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Celebrating our two-lane highways of yesteryear…And the joys of driving them today!
Jennifer

Welcome - Please Introduce Yourself!

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Greetings! My name is Bob Orlandini. I live in Terre Haute, Indiana, the original "Crossroads of America." I guess my love of traveling by car began because of the lack of trips when I was a kid. The only "family" vacation we took when I was a kid was when I was 5. We went to Branson, Missouri, before Branson was Branson. My dad spent the week fishing, except for one day when we went to Silver Dollar City. (I took my 9-year-old son to Silver Dollar City last summer ... boy, how things have changed!) Anyway, from that 1968 vacation, fast-forward to May 1981 ... the day after I graduated high school, three buddies and I took off for St. Louis for several days, going to a Cardinals game, Six Flags, the Arch, Laclede's Landing. Later that same year a co-worker invited me to go to Atlanta for the Peach Bowl football game on New Year's Eve. I realized from those two trips just how much I enjoyed jumping in the car and going off to explore new places. Since then, I've managed to visit 36 states and have been able to find the time to get off the interstate and explore some back roads in most of them.

 

Earlier this year, my girlfriend Susan and I decided to start documenting some of our excursions. And so Redhighways.com was born. However, both of her daughters decided to have babies this year, so most of our travels this summer have been to Effingham, Ill., and Indianapolis to see the grandkids.

 

OK, I've already spent a couple of hours reading the posts just in this thread (thanks to the side trip to jimgrey.net ... great stuff Jim!). It's time to go explore the rest of the forums.

 

 

Let me add my welcome Bob - and to congratulate you on your great web site. Another site I'll have to make time to wander thru.

This is a great group of people, as you may already have realized. Everybody seems to have something interesting to offer - and there's a lot of great web sites too.

I, myself, and fairly new to the website idea - Denny Gibson got my interest started in that angle with his great road trip reports.

So drop in from time to time - and watch for announcements for chat nights on the forum chat page. The last one was a hoot.

Safe Traveling.

 

Hudsonly,

Alex Burr

Memphis, TN

http://www.freewebs.com/yankeetraveller/index.htm

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Kevin,

 

First, welcome...again!

 

We will keep an eye out for your license plate when we are on the road. Did you say you were buying!? :D

 

I grew up in Southern California (La Canada) and lived at different times as an adult in Pomona and Fallbrook. I worked for four years in Mission Viejo in the 1980’s.

 

One set of great grandparents owned a large chunk of what is now San Fernando, and another homesteaded near what is now Frasier Park. Dad worked for the Pacific Electric and later managed the Glendale City Lines (back when busses were private ventures). Mom grew up on the Leslie Brand estate in Burbank.

 

It would be trite to observe that things have changed since the 1940’s and 50’s (but I just did).

 

It is great to get an active poster from Southern California! Even though there has been horrific development, I have been amazed when I visit that I can still find the old roads! As you know, some of those not far outside the most developed areas are still dirt!

 

Re your other posts....Heading up to Reno I suppose you took 395. One of my all time favorite drives, especially on the older alignment. Or did you go up 99? Or? Are you going to share at least a brief report?

 

Welcome aboard!

 

Keep the Show on the Road

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Kevin,

 

First, welcome...again!

 

Re your other posts....Heading up to Reno I suppose you took 395. One of my all time favorite drives, especially on the older alignment. Or did you go up 99? Or? Are you going to share at least a brief report?

 

Welcome aboard!

 

Keep the Show on the Road

 

Thanks for the welcome, again! Yes, I'd be glad to share the travel info & pix of the trip to Reno. Actually, I did travel to Reno via 99, 89 & 88 & returned via 395.

 

So, where would be the best place to post this report? BTW, I did take some pix of the interior of the Peppermill casino that has some really wild lighting. Would that be a point of interest to report on, too?

 

Kevin

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Thanks for the welcome, again! Yes, I'd be glad to share the travel info & pix of the trip to Reno. Actually, I did travel to Reno via 99, 89 & 88 & returned via 395.

 

So, where would be the best place to post this report? BTW, I did take some pix of the interior of the Peppermill casino that has some really wild lighting. Would that be a point of interest to report on, too?

 

Kevin

 

Kevin,

 

The man knows his stuff!! 89 and 88 take you over Carson Pass, then Luther Pass. Great tripping! It has been years......Aren’t the big wheels at Jackson?

 

Write it up!! Post it anywhere you like. I’d suggest US Highways and Auto Trails or State Highways and Other Roads, but choose anyplace you like. Just tell the story! The chief moderators can change the location if necessary...but they seldom do.

 

And as to the lights at the Peppermill, bring them on. If it was part of the experience, share it.

 

Because I know from experience that trying to tell and post the trip all in one big gulp can be daunting, try separate smaller posts. You’ll get more dialog, questions, etc. and you can tailor subsequent posts to the discussion. Just a suggestion.

 

If you are not a computer jocky, photos can be a bit tricky. The Gallery is OK and fairly easy to use. If you want advice on photos, send any of the moderators or me a personal message or e-mail. Jennifer put up some advice under Forum Technical Help. I’d read that first.

 

Looking forward to the reports!

 

Keep the show on the road!

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Hi, I'm Kevin. I've had an interest in roads since I was a kid in the 50s riding with my parents from upstate NY to my grandfather's farm in Maryland.

 

Hi Kevin,

 

Welcome aboard - I look forward to hearing some of your road stories! :welcome:

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Hi, Les here. My wife and I own a 1918 Dodge Brothers touring car and thus an interest in the roads these cars used to travel on. We live in Cambridge, Ohio where we get to see remnants of the old National Road and specifically a couple of the restored S-Bridges.

 

I saw the posting about the trip from Indianapolis to NYC in 1921 in a 1918 Dodge Brothers, so I will add a reply there soon.

 

Thanks for the forum.

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Hi, Les here. My wife and I own a 1918 Dodge Brothers touring car and thus an interest in the roads these cars used to travel on. We live in Cambridge, Ohio where we get to see remnants of the old National Road and specifically a couple of the restored S-Bridges.

 

I saw the posting about the trip from Indianapolis to NYC in 1921 in a 1918 Dodge Brothers, so I will add a reply there soon.

 

Thanks for the forum.

 

Les,

 

Welcome aboard!

 

1918 must have been a good year for Dodges. I’ll have to check with my 97 years old aunt Katherine, who recalls the family Dodge. She is bright as a tack, and might have a small recollection of your Dodge when it was new. Maybe...maybe not. I do know they had a Dodge in the teens.

 

If I can help with maps, etc. let me know.

 

Keep the Show on the Road!

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Hi, Les here. My wife and I own a 1918 Dodge Brothers touring car and thus an interest in the roads these cars used to travel on. We live in Cambridge, Ohio where we get to see remnants of the old National Road and specifically a couple of the restored S-Bridges.

 

I saw the posting about the trip from Indianapolis to NYC in 1921 in a 1918 Dodge Brothers, so I will add a reply there soon.

 

Thanks for the forum.

 

 

Hello Les,

 

Welcome to the American Road Forum! We're glad to have you on board and look forward to reading your posts.

 

Best,

Becky

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Welcome, Les. I don't know much about 1918 Dodges but I do get to Cambridge (birthplace of William "Hopalong Cassidy" Boyd) now and then. Maybe I'll be lucky enough to catch that Dodge Brothers touring car on the road someday.

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Hello all. Traveling on the road has been one of my life long passions since I grew up in Speedway, IN and autos were the center of the world for me. As a kid growing up in the 50s our vacations were always on the road and that was long before the freeways. Mostly we vacationed on a lake in northern Wisconsin. To get there it took twice as long as today. Our family of 6 in a Chevrolet would start out in the evening in order to arrive by noon the next day. One objective was to get through Chicago after midnight. My most memorable trip was from Indianapolis to a beachside motel in Clearwater, FL in 1955. My dad had a brand new Chevy Bel Air station wagon red with white top. Nine of us made that trip in July. My dad, my mom, aunt and uncle, cousin, two brothers and sister. I rode in the back with my younger brother and sister. No seats, just pillows and blankets. Luggage was piled on top of the wagon. There were no freeways back then. It was all blue highways. I remember when we arrived we stopped at a restaurant and my dad fainted from stress and exhaustion since he did most all the driving. The next year it was back to Wisconsin. :D

 

I think nothing of making 11 hour road trips between Minneapolis and Indianapolis. I do it every year and sometimes multiple times. Our latest move was to buy a Class B camper van motorhome. I mentioned more about this in the RV board. Over the years we had traveled to most states by auto and had tent camped in many of the national parks. We are looking for a little more luxury now. :)

 

My career started at the University of Cincinnati in Architecture. I did a brief stint in the United States Navy stationed in Newport, RI the whole time and I eventually landed in Minnesota. I had a long career with my own architectural firm for a while. I was the architectural technical director for 3 years designing and constructing the Mall of America and for the past 15 years managed new store production and new store prototype development at various times for Target Stores until I retired last June. Now I can be on the road when I want. However, Target allowed me the opportunity to travel all over the country. Now it is on my own nickel. :D

 

My main fun on the road is pursuing the breaded pork tenderloin sandwich and here in the north, the walleye sandwich. I have sampled BPT's in over 80 restaurants with camera in hand in 9 states. The pursuit keeps one on the blue highways, the small town diners and places one would not normally think of going. I'm always looking for a great breakfast. I might add one eschews the chain restaurants and keeps off the freeways whenever possible.

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I am a lifelong Hoosier, born and raised in Indianapolis. I attended Wabash College in Crawfordsville, Indiana. I fell in love with maps before I turned 5 years of age--my Dad let me have a "Graphic Street Guide of Greater Indianapolis (in convenient book form)" when I was four and I remember tracking along our route to church or to Grandma's...

 

Since then I have enjoyed sitting with maps and enjoying hours of hypothetical routing and research. I love planning road trips. I like to plan out as many details as possible in advance, with plenty of wiggle room to see the unexpected.

 

I consider myself an amateur cartographer. I had two of my maps published by Wabash College back in the early 1990s and you can check out on-line: Crawfordsville, Indiana and Wabash College campus map. How I wish I would have had Google maps or even Terraserver back then...

 

In 1994 I drove US-36 all of the way from Indianapolis to Denver--this is still one of my favorite routes. I've taken the stretch from Indianapolis to St. Joseph several times over the years. I've also enjoyed taking US-12 through Montana, South Dakota, and Minnesota. This past summer we took US-19 from Tallahassee to St. Petersburg, US-41 through the Everglades, US-1 from Miami to Key West. This fall we took US 40 from Cumberland, MD to Wheeling, WV.

 

I'm hoping to get some photos from these journeys put into a gallery over the next few months or so.

 

As for me, I am a computer programmer in my mid-thirties with two wonderful sons (8 and 11). So far they haven't shown much of an interest in maps and roads, but I don't want to force them. Another hobby of mine is reviewing Reuben sandwiches wherever I travel (Reuben Realm). I've got over 100 reviews and photos posted at the moment.

 

My dream right now is to drive US-52 all the way from Indianapolis to the North Dakota/Saskatchewan border... maybe Summer 2008. Wherever we decide, I'll be sure to ask all of you for advice on what to see and any great reference material for whatever my destination.

 

Thanks for the warm welcome,

Chris Rowland

Edited by Chris Rowland

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Davydd & Chris,

Welcome to both of you & thanks for joining AR forum! We really love it when new members come onboard and hit the ground running with posts. In case you didn't know, the forum is just an arm of American Road magazine. If interested in subscribing, info can be found by clicking on the big yellow "Ameircan Road" at the top of the page. There are some sample pages you can view there. Also Chris, the magazine is on the shelves at the Borders on US 31 South in Greenwood.

 

There are some interesting "links" happening all around here! Chris, I read on your web site where you graduated up the street at Northwest High School and Davydd is a former Speedway resident. For those of you out there who don't know, Speedway High School and Northwest High School are just about a mile apart from one another. Speedway has its own school system and Northwest is part of the Indianapolis Public Schools. Plus, we've got Chris & mobilene both cruising around in red '03 Matrix'. Then Chris went to Wabash College in Crawfordsville, IN which sits on the shoulders of the Ben Hur Route, which as you magazine readers know, is one of the routes covered in the current issue of AR. This is cool stuff and dare I say some pretty good road karma!

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Hey! How are we getting so central-Indiana heavy here?!

 

Chris, I, too, went to an all-male school, Rose-Hulman in Terre Haute. And I work in software test automation. Except for 18 months in publishing, I've been in software development for 18 years.

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Gees, I don’t know whether to laugh or cry! We add two great new posters with great stories, and interests, and both are from the mid west. You midwesterners must have all been born with a silver car key in your mouths! :lol:

 

Now we are comparing high schools...well Boola Boola...what next....the old fight songs? :rolleyes:

 

I want to repeat my welcome to Chris and Davydd. I am frequently surprised at the commonalities we share, and not just our sandwich preferences! For example I share Chris’s love of maps. I lived a few blocks from the Gousha plant in San Jose as a kid and dug the old maps out of their incinerator. And Davydd and I both enjoy the virtues of Class B RV’s. That of course is only the tip of the iceberg.

 

I want to say to both of you that the active posters here are exceptionally fine people. And when you discover their talents and knowledge, you will be astounded. We like each other. do a little good natured razing now and them, share our road related views and experiences, and help each other where possible. We know it takes time and effort to post and share, so we value what you have already offered the gang, and look forward to more!

 

Keep the Show on the Road! Dave

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Thanks all for the welcome. If it is more Hoosiers you want I may let an old Speedway classmate of mine know about this forum. He just completed a round trip from Indiana to California in October via Route 66 in his 1966 Falcon. He emailed me some very interesting reports.

 

My favorite drive is US 61 from Duluth to the Canadian border along Lake Superior. We made three trips up there this year. In the past we did the whole Lake Superior circle tour putting our kayaks in at selected bays.

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I grew up in the 50s and 60s in Tacoma, Washington, nestled against the 4-lane pavement of the Pacific Coast Highway, US 99. For some reason most of our trips went north toward Seattle, and hence the informal moniker, the Seattle-Tacoma Highway. Of course it ran south and west as well, through Fort Lewis and Olympia where it made a hard left onto Capitol Way (Boulevard) running alongside the Olympia Brewery at Tumwater. Eventually it became a makeshift "freeway" or at least a divided highway to Centralia/Chehalis, Longview/Kelso, and ultimately exited the state at Vancouver where it crossed the long bridge to Portland, Oregon.

 

Maybe its familiarity bred comtempt because I never considered these journeys as more than extended Sunday drives with my parents. It wasn't until 1954 that I caught my first glimpse of what would become my favorite highway, US 10. US 99 connected to US 10 just west of the floating bridge in Seattle. You could pick it up by turning onto Dearborn or off of Empire Way where you'd pass through the Mount Baker Ridge and cross Lake Washington. In those days there was only one floating bridge. Coming up from Tacoma my dad would often sneak cross-country through Renton and Issaquah where we connected to what he called "The Yellowstone Trail," although the name had fallen into disuse by that time. You can still drive the route between Renton and Issaquah by following Highway 900 east.

 

Each summer we would head for my aunt's and uncle's place in Montana. The ultimate destination varied from time to time because my uncle worked for the Milwaukee Railroad and lived anyplace between Avery, Idaho, and Butte, Montana. Avery is just south of Wallace so Highway 10 was our natural route. The Milwaukee right of way, albeit now abandoned, still follows old 10 and yes, I-90 most of the way. I witnessed the seemingly slow progress of I-90 in the late 1950s, 1960s, and early 1970s, as bit by bit, the old route was downgraded or abandoned completely. Even as a young teenager I realized something was changing. Yes, we certainly made better time, but at what cost? The old gas stations and diners we frequented eventually faded away, victims of the hypnotizing effects of freeway driving. The towns no longer seemed vital, at least not at their cores. Why would they when services moved out to the interchanges and the local drive-ins and diners lost their life blood to Denny's, McDonald's, and whatever other chain one can think of. Even the little stores became mini-marts with pre-made sandwiches in coolers, and burgers wrapped in tinfoil sitting on warming racks.

 

For those reasons and many others, I still drive the two-lanes when I can. Granted sometimes even I am in a rush, but if possible I follow the Moon's "Blue Highways" as often as I can, seeking out my youth even if only in memories.

 

I know, this is a very convoluted introduction, so here goes. I'm 60, still live in Washington State (Yakima). I'm retired from the State of Washington and have been married 40 years. I graduated from Western Washington State College in 1969, before every educational institution in America was upgraded to a university. I have two grown children, a sone living in Canyon Country, Ca, and a daughter residing in Bellingham, Washington. I like to travel, especially by car and train. I read, study history, and write now and then. That's one of the reasons I joined this forum.

 

Thanks for having me. I look forward to reading your posts and writing a few responses.

 

Ray

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Welcome aboard Ray! We hope you enjoy your time here at the AMERICAN ROAD garage, swapping road stories! :welcome:

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Ray,

 

Welcome!!!!

 

Your description of old 99 was great! We live in Olympia, about 2 miles from the old alignment, and I know it well. And I worked at TCC in Tacoma for a while in the 1980's.

 

And the Yellowstone Trail is very familiar. Living as you do in Yakima, you are probably aware that there is an unpaved section of the original Yellowstone Trail just north of Yakima. It runs between Selah and Ellensburg, mostly along Wenas Rd.

 

And Boy, am I happy to see another Northwesterner posting! We need to share the good stuff we have around here!

 

Yakima is a great base for exploring the old Yellowstone Trail and of course US 10.

 

Two of my favorite drives are on old US 10, one along the river between Cle Elum and Ellensburg and the other from George back along Vantage Road to the Columbia River along the old alignment. That is a true gem. Have you followed that segment along the cliffs and down to where it goes into the water? And of course there is the section from Ellensburg to old Vantage. We took that route in 1948 and stopped at the Ginko Petrified Forest.

 

BTW, I am also a Washington State retiree..... from the higher ed side of the house.

 

Well, let’s have some more great stuff from you. If you need any help just send me an e-mail at dave.paul@att.net or a personal message via the forum.

 

Again, welcome!

 

Keep the Show on the Road! Dave

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Welcome to the forum, Ray. It is good to see some more folks from the west. With the recent rash of Indiana people, I was starting to really fear for the other regions during the tug-of-war at the next picnic.

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I have been remiss at welcoming our recent new members. Maybe I am just waiting to hear about a location I have seen before, but I do keep adding to the list of places I want to visit. So all keep posting and telling me about places I need to see, and hopefully I will understand more in the future.

 

Welcome one and all, and enjoy the drive!!!

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Thank you to several Daves, Denny, Jennifer, and anyone else I might have missed mentioning. No slights intended.

 

This certainly is a very welcoming and free-wheeling group (pun intended). I look forward to learning a great deal about the two-lane pavements (and dirt roads) that spun the fabric of this nation.

 

Perhaps it's wanderlust, but I have always felt that the best part of any journey is the actual time spent either on the road or darn close to it. By that I mean the local businesses, scenic vistas, historical markers, landmarks, and local lore. Often after reaching my destination, I become restless in anticipation of either retracing my route, or taking an alternate course. With gasoline prices soaring into the stratosphere, I still try any angle I can to hand-deliver a package to my daughter in Bellingham, even though that 450 mile round trip will cost at least $60. I could mail it for $8.00, but what fun is that?

 

Dave, you mentioned the dirt portion of the Yellowstone Trail running between Yakima and Ellensburg. Coincidentally, I was toying with the idea of making that run earlier this morning, but after seeing the snow lying on the ground here in Yakima with the temperature hovering at 24F, I thought better of it. That'll have to be another day. I've taken the road over the Manastash (as the locals call it) twice. It is dirt all the way from Wenas Lake to just south of Ellensburg. Much of the route skirts or traverses the L T Murray Game Preserve. There really isn't much up there except rocky ground, peace and quiet, wome wildlife, and only the occasional opposing vehicle. The welcome dearth of traffic is a two edged sword. After negotiating several hills and sharp curves without seeing another soul, it can be quite startling to round a bend and find a 4X4 raising dust and heading right at you. You wake up in a hurry.

 

I, too, have often driven the Ellensburg to Cle Elum stretch of old US 10, now SR 10. It's wonderfully scenic and hasn't changed much in the nearly 40 years since I-90 eclipsed the route. The same rotting trestles carrying the old irrigation system that I first saw in 1954 still hug the road shoulder. Below, the Yakima River is flanked on the north by the BNSF's Stampede Pass line, while to the south runs the John Wayne Trail, the now abandoned Milwaukee line. Teanaway Junction, at the west end of SR 10, is little changed. The old rest area/meeting place is still there where the YT came down from Blewett Pass and headed west into Cle Elum, abouit three miles distant. Sadly, or maybe not so sadly depending upon one's sensitivities,

the portapotties have been removed.

 

The businesses along Cle Elum's main street come and go, reflecting the former coal mining town's attempts to replace its major industry with tourist activities and commercial establishments. The Cottage is still as busy as ever. It's been there since 1937 and is worth a stop. Near the west end of the business district sits Mama Vallone's Italian eatery. It's very good, but much more expensive than some of the other restaurants and diners. There are a couple of hamburger joints that are pretty decent, but the town has succumbed to a plastic Dairy Queen right across from the post office and a Burger King at the Safeway plaza on the west end of town. The modern transgressions are pretty easy to ignore, though. Diamondback's has taken over the old Cavellini's, but is also on the pricey end. The Sunset Cafe is still extant a bit farther east. Just before heading up the hill where the old highway hits I-90 is a new traffic light governing the road to South Cle Elum. Inside the restored Milwaukee depot is a restaurant serving breakfast and lunch. There is an interpretive trail through the site of the old rail yard. The Cascade Rail Foundation is attempting to restore the former subdivision point. It's worth a visit. To find it, follow the signs to the Old Bunk House Bed and Breakfast. This place is also worth a stop or stay.

 

I Have driven old US 10 east of Ellensburg less frequently. It crests several miles east of town and heads down a steep grade past Gingko Petrified Forest State Park and into the reincarnation of Vantage which was moved south to where the new bridge crosses the Columbia River. In 1961, the town and old bridge were

inundated by the lake formed behind Wanapum Dam. Many a car overheated on that 10-mile grade coming west.

 

There are paired viewpoints along I-90 east of the river. The eastbound stop offers views of the river, surrounding hills, Wanapum Dam, and some metal sculptures titled "Grandfather lets loose the horses." Westbound, one can wander (be careful of rattlers) on paved trails overlooking the river and its escarpments. There is one particular outlook along the trail where the old road is visible, far below, snaking up the cliffs. Once east of the Columbia few vestiges of the old route remain, as I-90 was built pretty much on top of it. Of course, there are a few exceptions; notably at Moses Lake, Ritzville, Sprague, and Cheney.

 

Thanks, Dave. You jogged some of my memories. I'll yield the floor now. So, tell me what you remember of old 99.

 

Ray

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Thanks, Dave. You jogged some of my memories. I'll yield the floor now. So, tell me what you remember of old 99.

 

Ray

 

Wow, Ray, that is quite the recollection and description...and may I add your writing is very interesting!

 

I’ll add to the Cle Elum recollections just two things, the Milwaukee Road Railroad station and powerhouse, and the old brick Ford Garage downtown. I was driving through there a few years ago when they were sandblasting the brick and there was the old Ford sign from the 1920’s, exposed for the last time!

 

I am going to start a new thread in the US Highways and Auto Trails section here tonight. You would do me a favor if you would take a look at a postcard image I bought a month or so ago. The bridge is (I believe) the one on the road to Thorp. Where is US 10 in relation to this photo?

 

Look for the photo in the US Highways and Auto Trails Forum here, probably tonight.

 

As for US 99…you are much more the pro than I. I have lived here only since the mid 1980’s. Do you recall a blue building on the left that served at one time as a French restaurant, about 5 miles south of Olympia? I have wondered about it.

 

If you go on up the I-90 freeway grade beyond the metal horses and pick up the old Vantage Road, there is a wonderful old alignment to follow that takes you back down (southwest) to the Columbia River, where it goes under water. The old road eastbound crossed the river on the old Vantage Bridge, then ran along the base of the canyon before climbing out on the road I’m describing. I have a photo of me on it taken in 1948!

 

Finally, I have 1916-17 auto club strip maps of most of the state. I have not put them on my map site (historicalroadmaps.com) because no one has asked. Would they be of interest?

 

Keep the Show on the Road! Dave

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To our recent new members, welcome!

 

I just realised I have never properly introduced myself, despite being a member for a couple of years. I am twenty-one, and I am a Senior majoring in History at Miss. State U., although I live in the southern part of the state. My interest in roads comes indirectly from my dad, who has been driving a truck since I was two. I would follow his travels on my maps at home.

 

Later I began to notice the lines beside the interstate--"look at 11; it follows I-59 all the way" (at the time, I did not know that it was I-59 that follows 11, not the other way around). After I started riding with my dad on the truck, I noticed not much besides trees can be seen from the interstates, at least in this part of the country. After I started driving, I realised that I much prefer driving the two-laners that go through the towns instead of bypassing them. Sure, the drive is a bit slower, but I get much more out of driving down the main streets than flying by at 70 m.p.h.

 

My interest in old maps started about a decade ago. One of my favourite books was _Cheaper by the Dozen_, and there is a mention in that book of the _Automobile Blue Book_. A bit over three and one-half years ago, I finally owned a version, the 1926 Vol. 2, covering the Mid Atlantic and Southern states. That has been followed by a 1957 48 state atlas and a few Miss. maps ranging from 1932 to 1976.

 

Now I follow two-lanes almost as much as possible, even for long trips, such as the trip I took from Texas this summer. I would have followed two-lanes to Dallas, but my trucker dad was driving, so it was Interstate and four-lane 49 all the way.

 

Tracy

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