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I guess I'm on somewhat of a similar track. I actually am on a quest to review Reuben sandwiches and do so on my Reuben Realm web site. I've got 110 Reuben reviews posted so far. Next week, WFYI is scheduled to tape me for a segment on their Across Indiana television program.

 

Chris

Chris,

 

WOW! You are the man when it comes to reubens! Love em, but never rated them. Do you have rating criteria, or is it up to the individual and sort of subjective?

 

I can see there is a need for a western rater! I might be your man :lol: !

 

Keep the Show on the Road! Dave

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I just found this forum through the demise of a diner thanks to Roadmaven.

 

I have a Class B motorhome or B Van, or Camper Van, or touring coach or whatever you may want to call it. I love it. I can drive it anywhere and in fact I prefer the blue highways over the freeways. I can also park it almost anywhere since it will fit in most parking spots. It has a two-burner gas range, microwave, refrigerator, sink, built-in coffeemaker, bathroom with vanity, flat screen TV/DVD, electric sofa that turns down into a queen size bed, air-conditioning, gas furnace, hotwater tank, and generator all in the same footprint of a crew cab long bed pickup truck. The engine is a 5 cylinder Mercedes Benz diesel and gets a true 22 mpg and a high of around 24 mpg when traveling the blue highways at 55 mph. That is my preference. It seems plenty big for two of us and pure luxury compared to 40 years of tent camping.

 

This past season from April to October we put on over 14,000 miles out 50 nights. Only 24 of those nights were spent in campgrounds. We stayed with friends and relatives a lot around the country and even a few nights in motels. We enjoy the flexibility in that regard.

 

My quests take me to the north woods of Minnesota, Wisconsin and Michigan a lot. I also travel to my hometown for the Indy 500 and Brickyard 400 races every year in Speedway, IN. This coming year we will rally with over 50 other B vanners in the Hocking Hills area of Ohio and Niobrara State Park in Nebraska. We hope to strike out this late winter or early spring for New Mexico and Arizona. Maybe the following year we will head to Alaska. If not we are definitely heading to the Rockies and will be able to travel the Going to the Sun road in Glacier National Park.

 

What I do a lot of is pursue breaded pork tenderloin sandwiches. I've sampled over 80 in diners and restaurants in Indiana, Ohio, Illinois, Iowa, Wisconsin, Missouri, Virginia and Texas over the past two years.

 

It is a great way to hit the American road as far as I am concerned.

 

Davydd,

 

I'm glad to see someone praise the Class B van. I think they are perfect in most ways. We owned one for several years. I took mine on rutted mountain roads and expressways, just about anywhere I would have been able to go in the family sedan. Easy to drive, park anywhere, sleep in comfort, quick to get back on the road, etc. Great choice!

 

Everything was perfect except one thing, and it finally was its demise...my wife "needs her space." We honestly thought about towing a trailer....but come on. Even now, I look at one on the road like I used to look at red sports cars.

 

Keep the Show on the Road! Dave

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
WOW! You are the man when it comes to reubens! Love em, but never rated them. Do you have rating criteria, or is it up to the individual and sort of subjective?

 

I can see there is a need for a western rater! I might be your man :lol: !

 

Keep the Show on the Road! Dave

Just download one of my "Reubens on the Road" review forms (Review Forms and fill it out. It's mostly subjective. I usually measure them and photograph them to get some stats, but when it comes to the letter grades for different categories, it's just up to the individual.

 

I've had individuals and small groups get together and send in some reviews before. Just take some photos (one of the exterior of the restaurant, one of the Reuben and one of the dining area/diners if possible) and send in the rating form!

 

Chris

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I'm imagining a deluge of reviews from the Northwest....
Perhaps with video of the actual devouring. :lol:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Finally, something I am truly qualified to do! And I have a passion for the work. Does it get any better?!

 

I’m thinking maybe I should “warm up,” so to speak ,before I do any reviews...kind of a trial run..a pilot test...

 

Video...that’s good...but better yet...stop frame...Will I need a GPS?

 

It’s 7:30 AM. Is it wrong to ask for a Reuben for breakfast?

 

Keep theShow on the Road! Dave

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Davydd,

 

I'm glad to see someone praise the Class B van. I think they are perfect in most ways. We owned one for several years. I took mine on rutted mountain roads and expressways, just about anywhere I would have been able to go in the family sedan. Easy to drive, park anywhere, sleep in comfort, quick to get back on the road, etc. Great choice!

 

Everything was perfect except one thing, and it finally was its demise...my wife "needs her space." We honestly thought about towing a trailer....but come on. Even now, I look at one on the road like I used to look at red sports cars.

 

Keep the Show on the Road! Dave

Dave,

 

I was not impressed with most B vans until they started converting the Sprinters. Have you looked at them? I think they feel a lot more comfortable inside. The major manufacturers are Pleasure-Way, Leisure Travel Vans, Great West Vans and Roadtrek, all Canadian converters with good quality. Winnebago Industries will start selling them in March. Mine can be viewed via the web link in my signature along with my pork tenderloin sandwich web site.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My RV is in the drive now covered with a form fitting bag and lots of snow. I thought this forum would be quiet till Spring too. Who knew food would kick it off again. Class B's are very cool. Remember the custom party vans of the 60's with the shag carpet, plush velours, and murals? They've come a long way! My loyalty to Class C's is harder to explain...I like to drive from a truck cab; I like a hood in front of me.

 

But I have a food to toss in the mix: chicken fried steak with gravy. We usually cook in our RV, my wife prefers it. But whenever we dine on the road, I scan the menu for chicken fried steak.

 

We did take one Autum trip before pumping the RV full of antifreeze. My wife said she wanted to go somewhere she'd never been. We went to Keokuk, Iowa! Actually we enjoyed the town and area very much.

It is a very old river town at the confluance of two rivers. There is a lot of history and grand, old river front homes. It would make a good road trip.

 

Have fun with your food

 

Jack Burke

DeKalb, Illinois

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just download one of my "Reubens on the Road" review forms (Review Forms and fill it out. It's mostly subjective. I usually measure them and photograph them to get some stats, but when it comes to the letter grades for different categories, it's just up to the individual.

 

I've had individuals and small groups get together and send in some reviews before. Just take some photos (one of the exterior of the restaurant, one of the Reuben and one of the dining area/diners if possible) and send in the rating form!

 

Chris

 

Chris,

If you ever make it to West Lafayette, IN, I recommend the Reuben at O'Bryan's Nine Irish Brothers. It is my personal favorite.

 

Michele

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Chris,

If you ever make it to West Lafayette, IN, I recommend the Reuben at O'Bryan's Nine Irish Brothers. It is my personal favorite.

 

Michele

Thanks, Michele! We're in West Lafayette several times a month. I will definitely put this on my to-do list!

 

Chris

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Becky ought to be doubly happy. We have a camping topic now, to go with our RV topic. Cool! I tought this end of the forum would be quiet till the snow thawed, if it ever does. It was fun to see some fresh gabbing about camping.

 

If you read my bio or click on the link at the bottom of my posts, you'll see that I'm from DeKalb, Illinois. I work, civil service, at NIU, my daughter is a senior there, my son a sophomore. It was a very scarey day and a dark one for DeKalb and NIU. To top it all off, my wife is a 9-1-1 dispatcher with the City of DeKalb and was too busy to check on any of us. We were all locked in our buildings till the all clear. My family was safe, the kids are back in school. I'm afraid that DeKalb and NIU will now always be mentioned with Virginia Tech and Kent State. I think we would rather have been known for being on the Lincoln Highway and having a football team that can never quite beat the Big 10.

 

I hope you get lots of posts on the camping topic. My son and I camped in Wisconsin with the Boy Scouts in his 7th and 8th grade years. It was great fun! But, to me, that is the fun and magic of camping..."with the kids". Once the kids are gone or grown up, you lose your labor force. At ten years old gathering wood for the camp fire is fun. At seventeen it is more like, "are you kidding, why don't we buy some?" Space seems to be a major concern as kids grow older too. Even with individual sleeping bags, "his feet are touching mine!", "no they're not", is a refrain that I don't ever want to hear again at 2:00am. Individual bunks in an RV is far more peaceful.

 

I was inspired to add this post because today my son and I took the cover off the RV, after shoveling 5" of snow and ice off the roof first. I'm thinking road trips, even if the weather is not co-operating. This coming Saturday, the 8th, we are heading South till we run out of snow, probably central Arkansas. We just couldn't take the snow anymore. We're outta' here!

I'll let you guys know where we found Spring.

 

 

Jack Burke

DeKalb, Illinois

 

"On the Lincoln Highway"

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I'll let you guys know where we found Spring.

 

Jack,

 

This morning when I got up it was 57 degrees here in central Indiana but I would guess that by the time you rolled through that would change. We are supposed to have a low of 29 tonight and snow tomorrow. No spring weather yet. Gotta love the midwest weather.

 

Michele

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just a quick thank you for all the birthday wishes. The friendships within "The American Road" are really amazing.

 

Made a two week loop around the Dakotas this Summer. Unfotunately we weren't able to use as many Blue Highways as I would have liked. Interstates are still the answer for two week vacations, but once we retire I hope to never see another one.

 

We did the tourist things in South Dakota: Corn Palace, Badlands, and Mt. Rushmore. I was so glad to get out!! If I saw one more billboard for "Wall Drug" I was going to scream. The South Dakota we saw was one long string of signs. It all got so tacky and irritating. North Dakota was a welcome and wonderful surprise. No billboards, no casinos just real towns with real people and all very nice. We stayed in Medora and visited the Theodore Roosevelt National Park. Did you know that North Dakota has a Badlands? Yep, at TR's National Park and is even better than South Dakota's Badlands. Medora celebrates Teddy Roosevelt at every turn and is a very enjoyable town to walk.

 

We returned to Illinois through Minnesota and Wisconsin and it was back to work at NIU. My daughter graduated in May with her degree in French and my son is currently a Junior. I have a road atlas marked American Road and plot every route that appears in the magazine. As soon as my son is finished, I hope to try all those featured roads and maybe discover some along the way. In the mean time thank you for a wonderful magazine for dreamers and thanks to the forum.

 

Jack Burke

DeKalb, Illinois

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I have a road atlas marked American Road and plot every route that appears in the magazine. As soon as my son is finished, I hope to try all those featured roads and maybe discover some along the way. In the mean time thank you for a wonderful magazine for dreamers and thanks to the forum.

 

Jack Burke

DeKalb, Illinois

 

Right back at ya, Jack! And when it comes time to do the Ben Hur Route (Fall, 2007), I'll cruise it with you! Had a really fun time with Thomas Repp mapping and subsequently following that old auto trail. The start's just a few hours away from you in Terre Haute (or Ft. Wayne, depending on which way you're headed). Since it's been over a year since we did that, I think I just might have to take a weekend before winter hits and drive it again.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello all again. We made three major trips this past year in our Class B conversion van. All three were centered around attending rallies with like minded Class B owners. The first was in the Hocking Hills area of southern Ohio. From there we went on to Washington DC and back to Indianapolis for the Indy 500, a yearly ritual. So as not to repeat myself all over the internet, here is a reference for that trip with heavy emphasis on road food.

 

http://www.roadfood.com/Forums/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=27766

 

The second trip in June was west to Niobrara State Park in northeast Nebraska where we again got together with B owners and then came back to Minnesota via Iowa to further sample award winning pork tenderloin sandwiches. Niobrara SP was a surprisingly beautiful park situated on hills that overlooked the confluence of the Niobrara River and the Missouri River. It was also a Lewis & Clark Expedition stop. Again, another trip report.

 

http://www.roadfood.com/Forums/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=28000

 

The last trip was in late September through early October out west primarily to Moab, Utah for another B rally. We passed through the Badlands, Black Hills, Rocky Mountain NP, Dinosaur, NM to get there. In Moab we spent time at Arches NP, Canyonlands NP and Dead Horse Point SP. We returned via the Grand Canyon South Rim and Taos, NM. Again I posted this B out West trip report in Roadfood.com with an emphasis on their favorite subject - road food. You might enjoy it.

 

http://www.roadfood.com/forums/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=30902

 

What forum would one post trip reports like this in American Road?

 

We are pretty much parked for the winter now. Our next planned trip will be to Louisiana in April unless we get the itch and decide to head south in January. In three seasons of RV travel we have managed to put on 35,000 miles of travel covering 27 states so far. More and more of those miles have been on the blue highways as we learn to slow down and enjoy the country.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
What forum would one post trip reports like this in American Road?

 

 

Not to worry! I have just started to scan your great reports, and given the quality, choose anyplace here you like as far as I'm concerned!

 

I'll check them out more in the AM, but I say don't worry about where, get on with when! :)

 

Great stuff!!!

 

Keep the Show on the Road!

 

Dave

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


×