Jump to content
American Road Magazine
Celebrating our two-lane highways of yesteryear…And the joys of driving them today!

Recommended Posts

I'm sure many here are familiar with David Wickline's "Images of 66" book. I received the second volume a week or so back but have just now finished turning all the pages. Unlike some other publications I've heard of, you don't have to claim you buy "Images..." "to read the articles". That's not to belittle the text that accompanies Dave's photos - it's all quite good and informative - but to acknowledge that the images (ergo, I'm guessing, the name;-) are the reason someone buys this book. The sub-title is "Digging Deeper" and that certainly fits. Volume 1 is an absolute Route 66 essential and Volume 2 is only slightly less of one. I remember thinking of Volume 1 as a "spotter's guide". Many of its images are of things that even somewhat casual Route fans have heard of but not seen. Volume 2 is also a "spotter's guide" but it contains a higher percentage of things that I haven't heard of but now have a real desire to go spot. Along with a couple thousand individual pictures, there are several "collections" in Volume 2. I believe that La Bajada was about the only subject that filled multiple pages of Volume 1. As others have mentioned, Volume 2 has the well done section on Ron Jones and his tattoos (BTW, Ron moves pretty fast and I think Dave's already a tat or two behind.) and a great section on the sites of the '03 Hampton Caravan. But, It also has three pages of Valentine diners, the murals of Cuba, a whole bunch of big stuff (e.g., muffler men), and a set of pictures showing - and naming - the eight styles of Sears homes in Carlinville's Standard Addition and there's probably some I'm forgetting. One of the things I didn't even know of before but hope to check out on the way to or from Litchfield next month, is the collection (OK, pair) of Lustron homes in Pontiac.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I'm sure many here are familiar with David Wickline's "Images of 66" book...............

 

...................a set of pictures showing - and naming - the eight styles of Sears homes in Carlinville's Standard Addition and there's probably some I'm forgetting. One of the things I didn't even know of before but hope to check out on the way to or from Litchfield next month, is the collection (OK, pair) of Lustron homes in Pontiac.

 

Denny,

 

You are a true Renaissance Road Man! And so is David Wickline. I doubt that one in a thousand even knows that Sears sold bolt together houses out of their catalog. I’ll look for his book.

 

I didn’t know that Carlinville (IL) was such a treasure trove, and until I did a little looksee, hadn’t heard of the mystery woman on horseback who directed the building of the Carlinville homes.

 

http://www.oldhouseweb.com/stories/Detailed/10102.shtml

 

I suppose that it just proves again that the two lane roads lead to everything!

 

Keep the Show on the Road!

 

Dave

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Carlinville's the mother lode but Sears houses pop up everywhere. A surprising discovery for me last year was the building that is the visitors center and museum at the Harding home in Marion, Ohio. It's a small Sears home originally built in 1920 to accommodate reporters while Harding campaigned from home.

 

Thanks for the link. That's a book I'd not heard of.

 

Oops. I intended to include this - http://www.roadhouse66.com/ - to help in locating "Images..." and it's available at many businesses along Route 66, too.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Carlinville's the mother lode but Sears houses pop up everywhere.

Oops. I intended to include this - http://www.roadhouse66.com/ - to help in locating "Images..." and it's available at many businesses along Route 66, too.

 

 

I see that Berwyn is getting ready to tear down a Sears House. First the Spindle, now this.

 

Looking forward to getting a copy of David's new book at Litchfield. See you there.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sears houses do show up everywhere - my whole neighborhood, as I've said before, is Sears pre-fab housing, built in the 1960's. So, Denny, you can truly say you've slept in a Sears Pre-fab house.

 

Considering these houses were built 40+ years ago, they've stood up well.

 

Hudsonly,

Alex Burr

Memphis, TN

Edited by Alex Burr - hester_nec

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×