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Celebrating our two-lane highways of yesteryear…And the joys of driving them today!

RoadDog

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Everything posted by RoadDog

  1. He's owned it for 22 years, but Ray Piercy, 69, says its time to close it down because of health issues and competition from chain restaurants. He wants to sell it for $1.75 million and it consists not only of the diner, but also an old motel, and 1.75 acres on US-40. That is a whole lot too much if you ask me. Hey, even the Blue Swallow in Tucumcari went for under $200,000. The diner is known for its tenderloin sandwich. The diner itself consists of two parts. The front is a 35 foot aluminum structure made in 1954. It fronts an attached regular building which holds the kitchen and more dining. In 2004, it received a plaque from the National Road Association. Anyone have pictures? Neat Place, But TOO Expensive. --RoadDog
  2. As folks out there traveling on the roads, it is sometimes necessary to stay in a motel. Most of my experiences have been good ones, but there have been a few not-so-nice. This account has to take the cake. Kathy Weiser, owner and editor of Legends of America stopped in Lebanon, Missouri had had an unbelievable experience. Read about it at her blog spot: http://legendsofamerica.blogspot.com Yeah, she SHOULD have stayed at the M-M. I bet she wishes she did now. Watch Where You Stay on the Road. --RoadDog
  3. RoadDog

    On The Way To Nashville

    I just hate it when that bowl of oatmeal "stares me down."
  4. Good link to the archives as well. I found the whole Winding Road site so interesting, I put it on my favorites. Remember, if you're in Thailand, you might want to consider pulling your car over if they play the national anthem. Stop it, sing it, but don't drive it. Keep on Down that Two Lane Highway. --RoadDog
  5. We all know about that great Root 66 Beer from Illinois, but now we have our own alcoholic beer. But as far as I know, only available in the UK. Came across an article in the UK's Barkeeper site saying that Protege's International Route 66 Premium Beer is now available in Tesco's across the country. A Tesco is like our Wal-Mart. I went to their website www.route66beer.com and saw Cadillac Ranch with one car replaced by a Route 66 Beer bottle. Their logo: "Route 66- a long Rejuvenating, Lean, Cool drink." Also the words, "The unforgettable Route 66 is the embodiment of the American Dream." The label features a car in a desert scene and the words Route 66. Has anybody seen any of this beer? Got Me Thirsty, You Know. --RoadDog
  6. RoadDog

    Where Dinosaurs Breed On Route 66

    I saw that place last fall when we did our Route 66 end-to-end cruise. Quite an interesting place, but we were getting too far behind so didn't stop. Something for the next cruise. Looks like a great old tourist trap.
  7. I sent a copy of that article to my cousin who is NOW planning on taking a trip with a group of friends along the road in the near future. Great article. I just might get Mr. Interstate off onto a two-laner. Here's Hoping. --RoadDog
  8. Thanks for those memories. I sure enjoyed that cruise and was amazed by all the people lining the roads. Read an article in the Springfield State Journal Register about the fact that this set a record with 1,169 cars in the parade. There were also a lot of comments on the article and some people were not happy that they had to wait. All I can say is to get out of your car and enjoy the spectacle. I'm happy to see that no dogs were injured in the making of the film. My wife yells at me when I drive and take video at the same time, even though I rarely look at the viewfinder. Springfield, Illinois. A Great Place to Visit. --RoadDog
  9. Went to good ol' Northern Illinois University in Dekalb from 1969 to 1971 and 1972-1973. I also got my Masters from there. Been back many, many, many, many times since then. Spent many a night doing what we called the "Lincoln Crawl" from one bar to another on the Lincoln. Sometimes quite literally. Too Old to Do the Lincoln Crawl Much Anymore. What Did Bochepus say about Corn Bread and Ice Tea? --RoadDog
  10. RoadDog

    New Lh Blog

    Brian, thanks for making this available. It is on my favorites list already, and if I figure out RSS, I'll put it there as well. Route 66 has one, and now so does the Lincoln.
  11. I was very happy to come across an article about a yard sale that was held along US-80 in East Texas in conjunction with the US-80 Fall Auto Cruise. It went from Mesquite, Texas to Monroe, Louisiana and billed itself as "the world's largest yard sale." It was sponsored by the East Texas Tourism Association. They said the road went 2,700 miles from the Atlantic Ocean by Georgia to the Pacific by California. They are "trying to draw attention to the historic route and its roadside architecture that includes classic old mom andpop motels and service stations reminiscent of days gone by." In several places Old US-80 parallels the present US 80 including the stretches between Big Sandy and Gladewater and Gladewater to White Oak and Longview. Many downtown streets are also the original US 80. They have an excellent website at www.us80.com which is well worth checking out. It is always good to see regions recognizing the significance of the old roads so hats off to East Texas and US-80. Keep on Down that US-80. --RoadDog
  12. I need to add a couple of interstates to the list. I just got back from a two week vacation in NC and was very impressed with the West Virginia Turnpike, well worth the the $3.75 admission for tolls. As a matter of fact, if I wasn't going to visit relatives in Nashville on the way back, I would have gone back on the Turnpike. However, I did see some great color on I-40 either side of the Tennessee-North Carolina border. Keep on Down That Two Lane Highway, But Sometimes an Interstate is OK Too. --RoadDog
  13. OLD LINCOLN HIGHWAY BRICKS FOUND IN DAYTON, OHIO Earliet this month, a lot of original Lincoln Highway bricks, laid down in 1914, were found during roadwork on Canton's Tuscarawas Street. I would have expected Canton to keep them to have left the bricks in place and use them, but, plans are to ship the bricks out to the Great Platte River Road Archway over I-80 in Kearney, Nebraska. Kearney was the halfway mark of the old LH, and the arch is a few miles from the alignment. They are ecstatic about getting the bricks for a planned project. There had been plans to get a brickmaking company to make new ones and perhaps a hope for a few "real" bricks. This goes far beyond their wildest dreams. Once in Kearney, they plan to cobble them together into a 16 foot wide and 30 foot long stretch of road. The museum documents the history of transportation in the US from the old wagon trails to the present with a major emphasis on the Lincoln Highway. If the bricks gets there, and there is still some question as to whether they're being loaned or donated, and Canton says they are not going to pay to ship the bricks, they will join a 130 foot-long metal bridge made by the Canton Bridge Company. At one time, Canton was called the brick-making capital of the world. The one time we went under the arch, we were on a tight schedule and didn't have the time to warrant a look at this museum for the price of admission, which I believe to be around $10 or $12 if I remember correctly. Keep on Down that Two Lane Highway. --RoadDog
  14. Illinois' NorthwestvTollway, Interstate 90, has a new name from the I-294 junction out past Rockford to the Wisconson state border. It will now be known as the Jane Addams Memorial Tollway, named after the famous social activist. It is the first road in Illinois named after a woman and some activists are quite angry at how long it took. Jane Addams, the founder of Chicago's Hull House, never owned a car and preferred to hike or ride a bike when she wanted to go somewhere. She studied at what is now Rockford College and was born and is buried near the tollways' alignment. Let's Update those Maps. --RoadDog
  15. True, and anymore, it is not pleasant slogging your way through Woodstock and Huntley. However, in between those towns, there is some great country driving plus those interesting oval barns. In Morris, I've heard there is a truckstop that serves up two pound cheeseburgers with all the fixins' and some people actually attempt to eat it all. I normally take Il-47 all the way to Champaign and then catch the interstate over to Indiana and then US-41 to Nashville. Trying to Avoid the Chicago Hassle. --RoadDog
  16. If you're trying to get around Chicago and want to avoid the hassle of congested freeways and suburbia, I recommend Il-47. It runs from the Wisconsin border at Herbron and eventually ends up just west of Champagne. We take it from Woodstock to Dwight, where we get off onto US 66. There is great scenery and interesting places to stop including the patriotic hotdog. However, suburbia is lapping at its shoulders so I don't know how much longer it will be a good alternative. Morris and Yorkville are worth stops as well. Keep on Down that Two Lane Highway. --RoadDog
  17. Have you ever had any paranormal experiences on the road? Tuesday, I was having breakfast at Springfield, Illinois' famous Cozy Dog. I was reading one of the magazines from their periodical library and at a table near the Liar's Table, when a metal condiment holder just fell off an unoccupied table. A guy from the Lair's Table got up and cleaned up the mess and put it back. They said that this has happened before and had a scientific explanation. About 15 minutes late, it happened again. I'm of the opinion that it might be from someone who died at the former Abraham Lincoln Motel that originally occupied the site. Cozy Dog used to be next door, but its property was bought by Walgreen's and a new store erected. Imagine Walgreens doing that? Or, perhaps it was Ed Waldemire warning me not to try to leave with the magazine still in my possession. Whatever the case, that was mighty strange. Does Anyone Remember that Great Old Song "Laura?" --RoadDog
  18. I came across an excellent blog by Tom Spaulding who goes by NorCal Explorer. In it, he talks about US-40 which was the major approach to Sacramento from the Bay area. It was once a part of US-50 as well. Motels, restaurants and a drive-in theater along this stretch used boldly designed buildings and neon to lure tourists off the road. A lot of this has been lost and what's left is greatly endangered by the town of West Sacramento's very strict sign ordinance. This area was west of the old Tower Bridge (1935) which looks like a mini version of London's Tower Bridge. When the new freeway bypassed this area, decline set in and West Sacramento is on a mission to change its image, often at the expense of its heritage. This blog entry is loaded with pictures and informative captions and worth a check. http://tspauld.blogspot.com September 24th "US Route 40: West Sacramento's Motel Row" You can also search NorCal Explorer Well Worth a Visit. --RoadDog
  19. I just came across the article. I think it is very appropriate that they did that. What a horrible way to die on Christmas Day. I folowed the story closely at the time.
  20. It was a great time getting together with all the AR folks in at the bridge and in Springfield. Almost missed the rendezvous site at Hardee's on the Illinois side. I forgot it was a Hardee's by the interstate, so the sign would be way up high. Caught it just in time, and there was Kent, sipping on his coffee. Liz is going to try to get the address of that school in Mitchell so we can do some follow up. As a 33-year teaching vet myself, I can just see what happened in the classrooms Friday morning. The teacher asked them if they'd rather tale the scheduled spelling test. or go out in the fantastic fall sunshine and watch all these old classic and sports cars go by. I just know how that vote went. I hope that the students got a little bit of 66's history before-hand. I know a lady came by on the Missouri side with an advertiser paper that had two whole pages on Route 66. Kent is a great lead car driver, and never got us lost, even once. Nice job, Bliss!!! Hey, and Denny didn't even hit one dog. Word must have gotten out from Kentucky, and they were staying off the road. This was like a reunion of last April's Kentucky roadtrip. Show me the bridge. --RoadDog
  21. We'll be in a black "See the USA in your Malibu" covered with Route 66 signs. Denny, I'd be up for the cruise and am sure I can get "permission" to do so.
  22. The next time you are driving US-20 in Illinois, don't be surprised if you see pictures of the 18th president along the way. That's because the 195 miles of US-20 has been officially designated the US Grant Memorial Highway. Actually, it was so designated back in the 50s by the General Assembly, but they're just now getting the signs up. US Grant was living in Galena, Illinois when the Civil War broke out, and a grateful citizenry of Galena gave him a house at the end of the war. It was from here that he campaigned for president. US-20 goes within a couple blocks of this house. The thought is that everyone knows of Illinois' connection with Lincoln and this will help increase awarenessf the role Illinois played in Grant's life. Keep on Down that US Grant Highway. Let's Get Those Maps Changed. --RoadDog
  23. It is good to see Wisconsin starting to get involved with the Yellowstone Highway. Way to go Badgers.
  24. RoadDog

    Michael Wallis On Colbert Show

    I'd say Michael got old Cobert with the "Gleam in his eye" comment. He had a great comeback on the "Road of my interest" when Colbert tried to call him on saying the Lincoln and Route 66 were "my" roads.
  25. Did anybody see Michael Wallis on the Colbert Show on Comedy Central last night? I'd say Michael fared very well, despite Colbert trying to trip him up.
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