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Dave Reese

New Exhibit At America On Wheels

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I have posted a few photos of just some of the classic American cars on display on my Flickr page. These cars are from the Bulgari collection and all drove to the museum as Mr. Bulgari believes that all his cars should be driven from time to time. I will post more photos after the display is completely installed, but it was so much fun to be basically alone with these cars while polishing the bumpers and other bits of chrome and doing finishing detailing this past week. The display opens Saturday April 11, but the cars can be seen now. They will be at America On Wheels in Allentown PA for about 6 months in the West Gallery. Relive your pre-WWII fantasies. I will be posting photos of the Hudson on display for Alex soon, but here is the write up of that particular car:

1936 Hudson Series 65 Custom 8 Convertible

L-head Inline straight eight cylinder engine, three speed manual transmission, 120 inch wheelbase

This car is a fine example of a super Art Deco design with center mounted dash cluster, disappearing wing window assemblies, electric shifter on column, and very low windshield line. The standard equipment found only on the Custom Eight series includes the large wheel covers, a banjo style steering wheel, a radio with under-the-running-board antenna, and a cigar lighter. This Convertible Coupe also sports various optional equipment including fender mounted parking lights, an electric clock and the “Electric Hand” vacuum-electric transmission control system. This is one of only six known survivors.

Who is coming so I can give them a personal tour?

Edited by Dave Reese

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Who is coming so I can give them a personal tour?

I certainly want to but it's not overly likely just now. Last year I had two "company sponsored" trips somewhat nearby but neither worked out for the museum. The major portion of this year's vacation is presently allotted to west bound travel but, if the company sends me anywhere close, I'll be there.

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Denny,

If you do think you may make it, let me know. I will post more photos when the displays are done and will you all know when they are up on Flickr...

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I'll take the 36 Hudson convert - no surpise there. I think that was restored by Park Waldrop - last I heard, if that's the same car, it sold at auction for something like $90,000.

 

Hudson's are appreciating in value - at a recent Amelia Island auction a 1954 Hudson Italia sold for $275,000 - I missed it by, oh, $274,500. :D

 

Hudsonly,

Alex Burr

Memphis, TN

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Our latest show has been running since November, but it was only finally completed last week as we had model railroad displays in the changing gallery along with the cars through the new year. We finally added the final installation of our Concept and Custom car show, and we have an interesting mix, including one for Alex to drool over...the Hudson Italia. Photos are posted on the America On Wheels page on Facebook, or at my Flickr page at http://www.flickr.com/photos/brooklands/se...57623055295101/ . I am still awaiting my first visitor from this forum to come for a personal tour.

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Our latest show has been running since November, but it was only finally completed last week as we had model railroad displays in the changing gallery along with the cars through the new year. We finally added the final installation of our Concept and Custom car show, and we have an interesting mix, including one for Alex to drool over...the Hudson Italia. Photos are posted on the America On Wheels page on Facebook, or at my Flickr page at http://www.flickr.com/photos/brooklands/se...57623055295101/ . I am still awaiting my first visitor from this forum to come for a personal tour.

 

Thanks for the heads up and link, Dave. Surprisingly, came down to brass tacks I'd just as soon have the Pontiac station wagon. I had a Star Chief, two-door hard-top of that era at one time. That thing would go like the hammers of hell. Solid, dependable - the '55 thru '57 Pony's would be on my "like to have" list, right along with a few dozen Hudsons.

 

The Italia is a good little car - to little to late is all. I've heard at least one person refer to it as Hudsons Edsel. Would be fun to run around in, but not hi on my want list of things I'll probably never get my hands on.

 

Hudsonly,

Alex Burr

Memphis, TN

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Our latest show has been running since November, but it was only finally completed last week as we had model railroad displays in the changing gallery along with the cars through the new year. We finally added the final installation of our Concept and Custom car show, and we have an interesting mix, including one for Alex to drool over...the Hudson Italia. Photos are posted on the America On Wheels page on Facebook, or at my Flickr page at http://www.flickr.com/photos/brooklands/se...57623055295101/ . I am still awaiting my first visitor from this forum to come for a personal tour.

 

Dave,

 

Those cars are beautiful (except the violet one found in a barn) and recall a day when we all customized our cars. I know it is still done, but in my day no young fellow drove a car that wasn’t at least a little customized.

 

I recall the driver’s ed teacher saying he thought it reduced accidents! His take was we wouldn’t risk wrecking our babies. I’m glad he didn’t spot me dragging 1st Street in San Jose every Friday night. I even started a minor fad.......I put lights in the wheel wells above the spinners….!!

 

Your photographs are as impressive as the cars. And believe me, if I had travel plans anywhere near, I’d stop in to take a look.

 

Dave

 

Keep the Show on the Road.

 

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A very nice set of cars -- and pictures. Maybe this will be the year I make it to AOW. The one time I got close, you headed to Alaska. I bet that doesn't happen again.

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The one time I got close, you headed to Alaska. I bet that doesn't happen again.

 

 

Just don't come when we are driving to Charleston, Savannah, and Saint Augustine this spring, or when we are in Japan (not a road trip)...

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Dave,

 

. I even started a minor fad.......I put lights in the wheel wells above the spinners….!!

 

 

Dave

 

Keep the Show on the Road.

 

When I was stationed at the NAAS in Kingsville, TX, back in 1958, 1959, there was a fellow from California that had a beautiful 1946 or 1947 Lincoln coupe rigged up with spinners and lights in the wheel wells. Was a beautiful sight to see at night.

 

Hudsonly,

Alex Burr

Memphis, TN

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When I was stationed at the NAAS in Kingsville, TX, back in 1958, 1959, there was a fellow from California that had a beautiful 1946 or 1947 Lincoln coupe rigged up with spinners and lights in the wheel wells. Was a beautiful sight to see at night.

 

Hudsonly,

Alex Burr

Memphis, TN

 

Alex,

 

See, I told you I started a fad!! But then who was first? I was “cruisin’ the main” in 56 and 57, but who knows?

 

The San Jose cops were curious, but ended up not hassling me as they concluded that side lights were a benefit for safety, so long as the bulbs were not directly visible.

 

I went so far as to try colored lights. Red or blue (the car was iridescent blue) really were sharp. They really did look great with spinners, and in fact might look good with today's chrome rims!!

 

Dave

 

Keep the Show on the Road

 

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Dave,

 

Those cars are beautiful (except the violet one found in a barn) and recall a day when we all customized our cars. I know it is still done, but in my day no young fellow drove a car that wasn’t at least a little customized.

 

 

Yep, here's my story and apologies to all if I'm repeating myself. (We old guys have a tendency to do that you know.)

 

My custom was a '52 Ford Victoria (2D hardtop) that I bought for $350 in 1957. It had already been "done" by one of the locals but the lead was cracking so after a few months of that bugging me I replaced the lead with body plastic, a superior filler. The Vicky was nosed, decked w/solonoid, frenched headlights and tailights (Olds), sans door handles w/solonoids, '53 Chevy grill, overdrive tranny, original flathead w/2 Ford 94 carbs (far superior to the popular Stromberg 97's), duel glasspaks, flamed dash, Olds fiesta spinners, and repainted w/1958 Chevy truck white enamel. Ford didn't offer a pure white color at the time and my one-of-a-kind looked spectacular. I had help with some of the work from Dad, of course, who, for example, crafted two minimum-bent copper fuel lines with large diameter from the pump to the carbs that just dumped gas into them. With gas at about twenty-five cents, who cared about mileage? I painted all dash and interior bulbs blue as well as the parking lights up front. The latter wasn't acceptable to the local cops so that didn't last long. The Ford ran extremely well for being a flathead and would easily bury the speedo.

 

My Good Girl (still with me 50 years later) loved the old Ford and we wish we still had it....Bliss

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Bliss,

 

If you are repeating yourself, that description bears repeating! That custom job was the real thing!

 

Did you sport a cast brass plate in the rear window with a club name? That was common on the west coast.

 

We need a photo!

 

Dave

 

Keep the Show on the Road!

 

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Bliss,

 

If you are repeating yourself, that description bears repeating! That custom job was the real thing!

 

Did you sport a cast brass plate in the rear window with a club name? That was common on the west coast.

 

We need a photo!

 

 

 

In the midwest the club plaque was hung by chain links from under the rear bumper just below the license plate. I had one for awhile but there was really little interest in maintaining a car club so I removed it. Besides, with a 2 inch lowering block kit installed the plaque dragged the pavement at the start of each back street drag race.

 

I rear ended a stopped car on my way to school one morning and the Ford's front end sheet metal was a crumpled disaster. The car was so tough, though, that not even the radiator, fan, or anything else was damaged under the hood. Dad and I, along with a friend's help, installed a complete front end from a salvaged '53 Ford Crestliner. It was a fairly easy bolt-on job and I was up and running within a few weeks. The Chevy grill and frenched headlights were gone, however. The '53 stock grill had the ugly "ball" in the center but J.C. Whitney from Chicago had a cheap straight bar replacement that looked custom and cool so on it went. Never bothered to refrench the headlights, as that was more of a west coast look. Block sanded the entire car, renosed the hood, relocated the door switches, and had the car repainted '58 Chevy truck white. A few days after the new paint job a young gal decided to decorate the entire car with red lipstick; ie, her name, hearts, etc. ("Girls do this to Elvis' car all the time" she said while wondering why I was so upset.) Brother, what a nightmare! I finally got the lipstick removed with paint thinner but I was never really happy with the white color after that and a year later had the car repainted with black Chevy enamel. Once again, it looked spectacular but I always wished that I had selected a dark blue color to match the interior instead.

 

I began cruisin' with my Good Girl that same summer and she loved the black color and still does. Our '04 Monte Carlo is a testament to that.

 

Have an old Kodac photo or two somewhere but even if I could find them I have no clue about posting them to this forum....Bliss

 

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I never did any customizing, because that took talent I did not have. I could do it with plastic in 1/24 scale, but not with sheet metal. The most I did was changing paint on my 1952 Buick Special 4-door which I had painted competition yellow with the raised section of the hood in flat black. It did stand out among the British Sports cars on campus in college...

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Yep, here's my story and apologies to all if I'm repeating myself. (We old guys have a tendency to do that you know.)

 

My custom was a '52 Ford Victoria (2D hardtop) that I bought for $350 in 1957. It had already been "done" by one of the locals but the lead was cracking so after a few months of that bugging me I replaced the lead with body plastic, a superior filler. The Vicky was nosed, decked w/solonoid, frenched headlights and tailights (Olds), sans door handles w/solonoids, '53 Chevy grill, overdrive tranny, original flathead w/2 Ford 94 carbs (far superior to the popular Stromberg 97's), duel glasspaks, flamed dash, Olds fiesta spinners, and repainted w/1958 Chevy truck white enamel. Ford didn't offer a pure white color at the time and my one-of-a-kind looked spectacular. I had help with some of the work from Dad, of course, who, for example, crafted two minimum-bent copper fuel lines with large diameter from the pump to the carbs that just dumped gas into them. With gas at about twenty-five cents, who cared about mileage? I painted all dash and interior bulbs blue as well as the parking lights up front. The latter wasn't acceptable to the local cops so that didn't last long. The Ford ran extremely well for being a flathead and would easily bury the speedo.

 

My Good Girl (still with me 50 years later) loved the old Ford and we wish we still had it....Bliss

I also had a '52 Ford but it was the cheapy 2 door sedan. I owned it in 1964. A flathead V8 with dual exhausts, dual carbs on an Offenhauser manifold, and a dual point Mallory ignition. Three speed with overdrive. Most of the work was done by a friend who worked in a service station and I bought it from him when he moved on to something else though I forget what it was.

 

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I also had a '52 Ford but it was the cheapy 2 door sedan. I owned it in 1964. A flathead V8 with dual exhausts, dual carbs on an Offenhauser manifold, and a dual point Mallory ignition. Three speed with overdrive. Most of the work was done by a friend who worked in a service station and I bought it from him when he moved on to something else though I forget what it was.

 

 

 

I moved on to a '55 Chevy Bel Air (2D hardtop) with 265 ci V8 and 2 speed Powerglide. Beautiful turquoise and white low-mileage car that had actually been owned by an "old maid" and bought new from Dad. Terrible motor that should have been "overhauled" but wasn't for a varlety of reasons and prone to body rust. All in all, a huge disappointment....Bliss

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