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  • Foster Braun

    American Road Trip Talk: Heather Hausmann: Sinful Sidney Sesquicentennial

    By Foster Braun

    Click here to listen…
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    In the rough and tumble days of the late 1800’s, the little town of Sidney, Nebraska was an important military and commercial outpost on the railroad lines that were becoming the arteries of American expansion. It was indeed the Wild West, populated by such colorful characters as Buffalo Bill and Calamity Jane and earned the moniker, Toughest Town on the Tracks.
    In 2017 what was once called Sinful Sidney is celebrating its Sesquicentennial ( that’s 150 candles) between Aug. 18-20 with a double extravaganza. One is man-made and the other is Mother Nature made and utterly unique. Our guest Heather Haussmann, Cheyenne County Visitor and Convention Bureau, which is based in Sidney, has all the details for both events.


    ############


    Sinful Sidney’s Sesquicentennial
    This summer the “toughest town on the tracks” is rolling out the red carpet for lovers of the Wild West and good old fashioned family fun. Whether you are a classic car enthusiast, history buff or just making plans for a family vacation, you’ll want to save August 18-21 for a visit to Sidney, NE.

    If any place knows how to throw a great party, it’s Sidney. Over the last 150 years the town, known as the “Wickedest Town in the West”, has seen the likes of Buffalo Bill, Wild Bill Hickok, and Calamity Jane. Good food, non-stop entertainment, a classic car show and loads of activities for kids will be topped off by two extraordinary light shows. The first one will be a spectacular firework display on Sunday night at the Cheyenne County Fair Grounds. The second one will be a once in a lifetime experience put on Mother Nature.

    On Monday, August 21, Western Nebraska will be one of the best places in the country to watch a total eclipse of the sun—make Sidney your hub. This will be the first total solar eclipse visible in continental United States for the 38 years and you will have one of the best seats in the house. Nebraska is one of a few places in the country that will be under the complete blackout as the moon blanks out the sun and day turns to night for nearly 3 minutes. It will be an historic event for young and old alike.

    This summer Sinful Sidney 150 will be an awesome opportunity to enjoy a good old fashioned community celebration and get a good night’s rest before witnessing the rare historic event of a total solar eclipse. It’s an experience your family will treasure for the rest of their lives.

    Don’t forget to mark the dates, August 18-21, 2017 in Sydney, NE. It’s going to be an unforgettable event that you won’t want to miss. For more information visit cheyennecountytourism.com and follow the celebration on Facebook at “Sinful Sidney 150 Sesquicentennial Celebration.”
      ########




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  • etchr66

    Geneva And Geneva On The Lake Ohio

    By etchr66

    It's summer time and its hot. What better way to cool down then to spend some time at the lake. With that in mind, our Namesake town for this entry is Geneva, Ohio and the nearby summer resort town of Geneva on the Lake. Both are located in Ashtabula County, which has a wealth of museums and sites of historic interest. In addition there are some eighteen covered bridges in the county, including both the longest and shortest covered bridges in the United States. Add the ten or so wineries in the county and what's not to like?   At 613 feet the Smolen-Gulf Bridge, loacted on Ashtabula County Road 25 just south of the city of Ashtabula, is the longest covered bridge in the country and the fourth longest in the world. The map coordinates are (41.855458,-80.762204). At just 18 feet the shortest covered bridge is the West Liberty Street Bridge in the town of Geneva. The map coordinates for it are (41.799183,-80.948532). [1]   Please comment if you like these entries or have any feedback to offer.   From the book "For Namesake, a Travel Book" [2]:   Geneva, Ohio is a town of 6,215 located in Ashtabula County along US Route 20. It lies 25 miles from the Pennsylvania border and 45 miles northeast of Cleveland. Geneva on the Lake is a town of 1,288, which lies 5 miles north of Geneva on Ohio Route 534. The county seat of Ashtabula County is Jefferson, located 10 miles southeast of Geneva. The closet college is Lake Erie College in the city of Painesville.   Ashtabula County was established in 1807 and was the first county created in the Connecticut Western Reserve. The area around Geneva was originally part of Harpersfield Township. In 1816 a small group of settlers decided to withdraw from Harpersfield and create their own community. They named it Geneva for the scenic town of Geneva, New York. With the completion of the Eric Canal in 1825, its location close to the lakefront added to its attraction. In 1829 the first post office was established. By 1840 the population was over 1,200. The Lake Shore railway came from Cleveland through Geneva to Ashtabula in 1852. The community of Geneva was incorporated as an official Ohio Village in 1866. By 1896 the village had a population of three thousand persons. In the early 1900’s Geneva gained its first automobile industry company with the manufacture of the Geneva Steamer in 1901. The company that manufactured this car closed just 3 years later. A few other attempts were made to manufacture automobiles in Geneva; however they too only lasted a few years. The grape industry has played an important part in the economy of Geneva and still does so today. In 1958 having obtained a population over 5000, Geneva was incorporated as an official Ohio “City”. [3]   Geneva on the Lake was Ohio’s first summer resort. It began in 1869 with the opening of the first public picnic ground on a bluff above Lake Erie known as Sturgeon Point. By the early 1900’s it had evolved into a camping and fishing playground for America’s elite. Incorporated as an Ohio Village in 1927; today it is a premier lakeshore vacationland. [4]   Ashtabula County has sixteen museums and sites of historic interest; the following is a sampling of those you may want to visit. The city of Ashtabula has Great Lakes Marine & Coast Guard Memorial Museum, Hubbard House (a northern terminus of the Underground Railroad) and Olin’s Museum of Covered Bridges. Conneaut has the Conneaut Historical Railroad Museum. Shandy Hall, 2 miles south of Geneva, is the 1815 home of Robert Harper and said to be the oldest frame house in the Western Reserve to be preserved in its original form. Hartsgrove has the Presidential Museum. In Jefferson you will find a nice railroad depot and the Victorian Perambulation Museum. In Windsor there is the Servants of Mary Center for Peace featuring a fifty-foot statue of Our Lady of Guadalupe. There are eighteen covered bridges in Ashtabula County including the longest one in the United States, spanning a distance of 613 feet. [1] The warm breezes off of Lake Erie make this region a prime location for growing grapes and there are some ten wineries in the county. [5] Geneva hosts an annual Grape festival in September. Geneva on the Lake is a very popular summer resort with a strip of tourist oriented businesses and parks. To learn about all of the attractions in the area stop by the Geneva on the Lake Visitor Information center at 5536 Lake Road.   Enjoy the Lake Erie shoreline with boating, camping, hiking, fishing or just relaxing at Geneva State Park, just one mile from Geneva on the Lake. Additional recreation areas include Pymatuning State Park and Reservoir, Mosquito Lake State Park and Reservoir, Headlands Beach State Park, and Punderson State Park.   Notable residents of Geneva include Brian Anderson, major league baseball pitcher; Edward S. Ellis, dime novel author; and Ransom E. Olds, automobile industry pioneer.       Notes:   1. http://www.experience-ohio-amish-country.com/covered-bridges.html   2. http://www.amazon.co.../dp/B00CBM6JFK/   http://www.barnesand...n=2940016722009   3. http://www.genevaohio.com/history.html   4. http://www.visitgenevaonthelake.com/history.htm   5. http://www.accvb.org/wineries.html   Picture is Harpersfield Covered Bridge, at 228 feet in length this was the longest covered bridge in Ohio until the construction of the Smolen-Gulf Bridge in 2008. Picture Credit: (Wikimedia Commons – User: Homefryes CC-BY-SA)
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  • Alex Burr - hester_nec

    Introduction

    By Alex Burr - hester_nec

    Hello. Tho I am new to this media, blogging, I am not new to American Road. I've been around since the beginning. I do have a road trip web site, but decided to give this blog a try to post my rather infrequent road trips in the Memphis, TN, area.   Being nearly 73 years old I'm old enough to remember the good old days of 2-lane road travel. Indeed, I went with my folks in the late 40's and early 50's on several trips from southern Maine to the Dayton, Ohio, area to visit friends and relatives. I look back and think, good old days?? Hot summer days on the road in a 10 year old Chrysler with no AC?? Motels that were more cabin than motel and usually not air conditioned?? Greasy spoon diners - tho most were pretty good. But, it was still exiting for a 10 year old to see what was around the corner. Kids miss so much today on vacation trips on the interstate. And there's not much new around the corner - or down the road, either. Got a Mickey D's in your home town - you'll find many along the road - along with BurgerKing, Wendy's, shopping malls with the same stores. No, kids today miss a lot.   Back in 1953 I was crazy enough to go to the west coast, from Maine, with a buddy of mine, on 20 to the mid-west where we picked up 66 to California. Then 101, more or less north to Oregon and Washington, then home to Maine, mostly on 20, but some on 30, 6 and 2. We were celebrating the big transition from child-hood to adult-hood - getting our drivers licenses. At the time, in Maine, you could get a license at 15 - Maine was largely rural and farm land so 15 year olds were expected to drive the family farm equipment, trucks, etc. Can you imagine two 15 year olds driving across country today?? Probably wouldn't get out of the state, to start with.   So, I'll probably be posting more on my new blog as time goes by. Won't be every day, won't be ever week. We'll try to find something to add at least inside a six month window.   Happy, and safe, travels everybody.
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Our community blogs

  1. blog-0513486001499130955.jpg

    Click here to listen…
    Click here to download…

    In the rough and tumble days of the late 1800’s, the little town of Sidney, Nebraska was an important military and commercial outpost on the railroad lines that were becoming the arteries of American expansion. It was indeed the Wild West, populated by such colorful characters as Buffalo Bill and Calamity Jane and earned the moniker, Toughest Town on the Tracks.
    In 2017 what was once called Sinful Sidney is celebrating its Sesquicentennial ( that’s 150 candles) between Aug. 18-20 with a double extravaganza. One is man-made and the other is Mother Nature made and utterly unique. Our guest Heather Haussmann, Cheyenne County Visitor and Convention Bureau, which is based in Sidney, has all the details for both events.


    ############


    Sidney 150 Logo NE State



    Sinful Sidney’s Sesquicentennial


    This summer the “toughest town on the tracks” is rolling out the red carpet for lovers of the Wild West and good old fashioned family fun. Whether you are a classic car enthusiast, history buff or just making plans for a family vacation, you’ll want to save August 18-21 for a visit to Sidney, NE.

    If any place knows how to throw a great party, it’s Sidney. Over the last 150 years the town, known as the “Wickedest Town in the West”, has seen the likes of Buffalo Bill, Wild Bill Hickok, and Calamity Jane. Good food, non-stop entertainment, a classic car show and loads of activities for kids will be topped off by two extraordinary light shows. The first one will be a spectacular firework display on Sunday night at the Cheyenne County Fair Grounds. The second one will be a once in a lifetime experience put on Mother Nature.

    On Monday, August 21, Western Nebraska will be one of the best places in the country to watch a total eclipse of the sun—make Sidney your hub. This will be the first total solar eclipse visible in continental United States for the 38 years and you will have one of the best seats in the house. Nebraska is one of a few places in the country that will be under the complete blackout as the moon blanks out the sun and day turns to night for nearly 3 minutes. It will be an historic event for young and old alike.

    This summer Sinful Sidney 150 will be an awesome opportunity to enjoy a good old fashioned community celebration and get a good night’s rest before witnessing the rare historic event of a total solar eclipse. It’s an experience your family will treasure for the rest of their lives.

    Don’t forget to mark the dates, August 18-21, 2017 in Sydney, NE. It’s going to be an unforgettable event that you won’t want to miss. For more information visit cheyennecountytourism.com and follow the celebration on Facebook at “Sinful Sidney 150 Sesquicentennial Celebration.”

     

    ########





    gallery_13589_96_8908.jpg


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  3. etchr66
    Latest Entry
    blog-0878895001416514367.jpg

    Our Namesake[1] city this time is Athens, Georgia

     

    Athens, Georgia (33.956093, -83.388951)

     

    Athens, Georgia is a city of 115,452 located in Clarke County along the routes of US 29 and US 441. The city lies just 60 miles northeast of Atlanta near the foothills of the Blue Ridge Mountains. Home to the University of Georgia and Piedmont College, it also features a restored Victorian era downtown full of art galleries, shops, nightclubs and fine dining establishments.

     

    Athens officially became a town in 1806 and was built on the banks of the Oconee River adjacent to where the University of Georgia was established in the late 1700’s. The area was named Athens after the city in Greece, by John Milledge, a university trustee and later Governor of Georgia. The city was a significant supply center for the Confederacy in the Civil war and still hosts a confederate memorial located on Broad Street near the University Arch. [2] If Civil war history is a passion for you, war exhibits are on display at the T.R.R. Cobb house at 175 Hill Street and you may pick up a map and brochure to the Heartland of the Confederacy Civil War Trails at the Athens Welcome Center at 300 N. Thomas Street. Athens also boasts the worlds only double barrel cannon. Built in 1863 at a local foundry and featured in Ripley’s Believe it Or Not! The cannon can be found at the intersection of City Hall, College, and Hancock Streets.

     

    Additional historical sites of interest in Athens include the Morton Theater, built in 1910 as one of the first African-American Vaudeville theaters; the First African Episcopal Methodist Church, built in 1866; Athens First Presbyterian Church, built in Greek Revival style in 1855 and remodeled in 1902; and the home of Joseph Henry Lumpkin, the first Justice of Georgia’s Supreme Court. The home was built in 1845 and is on the driving tour offered by Classic City Tours. You can take a tour of historic Athens daily at 2:00 PM starting from 280 E. Dougherty Street.

     

    The University of Georgia also has a rich history. Established in 1785, it was our nations first state charted university. The university was part of the civil rights movement in the 1960’s, admitting its first two black students in 1961. This was a big deal for Athens whose public schools remained segregated until 1970 despite the famous Brown Vs. Board of Education Supreme Court ruling in 1954. Today the university is home to some 34,000 students and boasts a visitor center, arboretum, performing arts center, Stegeman Coliseum for basketball and Sanford Stadium, home to the University of Georgia Bulldogs football team. Holding 91,780 cheering fans it is the nations 5th largest on campus stadium. Athens also hosts Piedmont College, a private liberal institution established in 1897, and Athens Technical College, which offers associate degrees.

     

    Other attractions in Athens include the Classic Center Theater, The Terrapin Brewery and the 40 Watt Club where you may enjoy the Athens music scene. If Art is your thing you might enjoy visiting the Georgia Museum of Art, Lyndon House Art Center, Lamar School of Art and ATHICA (Athens Institute for Contemporary Art). And you won’t be able to miss “We Let the Dawgs Out” which features some three dozen larger than life Bulldogs spread throughout the city. If flowers interest you don’t miss the State Botanical Gardens and ask at the Welcome Center about the Georgia Antebellum Trail. Parks also abound in Athens including Oconee Forest Park, Sandy Creek Park, Sandy Creek Nature Center, and Memorial Park, which has a zoo “Bear Hollow Wildlife Trail”.

     

    Notable residents and natives of Athens, Georgia include: Actress Kim Basinger, Musician Leo Kottke, NFL Football player Dunta Robinson, and Hall of Fame quarterback Fran Tarkenton. Fran went to Athens High School and the University of Georgia where he was quarterback of the Bulldogs and led them to a conference championship in 1959.

     

    Yes there is much to see and do in Athens, Georgia. Discover it all at the “Explore Georgia” Web Site. [3] Athens is included in the Historic Heartland region.

     

    Notes:

     

    1. www.amzn.com/B00CBM6JFK

     

    2. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Athens,_Georgia

     

    3. http://www.exploregeorgia.org

     

    Picture Credit: Street Scene in Athen's Georgia (Wikipedia Richard Chambers Public Domain)

     

  4. blog-0986201001354213144.jpg

    Another stop on our way out to Route 66 last year. Bring your "Off"

  5. LST 325-Tour an authentic WWII warship. She is "Last of the Class" meaning-the only operational LST in existence. http://dld.bz/aj3CW

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    This is a first for me. I'm trying to get information on the history of the Palmantier's Motel. Anyone know anything about it? We're now open for business! We have nightly and weekly efficiency rooms. They're huge rooms. We fell in love with the place at the action and just had to have it. So now we're the proud new owners. We are a family owned and operated business. Mom and Pop Motel also my son helps run the place. We're very interested in the history. The house that came with it sits on the corner of Baywood and Rt 30 Lincoln Highway was built in 1875. It was the original Palmantier's Tourist Home. I'm still digging for info. Please help if you know anything. Also come see us and ride your bike if you own one. The rooms have garages!!

  6. stmomobedandbreakfastsummerturkeybreast.JPG

     

    Hello everyone and Happy Fourth of July :) Well today it is raining up here on the Hill, but I still have grille cooking on my mind. A couple of weeks back I had friends over for dinner and came up with a refreshing idea for grilling the turkey breast. During the holidays, one of our local grocery stores had cut up turkey breast fillets and wrapped them in bacon to sell in packs. They make cooking turkey simple and very easy without the mess. I had bought quite a bit of these breasts and put alot of them in the freezer after using some for the holidays. During the holidays, I just bake or pan cook them and have the traditional holiday condiments to go with the turkey, nothing out of the ordinary. So going through my freezer, I had found the turkey I did not use, and thought of how could I use it to make a nice Summer grilled dish. So here is what I came up with.

     

    This is an easy dish that can be prepared easily in a camper or RV. Thaw the turkey, remove the bacon (it is only on there to help add some flavor), and place the breasts in a large ziplock bag. Then take a can of crushed pineapple and ad to the bag, juice and all. Added a little cranberry juice and seal the bag, place in refrigerator and marinated for 4 hours.

     

    Get some some green onion, fresh grape tomatoes, white onion, zuchinni, green pepper, a fresh pinapple, and a box of wild rice at the store. Cut the vegetables lengthwise and placed them on a slightly oiled sheet pan to roast at 350 for 15 to 20 minutes. Slice off the bottom and top of pineapple. Remove the outside skin from the pineapple, best done with a good French or cutlery knife by holding pineapple upright and slicing just underneath the outside in a downward motion, then cut the fruit lengthwise into 2 inch pieces.

     

    Fire up the grille and began cooking the turkey, seasoned it with a lime pepper seasoning, (can find in spice section or Sams' Club sells the big containers) flipping after about 12 minutes. I reccommend keeping the grille covered. Vegetables in oven. Follow the directions on the rice to get that going on the burner. That type of rice usually takes about 25 minutes. Now as option, you can take another can of crushed pineapple in a sauce pan, add a little cranberry juice, heat it up almost to a boil while stirring, and then add a cold water cornstarch mixture. (2 tblsp. cornstarch to just enough water to dissolve it) Pour slowly into the sauce and stir until it thickens just a little.

     

    The pinapple pieces place on the grille for about 3 minutes on each side, just enough to heat and grille the outside. Some nice grille marks will also form. Pretty cool way of using turkey outside of the holidays. Goes great with a bottle of good chardonnay or even a margarita.

     

    Plate up and enjoy!!!

     

    Sincerely,

     

    John Courter, CTA

    Museum Hill Bed and Breakfast

    St. Joseph MO

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    Recent Entries

    Alex Burr - hester_nec
    Latest Entry

    Hello. Tho I am new to this media, blogging, I am not new to American Road. I've been around since the beginning. I do have a road trip web site, but decided to give this blog a try to post my rather infrequent road trips in the Memphis, TN, area.

     

    Being nearly 73 years old I'm old enough to remember the good old days of 2-lane road travel. Indeed, I went with my folks in the late 40's and early 50's on several trips from southern Maine to the Dayton, Ohio, area to visit friends and relatives. I look back and think, good old days?? Hot summer days on the road in a 10 year old Chrysler with no AC?? Motels that were more cabin than motel and usually not air conditioned?? Greasy spoon diners - tho most were pretty good. But, it was still exiting for a 10 year old to see what was around the corner. Kids miss so much today on vacation trips on the interstate. And there's not much new around the corner - or down the road, either. Got a Mickey D's in your home town - you'll find many along the road - along with BurgerKing, Wendy's, shopping malls with the same stores. No, kids today miss a lot.

     

    Back in 1953 I was crazy enough to go to the west coast, from Maine, with a buddy of mine, on 20 to the mid-west where we picked up 66 to California. Then 101, more or less north to Oregon and Washington, then home to Maine, mostly on 20, but some on 30, 6 and 2. We were celebrating the big transition from child-hood to adult-hood - getting our drivers licenses. At the time, in Maine, you could get a license at 15 - Maine was largely rural and farm land so 15 year olds were expected to drive the family farm equipment, trucks, etc. Can you imagine two 15 year olds driving across country today?? Probably wouldn't get out of the state, to start with.

     

    So, I'll probably be posting more on my new blog as time goes by. Won't be every day, won't be ever week. We'll try to find something to add at least inside a six month window.

     

    Happy, and safe, travels everybody.

  7. Hello everyone!! As the weather gets nicer, more the public will be out and about on the road, enjoying the sunshine, fresh air, road trips, and all the unique places the US has throughout its road systems. This country's interstate system is one that can anyone with a vehicle or motorcycle just about anywhere, and if the interstate does not go directly to that place, there are many, many roads and old highways that can get us to where we need to go. In the Midwest there are so many different things to see and it is much more than the perception of farms and cornfields. That is what this blog is about, what is out there in the Midwest regions, the Heartland of this country. I will start by writing about a very unique museum with historical significance that should never be forgotten. The World War I Museum in Kansas City, MO is well worth a visit.

     

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PpZfmlFiolQ

     

     

    The Liberty Memorial - World War I Museum is a tour through world history. This museum tells the story of WWI, how it began, the people involved, the struggles, etc. During a visit to take time and read all the little placards throughout the outer rim of the museum as well as those on the walls inside about specific individuals. They all tell a unique story and this puts a very emotional human element to this time period. The placards capture the stories of real people from all walks of life thrown into a harsh and unforgiving environment. I created a short album in the gallery, highlighting some of the wall murals that the museum recieved over time. Below is also the link to the museum:

     

     

    The National World War I Museum at Liberty Memorial in Kansas City

    a605202ccad4dac

     

    The museum is one of many things to see and do during a road trip into the Midwest. I will be creating a bunch of topics as time moves on about the region that will make for a real interesting and knowledgable get away road trip. Safe traveling everyone!! :)

     

     

    Sincerely,

     

    John Courter-(CTA-Certified Tourism Ambassador)

    (Owner, Museum Hill Bed and Breakfast, St, Joseph, MO)

  8. On the way home from the Wisconsin Governor's Conference on Tourism I decided to take the Yellowstone Trail home since it was a beautiful spring day. I placed a bunch of photos in the gallery from along the way- however the photos are reversed so they start near Waupaca and end in Germantown.

     

    WI Yellowstone Gallery

     

    Here is a handy guide for the Yellowstone Trail- Online WI Yellowstone Guide

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    This is a effn’ good hot dog.”

     

    My brother Dan is a geologist and he never swears.

     

    We’re in an old building with salmon-colored walls. Dan plows through his third hot dog, smothered in relish, pickles and ketchup.

     

    “Are they dotted? Hey! Are they dotted? Five, one, three!”

     

    Yester-slingers shout in this thick Yester-brogue, barely audible over Casey Kasem’s American Top 40: The 70s. Coke and Quaker Oats spokeskids wink and pout from their rusty metallic signs. A girl, no more than eight, teeters back to her booth carrying a bottle of hot sauce and three bags of Cheese Curls.

     

    Yesterdog is a place yanked out of time, from the days of the shoop-shoop soda jerks and pie holes, but it is living and breathing in 2009 East Town, Grand Rapids. A plaster sign next door points to an Ethiopian Restaurant, which is down the street from a hookah bar and a jazz club. And it’s a block over from a ribs joint, whose barbequey goodness you can smell all the way down Wealthy Street.

     

    The atmosphere, akin to Old Country Buffet at Thanksgiving. But manager Rene "Nino" Torres is light on his feet and his power suit is a calf-long tear in his jeans and a Dickies button-up. Definitely no geeky Mickey D’s headset and boob-high pants slapped with the Yesterdog brand for this guy, no way. An old gramophone, flipped cone-up, serves as the tip jar—the trick, it’s small and it’s behind the counter. Quarters fling, the old crank register cranks with a good strong arm and hungry customers reach with hungry fingers. It is a process of synchronized chaos, with the dip, dive and dodge quality of a fight with Mohammed Ali.

     

    This restaurant exists without pretense in the beating heart of West Michigan—and it opens its screen door to everybody.

     

    But is it just the franks swathed in sweaty chili and cheese? That’s just another Coney Island—Michigan’s east side is littered with Souvlakis and Leos claiming to serve up New York’s best. Why is it a watering hole for the digestibly insane? For that matter, really, why is it the place for anyone looking for a good hot dog?

     

    Because food is culture. And culture is food. Everyone, everywhere is guzzling, shoveling, gnawing and slurping; right now, people are eating everything from blood sausages to seaweed salads. And the beauty of it, anybody with a stove and knife can mash, hash and serve food.

     

    Especially artery-clogging “street food”, as dubbed by chef, TV-host and bad-ass foodie, Anthony Bourdain; this past season on his Travel Channel show, No Reservations, Bourdain filmed an episode entitled “Down on the Street”. In an hour-long montage of not-five stars, but carts, vendors, hole-in-the-walls and Iggy Pop, Bourdain explains that it’s these places, places like Yesterdog, that offer the best experiences and tastes.

     

    Bourdain and chef buddy, David Chang, recently sat in on a Food and Wine panel in New York City. Bourdain reportedly asked Chang, "Is bacon less cool because Paula Deen likes it, or is it always cool, like Orson Welles?" Chang passed on explicating. But he did say that he “freakin’ hates cupcakes.” I’d say, from all of Bourdain’s serious pigging-outs on pork, he’s with Orson on this one.

     

    These guys just use food as the serving platter. The main dish, the people they eat with. The things they learn at the dinner table or street stall. The jokes they tell and the stories they hear. That, dear friends, is culture.

     

    And here at Yesterdog, it’s handed to us on a chilied-out bun.

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    At the urging of Becky Repp I will attempt to comprehend and take part in this Blog feature.

     

    For this last year our work with the Yellowstone Trail has been more or less limited to the Trail in Wisconsin. In deed, we have a product to show for the effort which I will comment on as soon as I have a better idea of what happens with this text after I "submit" it!

     

    Perhaps "Add Entry" is the way to go?

  9. Sheila and I enjoyed a National Parks fall tour a couple of weeks ago, but I have not posted much of the trip. Other activities have intervened, including the rediscovery of Spencer on the National Parks Highway (see posts on the forum).

     

    Our National Parks tour took us through Rainier, Glacier, and the North Cascades, and of course we stayed on the two lane roads. Interestingly, the highlight of the trip wasn’t any of the parks. Don’t get me wrong….all three are breathtakingly beautiful, and it has been years since I have been to Glacier. The photo I posted of Lake McDonald shows its beauty, and Rainier and the North Cascades were no less magnificent.

     

    But the highlights of the trip were the small, unassuming, basically unknown old lodges on lakes, miles from civilization. You won’t find these places in your AAA Tour Book, or in any “travel and spa” magazine. In fact, I had the feeling that maybe the owners and the clientele liked it that way!

     

    These are not the magnificent and storied lodges where a night will set you back a half week’s wages. They are simple, often rustic as the word was meant to be used, and personal.

     

    We stopped at three such lodges. These places harken back to the mom and pop days of road travel, and of course are still owned and operated by mom and pop. Mom serves up the food and cleans the cabins, and pop maintains the cabins and lodge, and tends bar in the evening.

     

    These lodges were everywhere in the west when I was a younger guy. Some of my fondest memories are of St Bernard Lodge (Chester / Mill Creek, CA) or Childs Meadows Lodge (Mt Lassen area), or Idywild Lodge (San Jacinto Mountains, So. Cal) and a half dozen others. Most are gone, but the tradition lives on in a few places.

     

    I know that it is comfortable to pull into a nice franchise motel for the night with the confidence the room will be clean, and often rather “familiar.” I don’t know how many motel doors we have opened and “recognized” the room. But I promise we didn’t “recognize” our room (cabin) at the typical example of the three lodges we visited.

     

    The beds were in the loft with a lake view, and downstairs the easy chairs had a view of the lake through the big picture window. There was a small deck, a barbeque, and a picnic table outside. Inside we had a stove and refrigerator and a TV, but no phone. The bathroom had a heater (!!!). The room was clean, but nothing was new. And there was no exercise room, no pool, and no steel armored door locks with triple deadbolts.

     

    The lodge had a small store, heavy on fishing gear, beer, and beef jerky, and a combination dining room, bar, and pool table area, with one corner devoted to fishing photos, and another to a fireplace. The owner tended bar and cooked and served a great steak dinner.

     

    In early October we had the dining room to ourselves. The steak filled half the plate and I had to leave half of my second glass of wine because the glasses were so big I feared I would stagger on the walk back to the cabin. The meal was straight forward, fresh and as good as home….or better.

     

    Our biggest hardship was that there was Wifi only in the lodge which didn’t reach the cabins, and the TV in the room was only useful to play DVD’s. Since the two steak dinners and wine came in under $30 and the cabin set us back $65, we suffered in silence!!!

     

    If I ever get around to posting stories of this trip, I’ll include some of the mom and pop lodges of the Northwest.

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