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Celebrating our two-lane highways of yesteryear…And the joys of driving them today!

Road Warrior

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Road Warrior last won the day on April 6 2013

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About Road Warrior

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    Day Tripper
  • Birthday 04/09/1960

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    http://www.pacific-hwy.net
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    roadwarrior@sunset-hwy.com

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    Male
  • Location
    Seattle
  • Interests
    Riding my motorcycle on the old highways. Exploring old roads and trails.
  1. Excellent post Dave The ice age had carved out many features in our state. Being so close to the freeway makes this a nice little stop. The scenery is spectacular. I have a old photo on the construction of the road. I am pretty sure it was taken in the same spot as your first one. The other is from where you enter the coulee. The third is from mt trip there. Curt
  2. First Road From Fall City, Wa To Snoqualmie, Wa

    After more research this road was actually built in 1865. Because the Cedar River trail was too brutal to the animals and people who traveled on it. This road was abandoned in 1894 when the route was moved to the north of the river to Snoqualmie Falls.
  3. The First Fall City to Snoqualmie Road This is the original route from 1883 built by pioneer Jeremiah Borst that went up to where the train depot would be built before the NP made it there. The road continued on to Snoqualmie Ridge and down into Snoqualmie and the Borst property. This is the most feasible route to Snoqualmie from Fall City if you had to walk. The depot was built there because it was the best place due to the terrain but also it was because (my opinion) it was on the new county road between Snoqualmie and Fall City. There was no need to build a road as it was already there. Before that (1860s) The road was more of a cattle trail (while wagons could use it) from Fall City to the Borst Cabin over the Snoqualmie Ridge. In the 1850s people traveled to Seattle from Yakama pass along the Cedar River. In 1867 the road was changed to North Bend and Fall City over the Snoqualmie River route to the Snoqualmie Pass. The Cedar River route remained a footpath. That section to the cemetery may have been started then. From 1858 to 1865 Yakama Pass was referred as Snoqualmie Pass. Hence the confusion. This all coincides with the incorporation of Fall City. Most of the current streets are from the 1880's. And that little strip of road up to the cemetery was an original section of the Snoqualmie road to the pass that connected to the Toll Road in 1883. The Toll Road started at the Borst Cabin (about River street in Snoqualmie) then to Easton. This is the reason I think it is important. As it is the very first road east out of town when the town was first settled. It stayed that way until sometime into the 1890s I am still researching that part. Here are some of my findings to support my opinion. I saw an advertisement that pioneer Jeremiah Borst was selling tracts of his land in the 80s. I forgot to save that one and can't find it when I looked again. Borst in about 1877 had a vested interest in that section of road at the time. This is the year he have may begun the work. This is a snippet from the Wagon Road Act of 1875. SEC. 7. Whenever the sum of five thousand dollars shall have been realized, said commissioners shall meet as soon as practicable at the house of Jeremiah W. Borst, on Snoqualmie prairie, and after having been duly qualified as provided in section six, shall proceed to view and locate a road between the two points named in the first section of this act, by the nearest practicable route. Said trustee shall also receive said ten per cent. of said net proceeds, and without delay pay the same to E. P. Boyles, George Taylor and S. R. Geddis of Yakima county, and Jeremiah W. Borst and Rufus Stearns of King county, who are hereby constituted a board of commissioners to superintend the expenditure of all moneys realized for the benefit of said road, under the provisions of this act. He was to receive 10% of the proceeds for his work on the road. Even though the lotteries were cancelled I saw an article from 1878 that said $180 was spent on the road from the lottery proceeds. He must have built it regardless, due to the fact he would become rich selling his land as the price would increase if there was a highway from Seattle that came through his property. There already was a cattle trail so it just needed improvements. That is why the maps shows a trail between Fall City and Snoqualmie in the 1873. In 1873 the map shows the road finished just past where the depot was. This is why I believe that the strip is historically significant to Fall City and Snoqualmie. This was the very first wagon road to link the two towns. The maps show the abandoned road and the picture is from an intact part of it that leads up to the cemetery in Fall City. ( about 300 feet) My Snoqualmie Road page is up but i need to rewrite the history part. www.sunset-hwy.com/wagon.htm Happy trails Curt
  4. Here are my latest then and now photos. They both were taken on the west side of Snoqualmie Pass. The road opened last week. There wasn't many downed trees. The water though was full of gravel but the water was flowing though it. The brush around the though had been cleared by someone so it is easy to spot. Curt
  5. This is a report on the 4 mile stretch of the Yellowstone trail that has been abandoned since 1927. It lies northwest of Lake Easton, WA. I also took some photos of the 1927 bridge on the new alignment that replaced the ghost highway. Most of this road is so overgrown that in places it is just a footpath. We were able to walk or drive on all but the last mile which has not seen a car in almost 90 years. here is the link to the page. http://www.sunset-hwy.com/ghost.htm Happy Trails Curt The B/W photo is looking eastbound with Little Kachess Lake in the Distance taken 4-29-2016 using photo editor The then and now photo is looking westbound. I am 90% certain this close to the same spot.
  6. What Nameplate(S) Do You Want To Own Yet!?

    I can't remember the last time I saw a Chevette must less one painted as the General Lee. LOL
  7. Music-Radio, Projects, 1 Of My Displays

    Hi Cort I enjoyed reading your poems. Very well done. I wish you well and thanks for sharing your memories. Curt
  8. My wife Leona and I took a trip from Ellensburg, WA to Spokane, WA. on the Southern route. I put together some scenic photos of the trail. Here is the link http://www.sunset-hw...m/portraits.htm Happy Trails Curt
  9. Cremated Remains Found in Yellowstone Trail bridge There used to be a myth in the little town of Fall City which is just a few miles downstream from the beautiful Snoqualmie Falls. For over 60 years there was a rumor that there were two urns placed inside the old concrete bridge during construction in 1916. When the old bridge was being torn down in 1980, the two urns were discovered by a construction worker. This proved that the myth was in fact a true story. The Fall City Historical Society has published an excellent article on the bridges of Fall City. The 1980 story about the discovery of the two urns and how they came to be inside of the concrete bridge are on the last page. Click the below link to read the article. http://www.ilwu19.com/sunsethwy/images/kirkland_route/Bridges_of_Fall_City.pdf Link to Fall City Historical Society. http://www.fallcityhistorical.org/index.html
  10. Mystery of the missing switchback solved! The old photo below shows the hairpin curve on the west side of Snoqualmie Pass. I believe it was taken about 1915 when the Sunset Highway/Yellowstone Trail was opened for traffic. In the summer of 2013 my wife Leona and I met up with Dave (King of the Road) and his wife Sheila for a trip up the pass to look for the water trough. While we were there I noticed that the upper switchback near where the trough is didn't quite match the alignment that was in the photo below. I was telling Dave that maybe it was just realigned some time in the past. This has always bothered me and I had to know what happened. While I was sitting by the computer last week. I was doing some research and looking at some old county maps. I noticed on one of them showing 3 switchbacks on the west side of the pass. I thought this missing switchback had to be the one that the old photo was showing. I have some 1915 county survey maps of the pass and they only showed 2 switchbacks. I then realized that one section was missing. So going back to the county website I was able to find a map of the pass from 1926. The highway was realigned in 1926 using the old Milwaukee Road right of way that was abandoned after the tunnel was built. This new alignment bypassed all the switchbacks. As you can see from that survey map below that the old road connects to the new alignment at this 3rd switchback. Looking at a 1958 aerial I was able to confirm that indeed this switchback existed. In the 1930's when the old road was completely bypassed they realigned this section of the old road so it would still be passable. This realignment straightened out this switchback. Following up with a look at the Google Satellite map of the pass I was able to spot the remains of the outer curve. Leona and I drove up there today but there was too much snow to reach the spot. looks like I will have to wait for spring. Now I know just where that old photo was taken. Mystery solved!
  11. Building The Illinois National Road

    Nice to see the brick road is still there. Nice pictures Curt
  12. Great trip and very detailed website. thanks for sharing with us. Curt
  13. Once again a great story! I have travelled this route for many years on my motorcycle long before I knew anything about the Yellowstone Trail. I always enjoyed this road for the scenery and the curves. Even back then I admired and have been intriged by those tunnels and the old alignment. It is nice to see it documented. Thanks Dave as you certainly keep the show on the road. Curt
  14. U.s. 99 Big Bird

    It is great they are restoring the big bird. This is one of the few roadside attractions left on the old 99 route. This part of the old road is now one way (south) but this was the original alignment back in the teens. Look forward to your next post.
  15. Log Rolling On The Yellowstone Trail Ca 1920

    Excellent photos of the old highway. I always knew that the old highway followed the shoreline of the lake and these postcards prove it. Great sleuthing Dave as always. It is always great to see what you have found. Nice work and keep the show on the road. Curt C.
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