Jump to content
American Road Magazine
Celebrating our two-lane highways of yesteryear…And the joys of driving them today!
Keep the Show on the Road!

Artifacts To Go To Winners On The Hypotenuse Trail

Recommended Posts

Ok, Here is the winners list for the Hypotenuse Trail artifacts.

 

Mobilene and Alex tied on the postings, but Mobilene was wise enough to sign up as a Hypotenuse member before the trip, so he edges out Alex for first place. Denny also joined and posted several times, bringing him to third place. Chris, Cityboy, and Starfire all posted an equal number of times, but Chris signed up as a member before the trip so he comes in at 4th place, and Starfire and Cityboy tie for fifth. Matt, Roadhound, and USRoadman are all tied for sixth, and Chad, Pigdog, and Butko earned honorable mention.

 

The winners in order:

 

Mobilene

Alex

Denny

Chris

Cityboy and Starfire

Matt, Roadhound, USRoadman

Chad, Pigdog, Butko

 

The wonderful artifacts, in no particular order, are as follows:

 

1. An authentic electrical connection found on the pump island of the 1927 Lincoln Highway service station at Sutherland, Nebraska.

2. The official Nebraska Highway Patrol speeding warning issued to the Hypotenuse Trail Blazer as he struggled along his route.

3. An Official Everglades National Park guide distributed at the entrance. Save this item for 30 years and sell it on Ebay to supplement your retirement.

4. An Official Ft Laramie guide handed the Trail Blazer inside Park headquarters. Again…keep Ebay in mind.

5. The Official National Park guide for the Vicksburg National Battlefield. You know how hot civil war items are on Ebay, so keep this and turn a buck in your old age.

6. West Palm Beach is the home of the excessively wealthy, also known as the filthy rich. This writing instrument is embossed with West Palm Beach right on the barrel, and has a green removable cap which also serves as a pocket clip. Keep Ebay in mind.

7. A scoop of sand and seashells picked up on the Gulf Coast. If you don’t see a trip to this area in your near future, spread this on a paper towel and wiggle your toes in the white sands of Florida. No value on Ebay.

 

Realizing that some of you already have an extensive collection of similar priceless, and I do mean priceless, treasures, you have until May 5 to op in or out of the artifact feast, after which you will forfeit your earned status. Just post here “I’m in for my rightful share of the Hypotenuse Goodies” or ignore this post and be happy without a collectable. After May 5, I will see who opted in and start offering winners their choice of goodies, starting with the highest ranking among you.

 

You also have until May 5 to protest your standing in the scoring, and the Master Trail Blazer will give it the attention it deserves. :rolleyes:

 

The Hypotenuse Lives on! :) Long Live the Hypotenuse!

 

Keep the Show on the Road!

 

Dave

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just post here “I’m in for my rightful share of the Hypotenuse Goodies”

“I’m in for my rightful share of the Hypotenuse Goodies”

But really the best gift of all will be when you can post more detail, photos and videos of your trip for the whole world to enjoy!

 

Chris

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

“I’m in for my rightful share of the Hypotenuse Goodies”

 

I'm glad you (1) had a safe trip and (2) I'll bet you're glad it's over - but think of the memory's. You have joined the "trail blazers" - the ones that pioneered cross-country auto traveling from 1903 on, Dr. Horatio Jackson, Mrs. Alice Ramsey and even Emily Post. Heady company, isn't it. Or you can go back to the walking or wagon days - and you've joined the likes of Daniel Boone, Kit Carson and the mountain men who opened up all sorts of territories for us to explore. And, oh yes, we shouldn't forget the King Traveler of the "blue" highways - William Least-Heat Moon. Maybe YOU should write a book LOL. But you certainly had it easier than those folks.

 

You learned something about this country of ours - and that's something most people don't have a clue about. Thanks for the sharing with your posts.

 

Hudsonly,

Alex Burr

Memphis, TN

Edited by Alex Burr - hester_nec

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
“I’m in for my rightful share of the Hypotenuse Goodies”

 

I'm glad you (1) had a safe trip and (2) I'll bet you're glad it's over - but think of the memory's. You have joined the "trail blazers" - the ones that pioneered cross-country auto traveling from 1903 on, Dr. Horatio Jackson, Mrs. Alice Ramsey and even Emily Post. Heady company, isn't it. Or you can go back to the walking or wagon days - and you've joined the likes of Daniel Boone, Kit Carson and the mountain men who opened up all sorts of territories for us to explore. And, oh yes, we shouldn't forget the King Traveler of the "blue" highways - William Least-Heat Moon. Maybe YOU should write a book LOL. But you certainly had it easier than those folks.

 

You learned something about this country of ours - and that's something most people don't have a clue about. Thanks for the sharing with your posts.

 

Hudsonly,

Alex Burr

Memphis, TN

 

Alex,

 

Your insights are right on target! I did learn something about this country, and it was good.

 

As I drove along I witnessed Americans doing what we do, mowing lawns, going to school, talking with friends and neighbors, working, playing….all across the country. There were no muggings, no corrupt or corrupted politicians, no death and destruction. Not one example, up close, on the ground.

 

The America on the television is not the America on the ground. Of course it doesn’t take a genius to intellectually recognize that. But when you see the good people of Alabama and Kansas and Wyoming and everywhere else first hand, doing what good people do, it has to viscerally impact you. It did me.

 

The Americas I saw were a strong, happy, hopeful, helpful, hard working lot from the tip of Florida to the Puget Sound. I saw political differences, but they were on the radio or on the signboards, not in the way people interacted, not in how they mowed their lawns, or in whether they smiled or not.

 

I felt proud of America, and Americans…not necessarily proud of what our government does…. but proud of what Americans do, and are doing day by day. We are a good people, from sea to shining sea, and we have the strength and ability to be even better.

 

I intend to post many more photos, and even hope to use a program that will allow them to be viewed on a background map, so the location is evident. However I am handicapped by a leaking kitchen faucet and lawn that is 4 inches tall.

 

Maybe I will start today to post the movie clips as they will not show up on a map as the stills are supposed to, and thus do not take the technical manipulations

 

Thanks again for the thoughts, kind words, and encouragement!

 

Keep the Show on the Road!

 

Dave

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
“I’m in for my rightful share of the Hypotenuse Goodies”

But really the best gift of all will be when you can post more detail, photos and videos of your trip for the whole world to enjoy!

 

Chris

 

Chris,

 

Be careful you don't get what you ask for!!! :) I took at least 300 photos and movies a day! I hope to geotag them in batches, then post the interesting shots on a map of the Hypotenuse, so it will be a useful reference.

 

I may start posting a few videos today. They are 90% thru the windshield shots, but do give a fair feel for what the countryside really looks like where they were taken. They may be more “honest” than a carefully framed still.

 

Keep the Show on the Road!

 

Dave

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Alex,

 

Your insights are right on target! I did learn something about this country, and it was good.

 

As I drove along I witnessed Americans doing what we do, mowing lawns, going to school, talking with friends and neighbors, working, playing….all across the country. There were no muggings, no corrupt or corrupted politicians, no death and destruction. Not one example, up close, on the ground.

 

The America on the television is not the America on the ground. Of course it doesn’t take a genius to intellectually recognize that. But when you see the good people of Alabama and Kansas and Wyoming and everywhere else first hand, doing what good people do, it has to viscerally impact you. It did me.

 

The Americas I saw were a strong, happy, hopeful, helpful, hard working lot from the tip of Florida to the Puget Sound. I saw political differences, but they were on the radio or on the signboards, not in the way people interacted, not in how they mowed their lawns, or in whether they smiled or not.

 

I felt proud of America, and Americans…not necessarily proud of what our government does…. but proud of what Americans do, and are doing day by day. We are a good people, from sea to shining sea, and we have the strength and ability to be even better.

 

I intend to post many more photos, and even hope to use a program that will allow them to be viewed on a background map, so the location is evident. However I am handicapped by a leaking kitchen faucet and lawn that is 4 inches tall.

 

Maybe I will start today to post the movie clips as they will not show up on a map as the stills are supposed to, and thus do not take the technical manipulations

 

Thanks again for the thoughts, kind words, and encouragement!

 

Keep the Show on the Road!

 

Dave

 

 

What you seem to have discovered that once one gets away from the major metropolitan areas America is still alive and well and some of the photos you have already posted proves it. But, don't let that lull you or anyone into thinking things are as they were fifty years ago even in rural America.

 

We live over 80 miles from any major population center in a county almost as large as Rhode Island, but with only 25 or so thousand people, and we still have drug problems which of course creates petty theft and burglary problems. While our problems are small compared to a New York, Los Angeles, Chicago, Miami, Houston, or Dallas, rural America is no longer fully insulated from some of the same problems as it once was.

 

Jim

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
What you seem to have discovered that once one gets away from the major metropolitan areas America is still alive and well and some of the photos you have already posted proves it. But, don't let that lull you or anyone into thinking things are as they were fifty years ago even in rural America.

 

We live over 80 miles from any major population center in a county almost as large as Rhode Island, but with only 25 or so thousand people, and we still have drug problems which of course creates petty theft and burglary problems. While our problems are small compared to a New York, Los Angeles, Chicago, Miami, Houston, or Dallas, rural America is no longer fully insulated from some of the same problems as it once was.

 

Jim

 

Jim,

 

I know there are problems. And I know things aren't what they were 50 years ago. You are absolutely right.

 

But I think if you travel and only see the sights, you miss half the trip. I don’t want to prompt a political discussion, and I hope I am politically neutral in what I write. But the overwhelming impression I gained along the American road is that our media, particularly radio and TV is consumed with crime and politics, while Americans are busy elsewhere.

 

For example, I would be the first to acknowledge that the wisdom or ignorance of our political leadership makes a difference, but not to the enormous extent you would think if you follow the media. No where along my route did a single person ask or assert anything remotely related to politics. But when I turned on the radio, or the TV, I was buried in political opinions, political propaganda, and a little news.

 

Listening to the TV and radio for months before I took this trip, I half expected I would feel the crime and political turmoil I was seeing every moment on those media. I didn’t. Instead I felt people all over this land working together, laughing, playing, walking, and living without the rancor and bitterness that pervades the media.

 

That was a revelation, and a most happy one. I went looking for the American I feared we had lost, and found instead that we had lost nothing, and we were still the optimistic, forward looking people that made and make this country great.

 

My own sister (who never travels, and watches TV) cautioned me that I would not be welcome in some places, and that I was risking getting mugged along the way. Nothing of the sort, and no indication in the slightest that either was a risk.

 

I guess I would encourage everyone to turn off the TV and radio (at least for awhile), and hit the road, particularly the two lanes. Look for yourself. Don’t take my word for it. We are there, we are well, and we can be whatever we put our mind to. We can be better, of course, and we only need to continue doing that.

 

Keep the Show on the Road!

 

Dave

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

“I’m in for my rightful share of the Hypotenuse Goodies”

 

I don't know if rightful is the correct word, but I'm all for trinkets! :lol:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
That was a revelation, and a most happy one. I went looking for the American I feared we had lost, and found instead that we had lost nothing, and we were still the optimistic, forward looking people that made and make this country great.

 

My own sister (who never travels, and watches TV) cautioned me that I would not be welcome in some places, and that I was risking getting mugged along the way. Nothing of the sort, and no indication in the slightest that either was a risk.

 

I guess I would encourage everyone to turn off the TV and radio (at least for awhile), and hit the road, particularly the two lanes. Look for yourself. Don’t take my word for it. We are there, we are well, and we can be whatever we put our mind to. We can be better, of course, and we only need to continue doing that.

 

Keep the Show on the Road!

 

Dave

 

Yup, people in rural America are still genuine and usually most eager to strike up a conversation with a passing stranger. And as you know, it is very, very unlikely anyone would get mugged. Unlike "City" people most who live in rural America are not glued to their TV. We don't have the time for one thing, though we might have access to 500 channels via Satellite. For another we still have meaningful conversations with the folks sitting at the table next to us in the local diners. The conversations will be about the weather, the last sale at the auction barn, how the fishing was last weekend, a mountain lion being seen roaming the area, and sometimes about how the rest of the world is going to hell.

 

Out here in the boonies we can still leave home without locking the doors and walk around outside at mid-night without fear of somebody jumping us in the dark. On the other hand, if you are lurking around in the dark at mid-night on someone's property uninvited you might just go home in a body bag, if the dogs don't run you off first. Believe it or not, from time to time we still have problems with cattle rustling and horse theft right here in the 21st Century.

 

So if your not a cattle rustler or horse thief, Y'all come see us, you'll be glad you did! :D

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Even though that warning ticket would certainly look good in a frame on my wall, I've decided to step aside and let some of the younger guys (who can actually consider saving something for 30 years) move up a row at the awards ceremony.

 

By the way, was your sister seriously disappointed that you didn't get mugged along the way?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Even though that warning ticket would certainly look good in a frame on my wall, I've decided to step aside and let some of the younger guys (who can actually consider saving something for 30 years) move up a row at the awards ceremony.

 

By the way, was your sister seriously disappointed that you didn't get mugged along the way?

 

Denny,

 

Yah, me too. If I did hang on to these “treasures” for thirty years, I would have no idea by then what they were!

 

Sis is a unique individual. She would have jumped for joy that her older brother was wrong and she was right, but had tears in her eyes at my misfortune!

 

Keep the Show on the Road!

 

Dave

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×